Massive Youth Revival in the Schools of Delbarton, West Virginia

Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

Revival Rocks West Virginia School, Surrounding Towns

Pastor Mitch Bias, with the regional Church of God in Delbarton, said prayer, plus desperation, have paved the way for this spiritual breakthrough, especially among the young people. “It’s a climatic time,” he said. “I think the many years of creating a spiritual vacuum inside of kids by not teaching them the true reality that there’s a destiny in God — time plus chance, plus matter has produced a vacuum on the inside. “I think when they hear a message of hope it really speaks to them because they’re kind of hanging in a spiritual limbo,” he added. “And they press into it quickly to take it ’cause they know that’s the truth.”

45 Comments

  • Reply April 23, 2016

    James Hollomon

    No religion belongs in public schools. You’d be furious if the school officials decided to invite an Imam in to convert your kids to Islam. Rightly so. That’s why the Constitution provides for separation of church and state. Preach religion in revival tents or church, not public schools.

    • Reply April 23, 2016

      Tim Anderson

      James, In all respect, there’s no such language in the U.S. Constitution. Our constitution does prohibit Govt. from establishing religious rules, but does not prohibit the exercise of from private citizens in their daily activities.

      Find the reference, you won’t see it there. It’s an argument made of straw. Now I do agree I do not want state sponsored religion, but that’s a horse of a different color.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      James Hollomon

      Setting up a public school teaching one religion in exclusion of all others IS establishment of a state religion. You’d grasp that in a heartbeat if the schools state started teaching Islam or Hinduism as the true religion. You’re only immune to understanding it when it’s you forcing Muslim and Hindu and atheist kids to learn YOUR religion.

      You can teach religion as a subject, but that would look at all the great religions of the world and how they differ.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      Steve Webb

      They do teach Islam, in case you haven’t noticed. They do it regularly at the exclusion of every other religion.

    • Reply April 26, 2016

      Dian

      The prayer meetings have only been during lunch or before the first bell and it’s the kids that are doing it. The prayer club also has meetings at lunch. All the other meetings have been after school and in other venues …FYI…

    • Reply May 4, 2016

      Anonymous

      Separation of church and state is not in the constitution. It came from a letter Thomas Jefferson wrote.

  • Reply April 23, 2016

    Jon Ray

  • Reply April 24, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    James Are you offering a home school approach. What is the alternative?

  • Reply April 24, 2016

    James Hollomon

    You can legally teach religion at home, at Church, via home schooling, or even set up a church school or private school where people can enroll their children and where your particular brand of religion is part of the curriculum. What the US Constitution prohibits is setting up one particular religion and making it required study for all children, regardless of their parents religious beliefs.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      Steve Webb

      Incorrect. The US Constitution does no such thing. It guarantees religious freedom. The fallacy of separation of church and state comes from private letters to the Danbury Baptists, not the Constitution.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      James Hollomon

      Nice try, Steve, but flunk on Constitution 101. The letter you refer to was from Thomas Jefferson to the Danbury Baptists, who wanted to make sure their Baptist beliefs were not discriminated against by the State of Connecticut enshrining some other faith as the state religion. Jefferson was President at the time, but he had a great deal of influence in the drafting of the Bill of Rights. He knew whereof he spoke. Here’s the letter: http://loc.gov/loc/lcib/9806/danpre.html

      The actual clause in the Constitution reads “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…” Instituting a state religion to be taught in schools to the exclusion of all others is, as case law has determined, prohibited by that clause. If you’re a Pentecostal, you should welcome that. Roman Catholicism is the largest single Christian sect, so if states were at liberty to force all students to study a specific religion it would probably be Catholicism.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      Steve Webb

      James Hollomon the constitution in no way prohibits religion from being taught anywhere, including schools. There is absolutely nothing about keeping the two separate (church and state). The misinterpretation of the clause, which, fail for you, is not a clause, but the 1st amendment to the Constitution, makes our nation worse than it should be.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      James Hollomon

      It’s called the establishment clause, Steve. Look it up. Google is your friend. Per that portion of the 1st Amendment, holding a massive revival on school campuses is a violation of the Constitution whether it’s a Fundamentalist Christian revival or an attempt to convert all the kids to Wicca.

