Tares, Weeds and the Farmer’s Guide for Harvesting in the Spirit

Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

The parable says that during the final judgment, the angels will separate the “sons of the evil one” (the tares or weeds) from the “sons of the kingdom” (the wheat). It follows the Parable of the Sower, and precedes the Parable of the Mustard Seed.

Jesus told them another parable: “The kingdom of heaven is like a man who sowed good seed in his field.But while everyone was sleeping, his enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat, and went away. … He told them another parable:

Subversive Kingdom: The Parable of the Wheat and the Weeds … surprise us that many of His parables use metaphors related to farming. … the parable of the wheat and the tares has been frequently quoted, misquoted

Jesus’ teaching in parables is in fulfillment of scriptural prophecy. The parable of the weeds among the wheat sees the kingdom of heaven to be like a farmer who sows good seed and then is surprised to find it also contains weeds. The farmer could choose to wall off the unproductive areas of his land and leave them untilled. Instead … Between these two parables is the parable of the wheat and the tares. … The translation “weeds” is not strong enough.

“Look! I am with you all the days until the conclusion of the system of things.”—MATT. 28:20.

 

1. (a) Summarize the illu

30 Comments

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    Joe Absher Alan Smith Had to redo my corn today – grass took over – talking about the seeds and weeds parable; plowed it too hard and deep

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Joe Absher

    I’m all ears. Breaking up fallow ground has to be first right? Meaning conviction of sin?

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Joe Absher

    Break up your fallow ground I think is the most well known sermon of Finney. In preparation for a greater wider revival the church needs to repent of sin. Commission and omission.

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Joe Absher

    What do you mean harvesting in the Spirit?

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    do you know how when the seed come up you have to cover the grass- cant take it out or kill the seed too? Joe Absher

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Joe Absher

    I’ve done some hoeing. Some were pretty long rows.

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Joe Absher

    The part I thought was strange was taking the heads off the worm with your thumb.

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    it was a dry deserted land in a hot southern summer
    I wated for rain then plowed
    after rain soil was soft and I pished hard
    plowed too deep and the seeds got too deep
    when it rain hard and beat the soil down
    Strong southern sun hardened it fast even more
    and the seeds could not break through

    • Reply June 21, 2018

      Joe Absher

      What’d you do? How big was the field. You didn’t get down on your knees did you

    • Reply June 21, 2018

      Varnel Watson

      obviously writing a country song 🙂

    • Reply June 21, 2018

      Joe Absher

      The train is going by right now. Sounds like a long one.

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Joe Absher

    You’re killing me what’s next?

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    the parable does not account for the later and early rain Peter Vandever (I took the picture myself you know)

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Joe Absher

    I see some mountains way back. But to the story the later rain restores the harvest?

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    now I am using the LATER rain to restore my harvest

    1. soften the ground of the hardenned hearts

    2. revive the broken hearted

    3. Isaiah 42:3 A bruised reed He will not break and a smoldering wick

    …Oh, GLORY there is a sermon somewhere inthere – AMEN

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Joe Absher

    Oh so that’s it now you’re waiting?

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    When broken like a seed I feel a breakthrough

  • Reply June 21, 2018

    Joe Absher

    John 12:24 KJV — Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit.

  • Reply June 22, 2018

    Rebecca L Ringler

    We reap what we sow and have a lot to learn on this matter. No requirements to be a pastor either. Instead of 30, 60, 90, it goes to 100 fold. I hope to learn more about this.

  • Reply June 22, 2018

    Joe Absher

    When get back to it. I’d like to hear more.
    Psalm 126:6 KJV — He that goeth forth and weepeth, bearing precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him.

  • Reply June 25, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    Storms came over the weekend.
    All tall was leveled.
    All short survived
    #THERE

  • Reply June 26, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    Alan Smith Joe Absher
    me will be minding my corn
    ppl be hatin through the storm
    me still be minding my corn
    THE THRESHER COMETH

  • Reply June 28, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    Joseph Kidwell A lesson learned. I covered the weeds with newspapers. Mainly ones full with FoxNews news. They died within few days smothered under under them with no light from the Son. Weeds die when relay on darkness alone!

  • Reply June 28, 2018

    Joe Absher

    A lot of things grow in the dark. They ain’t all holy neither

  • Reply June 28, 2018

    Joe Absher

    Not to be out of order the plowing the sowing the watering. The harvest. Then comes the thresher
    Isaiah 28:28 — Bread corn is bruised; because he will not ever be threshing it, nor break it with the wheel of his cart, nor bruise it with his horsemen.

  • Reply June 28, 2018

    Joe Absher

    When I was growing up, school didn’t start until the crop was in the barn. To much rain if there is such a thing.

  • Reply June 28, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    Yap A month of cropping before school opened

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.