Sovereignty and Freedom: A panel discussion about “How Much Does God Control?”

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god-is-in-control_t_nvSovereignty and Freedom

A panel discussion about “How Much Does God Control?”

34 Comments

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    CrossTheology Sovereignty and Freedom: “How Much Does God Control?” GO! Brody Pope

    • Reply May 11, 2016

      Nelson Banuchi

      Troy Day, Thanks for posting that debate for me. I’ve seen that debate and Dr. Brown expertly uses the OT to support his position (as his forte is the OT), which is an obvious weakness for White. One of the better, if not the best, debates with White specifically on this issue.

    • Reply May 11, 2016

      Varnel Watson

      Nelson I watched Brown debate with someone (bald-head) and honestly I did not enjoy it neither could I figure out the relevance of some of the arguments they were bringing; though I enjoy Brown

    • Reply May 11, 2016

      Nelson Banuchi

      Troy Day Surprised you were unable to follow. White is bald.

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    It’s a free country. Still. Stan Wayne David Lewayne Porter

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    CrossTheology

    I would say most Pentecostals affirm Simple Foreknowledge in classical Arminianism. I believe in Open Theism (the present knowledge variant), which is accepted by the Assemblies of God.

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Stan Wayne

    I do not understand open theism if it means God did know something at some time (incarnation excepted)

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    Stan Wayne I am with you on this brother. Open theism makes no sense to lots of people but it does to bro. Ricky Grimsley 🙂

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Robert Borders

    Should be interesting. Randy Clark touches on this a bit in his new book entitled The Healing Breakthrough.

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    CrossTheology

    Stan Wayne I think my apology for Open Theism gives a good start in understanding Open Theism: https://crosstheology.wordpress.com/an-apology-for-open-theism/

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Henry Volk

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    Robert Borders Should be interesting!

    • Reply May 11, 2016

      Robert Borders

      I am presently reviewing process theology and Open Theism. I tend to be rather eclectic and open to theological mixes as I do not know everything about anything.

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Nelson Banuchi

    Re: Open Theism, I will go as far as to say, assuming God does not foreknow human free will choices, that God foreknows every possible choice one can make and has provided every possible response for every possible choice that one may actually make. Therefore, God is not caught by surprised, no guess work is needed for God to determine what to do next or, actually, what you will do.

    Simply stated, although one may claim God does not know the exact choice to be actualized, nevertheless, God can still bring future events to pass as he will knowing the full array of possible human choices and where each and every potential choice would lead if actualized.

    I’m not sure how this is different from Open Theism, but this is how I would describe an “open” view.

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    This is one of the reasons why I am not a Calvinist Ricky Grimsley if God does not know the future how does he hold the future? http://www.pentecostaltheology.com/why-am-i-not-a-calvinist/

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Robert Borders

    Robert Borders liked this on Facebook.

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    Troy Day liked this on Facebook.

  • Reply May 11, 2016

    Ricky Grimsley

    God controls everything in the sense that he sets parameters and gives things life and the power to do what they do.

  • Reply May 12, 2016

    David Lewayne Porter

    And He knows what we will do before we do it. He knew it all from the beginning. ?

  • Reply May 12, 2016

    CrossTheology

    David Lewayne Porter you should consider the context of the passage you alluded to: https://crosstheology.wordpress.com/declaring-the-end-from-the-beginning/

    • Reply May 12, 2016

      David Lewayne Porter

      Tom I have considered the context of the passage.
      I choose to not take any interpretation of any scripture by any person that lessens the Character of God as defined in the very same Scriptures.

      According to this, the author dances around the issues that would give him major issues,,, example Old Testament prophecy being fulfilled to the letter in the New Testament. (Example the betrayer and his bishopric being left empty, the field purchased with the monies – named before hand by quantity).
      Not to mention all the situations yet to occur in Revelation that God has already told us concerning).

      God has both intuitive knowledge and experiential knowledge.

      I love the fact some people are willing to take man’s interpretations and ideas over that of Jehovah God.

      Think of God the way you choice to brother. My God is omnipotent enough to know the end from the beginning down to the smallest detail and allow us to have total free-will at the same time.

      He does know the end from the beginning and He is the only one that knows and controls somethings. Matthew 24:36
      But of that day and hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels of heaven, but my Father only.

      I just pray the church stops thinking of God in their terms and learn about the true fulness of God.

    • Reply May 12, 2016

      CrossTheology

      neither the Son knows that hour… think about it…

    • Reply May 12, 2016

      David Lewayne Porter

      I did think about it.
      Trust me, I think about what I believe before I speak.
      The thoughts have already been dealt with.
      Are you questioning the Father’s abilities? You do realize there is a God-Head correct?

      Think about it.
      Take your time.

  • Reply May 12, 2016

    CrossTheology

    Nelson Banuchi you can hold to an Open View with Middle Knowledge. I personally disagree and only hold to present knowledge (term by David Basinger). More information available here: https://crosstheology.wordpress.com/a-perfect-world/

    • Reply May 12, 2016

      Nelson Banuchi

      CrossTheology, I don’t know exactly what I hold to. My preference, unless I am better convinced otherwise, is that God’s possess a foreknowledge that is simple but exhaustive, certain but not decreeing.

    • Reply May 12, 2016

      CrossTheology

      that’s what most Pentecostals believe. People call it the Arminian view but it’s often differently explained than Arminius himself would have explained it. 🙂

    • Reply May 12, 2016

      Nelson Banuchi

      CrossTheology How does Arminius explain it? Please provide a quote by him, if possible.

  • Reply May 12, 2016

    Louise Cummings

    I believe God knows everything. And can control everything. But He gives us choices to stay with Him or go our own way. Of Course in the end we will reel what we sow. He Will have the final say.

  • Reply May 12, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    On another note, this panel discussion about “How Much Does God Control?” may be just out of control

    • Reply May 12, 2016

      David Lewayne Porter

      Our control? (or His, not His, ?)

  • Reply May 12, 2016

    Ricky Grimsley

    I cant believe anyone believes that God actually controls everything unless by that you mean that he sets parameters.

  • Reply May 12, 2016

    Jerome T Morris

    Jerome T Morris liked this on Facebook.

  • Reply November 19, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    A good like by Jerome T Morris

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