      Again, the Constitution absolutely does allow teaching comparative religion as a subject. But that’s not what this whole post is about. It’s about having a revival on campus.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      Steve Webb

      James Hollomon it very much sounds like you are part of the problem. I for one am ecstatic that our schools here in WV are experiencing revival. Revivals are in no way unconstitutional…no way, except for in the eyes of a closed minded liberal bigot..

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      Steve Webb

      Here’s some memes that accurately portray your arguments…

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      Steve Webb

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      James Hollomon

      If this is going to break down into name calling, I’m done. I don’t play school yard debate. Hopefully someone in West Virginia will sue and a Federal Court can bring rationality back into play. Good day, Steve.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      Steve Webb

      James Hollomon hopefully someone will get elected that will appoint appropriate judges to the Supreme Court and we can reverse the mess you’re liberal clown friends have made of this nation. Good day.

  • Reply April 24, 2016

    Steve Webb

    But now that I see your profile, I see the problem. You are beyond liberal, you’re a socialist. You, sir, are part of the problem with not only the US, but the entire world.

  • Reply April 24, 2016

    James Hollomon

    I am not a socialist, and my profile does not say that. I believe in Democratic Socialism, and the US Government is built around that. People who can’t think outside hate-inspiring labels are the problem.

  • Reply April 24, 2016

    Steve Webb

    Democratic Socialism…Democratic Naziism…whatever James Hollomon. It’s all the same. Exactly why are you in a theology group of any kind when you are clearly, by your own admittance, interested in cosmology? Are you here just to stir trouble and keep God fearing folks relegated to the closed, back rooms of society??

  • Reply April 24, 2016

    Steve Webb

  • Reply April 24, 2016

    James Hollomon

    I’m here because I was invited to join. Given your hate and fear-mongering, I will not say who invited me.

    Why is your church or your home a back room of society? Do you think you have the right to use the force of government to compel everyone to bow to your particular notion of God. I beg to disagree, and fortunately I have the Constitution on my side. I don’t want to pay taxes to promote your religious beliefs and I don’t think you should have to pay taxes to support mine.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      Steve Webb

      Do you think you have the right to use force of government to shut down Christian businesses, force behaviors we consider immoral, and steal a sizeable portion of our income? The amazing part is this…you can’t see the hypocrisy of your ways.
      I would have no problem with any religion being taught in school, so long as Christians are not excluded. That is the current state of affairs. I have a huge problem with people that try to sway everything to tolerance and inclusion, yet work to ensure Christians are viewed through a lens of being filled with hate and fear-mongering.
      I have a problem with twisting the constitution to protect you, but not me.
      At least we agree on one thing, at least in words, my taxes should not support you, not yours support me. But again, the hypocrisy is your socialistic world view in which we would neither have a choice.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      James Hollomon

      “Do you think you have the right to use force of government to shut down Christian businesses..?” No. I would never advocate such a thing.

      As to forcing behaviors, that depends on the behavior. If you open a business, you should serve the public. If your religion convinces you that you can’t serve gays, or blacks, or Muslims, or Catholics or any broad group, then don’t open a business. Such discrimination is just as illegal when done in God’s name as it is when done on behalf of white supremacy beliefs.

      “The amazing part is this…you can’t see the hypocrisy of your ways.” Best look in a mirror, because the idea that you’re being discriminated against because you are not allowed to discriminate against others is hypocrisy on steroids.

      You’re simply wrong claiming that only Christians are prohibited from teaching their religion in public schools. It applies to any specific religion. You can teach comparative religion, or history of religion, but not proselytize for a specific religion. If any school district is pushing Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism or even Secular Humanism in their classes, you have the perfect right to sue and put an end to it.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      Steve Webb

      James Hollomon For your reading enjoyment, borrowed from a professor of American Government…a class I’ve had, and excelled in…for your remark to failing Constitution 101…… LAUS DEO

      Do you know what it means?

