Why Should we Read and Support Modern Translations of the Bible?

Posted by Timothy Carter in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

We Should Read and Support Modern Translations of the Bible

●Koine Greek is NOT a holy biblical language. (Example: the Greek New Testament, and the Septuagint, written around the 1st centuries)

●Elizabethan English language is NOT a holy biblical language. (Example: King James Bible, newly translated in 1605)

●Both languages, the Koine Greek, and the Elizabethan English, was the common language of the time.

●Philo, is a good example of a non-Christian writer in koine Greek.

●Shakespeare, is a good example of the Elizabethan non-Christian writer.

●The point here is that the Word of God was written in the common language of the time.

●The Word of God was intended to be read, studied, utilized, and live by the everyday person.

●The Bible was never intended to be ambiguous, confusing, or in any way difficult to understand.

●“Iliad and the Odyssey,” by Homer the two oldest works of Greek literature was written down around 750 B.C.

●Around 1066 the English language began to change. English transformed from Old English into what is known today as Middle English or Elizabethan English.

Understanding these facts tells us that having modern translations of the Bible is a very good thing. Not only is having modern translations of the Bible a good thing; it is biblical, to translate God’s word into the common language of the people.

22 Comments

  • Reply March 22, 2016

    David Lewayne Porter

    As long as the modern translation does not alter the original thought and meaning.

  • Reply March 22, 2016

    Mike Stidham

    I like the KJV, but I do recognize its linguistic weaknesses. I would like to learn the original languages for study’s sake, though.

  • Reply March 22, 2016

    Timothy Carter

    Mike Stidham, a good place to start studying the original languages:
    https://billmounce.com/

  • Reply March 22, 2016

    Timothy Carter

  • Reply March 22, 2016

    Mike Stidham

    I think they use the Mounce text at the seminary I attend.

  • Reply March 23, 2016

    Vlad Stepanov

    Koine Greek is not a translation. The New Testament was written in Koine.

  • Reply March 23, 2016

    Frank Ehbrecht

    Which modern translation translates the Hebrew and Koine Greek the most accurate to the original? That’s what we should go with. We also need to read based on which manuscripts we believe are most accurate too. Based on these things I find the KJV best. However, I cannot understand Elizabethan English. Therefore, I read NKJV most.

  • Reply March 23, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    We’d be blessed if we can get this new generation read the Bible at all. Any Bible translation would do as long as they would read it.

  • Reply March 24, 2016

    Gottfried Sommer

    Gottfried Sommer liked this on Facebook.

  • Reply April 2, 2016

    Jerome T Morris

    Jerome T Morris liked this on Facebook.

  • Reply April 2, 2016

    Glynn Brown

    Glynn Brown liked this on Facebook.

  • Reply June 25, 2016

    Nathan Ridgeway

    They are not translations…they are transliterations. It seems, however, that with each new transliteration there comes another dilution of strength of truth. I still believe that Mary was a virgin when she bore Jesus. I do not believe she is a perpetual virgin, equal with God as do the Catholics. They’re confused. The NIV leaves out entire passages that are included in the KJV. So do others. In my Greek studies with Dr. French Arrington, I learned that KJV translators were very close to exact with the Greek. Don’t discount the accuracies of the Greek language. It has nuances that English doesn’t have that allow it to speak very clearly what God wants us to know. I read other versions, but always compare it to KJV and my Greek New Testament. “You shall know the truth and the truth shall set you free.”

    • Reply June 26, 2016

      Carl Murphy

      Well said. Anything produced today comes with a political and cultural agenda

  • Reply June 26, 2016

    Mary Ellen Nissley

    Each translation (interpretation) actually reflects the culture and faith of the people who did the work. That’s one big reason I prefer older translations. Today there’s just too little reverence for God’s inspired word, and too much rank apostasy among seminarians.

  • Reply June 26, 2016

    Louise Cummings

    I like King James Version. I guess if you like the others it’s ok. I get more understanding from King. James version. I feel like it’s more like the words of Jesus. I read new King James Version Sometimes.

    • Reply June 28, 2016

      John Ruffle

      KJV is very poetic and thus is easier to memorize. If you’ve read the KJV for a few decades, you tend to think in KJV.

  • Reply June 26, 2016

    Ricky Grimsley

    My mind only works in kjv. I do like the esv though.

  • Reply June 26, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    Most people who claim to read KJV read a very late and very revised American version of the original 1611. Most people dont event understand the original 1611 words http://www.pentecostaltheology.com/this-is-why-i-adhere-to-the-kjv/

  • Reply June 28, 2016

    John Ruffle

    To make secular publishing houses rich?

  • Reply June 28, 2016

    Mary Ellen Nissley

    Having been raised on KJV only, I memorized large passages in this translation… But I am finding more and more mistakes and outright biases in the KJV. It is NOT uncompromised. In fact, the KJV was the Anglican response to the Geneva Bible… and that’s why there is an overt mistranslation of many terms, such as “church” instead of “assembly”.

  • Reply June 28, 2016

    Jim Price

    We listen to many different preachers all with a slightly different take thus we grow if we have discerning power and grow confused if not. Each bible translation can add to our overall understanding if we don’t get bogged down in details.

  • Reply June 28, 2016

    Charles Page

    read modern language Bible to keep up with the liberal trends. Liberals need Bibles also!

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