      One detail that is never mentioned in Washington, D.C. is this; there can never be a building of greater height than the Washington Monument.

      With all the uproar about removing the ten commandments, etc., this is worth a moment or two of your time. This is amazing historical information.

      On the aluminum cap, atop the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., are displayed two words: Laus Deo.

      No one can see these words. In fact, most visitors to the monument are totally unaware they are even there and for that matter, probably couldn’t care less.

      Once you know Laus Deo’s history, you will want to share this with everyone you know. These words have been there for many years; they are 555 feet, 5.125 inches high, perched atop the monument, facing skyward to the Father of our nation, overlooking the 69 square miles which comprise the District of Columbia, capital of the United States of America.

      Laus Deo! Two seemingly insignificant, unnoticed words. Out of sight and, one might think, out of mind, but very meaningfully placed at the highest point over what is the most powerful city in the most successful nation in the world.

      So, what do those two words, in Latin, composed of just four syllables and only seven letters, possibly mean? Very simply, they say ‘ Praise be to God!’

      Though construction of this giant obelisk began in 1848, when James Polk was President of the United States , it was not until 1888 that the monument was inaugurated and opened to the public. It took twenty-five years to finally cap the memorial with a tribute to the Father of our nation, Laus Deo ‘Praise be to God!’

      From atop this magnificent granite and marble structure, visitors may take in the beautiful panoramic view of the city with its division into four major segments. From that vantage point, one can also easily see the original plan of the designer, Pierre Charles l’Enfant…a perfect cross imposed upon the landscape, with the White House to the north. The Jefferson Memorial is to the south, the Capitol to the east and the Lincoln Memorial to the west

      A cross you ask? Why a cross? What about separation of church and state? Yes, a cross; separation of church and state was not, is not, in the Constitution. So, read on. How interesting and, no doubt, intended to carry a profound meaning for those who bother to notice.

      Praise be to God! Within the monument itself are 898 steps and 50 landings. As one climbs the steps and pauses at the landings the memorial stones share a message.


      On the 12th landing is a prayer offered by the City of Baltimore;

      On the 20th landing is a memorial presented by some Chinese Christians;

      On the 24th landing is a presentation made by Sunday School children from New York and Philadelphia quoting Proverbs 10:7, Luke 18:16 and Proverbs 22:6.

      Praise be to God!

      When the cornerstone of the Washington Monument was laid on July 4th, 1848 deposited within it were many items including the Holy Bible presented by the Bible Society. Praise be to God! Such was the discipline, the moral direction, and the spiritual mood given by the founder and first President of our unique republic ‘One Nation, Under God.’

      I am awed by Washington’s prayer for America. Have you ever read it? Well, now is your unique opportunity, so read on!

      ‘Almighty God; We make our earnest prayer that Thou wilt keep the United States in Thy holy protection; that Thou wilt incline the hearts of the citizens to cultivate a spirit of subordination and obedience to government; and entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another and for their fellow citizens of the United States at large.. And finally that Thou wilt most graciously be pleased to dispose us all to do justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that charity, humility, and pacific temper of mind which were the characteristics of the Divine Author of our blessed religion, and without a humble imitation of whose example in these things we can never hope to be a happy nation. Grant our supplication, we beseech Thee, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.’

      Laus Deo!

      When one stops to observe the inscriptions found in public places all over our nation’s capital, he or she will easily find the signature of God, as it is unmistakably inscribed everywhere you look. You may forget the width and height of ‘Laus Deo ‘, its location, or the architects but no one who reads this will be able to forget its meaning, or these words: ‘Unless the Lord builds the house its builders labor in vain. Unless the Lord watches over the city, the watchmen stand guard in vain.’ (Psalm 127: 1)

      • Reply April 24, 2016

        carl

        That is awesome, thanks

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      James Hollomon

      Enough preaching, Steve. I’m aware of how often the tyranny of the majority tramples the constitutional protection of minorities. Don’t expect me to celebrate it.

      Though many of the Founding Fathers were deists, the rest were Christians of one sect or another. But they were well aware of the horrors religious rule brought to all the entrenched European theocracies. They saw the troubles that religious minorities visited on theicratic colonies once they had the political power to do so.

      They knew of the inquisition, the witch trials, the many and bloody religious wars. They sought to set up a government free from that, but guaranteeing freedom of religion to all. LAUS DEO is fine so long as you don’t tell me which of the 3,000 creator deities humans have worshiped I must bow to, just how I must bow, and how much of my life and goods I must devote to your invisible friend.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      Steve Webb

      James Hollomon wow…invisible friend. Why would you accept an invite to this group with such an atheistic view?? I am baffled.
      And that post certainly wasn’t preaching…it was a very educated answer to which you obviously have no answer. You ignore everything to skip to the capstone. LAUS DEO.
      You exhibit the same hypocrisy you accuse others off…you disrespect God with the title of “invisible friend”, and demand that I give a predetermined portion of my life and goods to your god, the government. You demand equality for all while bringing inequality to the majority.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      James Hollomon

      I wondered why I was invited. I make no bones about my position. I asked the person who invited me if it was because the group welcomes debate. I am happy to debate on the issues, and if there is a god, I definitely want to know it. Convince me it is so. I just don’t care to “debate’ via ad-hominem fallacy or argument by assertion. But I’m happy to discuss issues.

      The government isn’t my god, and I pity anyone blind enough to think government is a god, as the poor people of North Korea are asked to do. As to government bringing inequality, it’s been rigged to do that over the last 30 years. One thing we have common cause on.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      Steve Webb

      James Hollomon you baffle me. I also welcome debate, but I am left wondering if there is a middle ground to be found here. Perhaps there is, as you mention. I hope there is, and I offer an apology if I’ve offended. In all honesty it seems two stubborn mules are pulling opposite directions. Yes, I include myself in that statement.
      As to your desire to be convinced…you must first have some faith that perhaps things you’ve learned along the way are just not as you learned. Not all answers can be had, at least not in the finite world in which we exist.
      I’m off for the night. Perhaps we can continue at some other point.

    • Reply April 24, 2016

      James Hollomon

      On the claim that a god exists, it seems unlikely there can be any middle ground. It’s either true or false.

      I actually lost my faith in an evangelical Bible college and it was carefully reading the Bible and seeing all its inconsistencies, failed prophecies and flat-out contradictions that made me realize it could not be the revealed or inspired words laid down by an omniscient, omnipotent being.

      There are other religions out there, and some are more internally consistent. But I no longer believe things that require a leap of faith any more than mortgage bankers believe I’ll repay a loan on a Palm Beach mansion on faith alone.

      I know full well that if we diligently seek an indwelling of the Holy Spirit we’ll feel it. I’ve felt that epiphany. I know full well how compelling it is. The problem is that people in other religions are equally certain their mutually exclusive god exists because they sought him and he came into their hearts. That tells me that our inner feeling is easily fooled. We will feel what we set our hearts to feel whether it’s real or not. So it is a poor tool upon which to build a belief system. It leads to failed epistemology.

      In fact, aside from Omnist who make the philosophically ridiculous claim that all religions are true even and all gods exist even though they are mutually contradictory, we all all pretty sure that every other faith’s god is a myth. I just go one god further than the theists who think that their particular god is real. And the vast majority of theists came to that belief not through logic and sincere searching but because they were indoctrinated into the religion they accept when they were children, and well before they developed the critical thinking skills to evaluate the claims.

  • Reply April 26, 2016

    Varnel Watson

  • Reply April 28, 2016

    Nationwide

  • Reply April 29, 2016

    Varnel Watson

  • Reply May 3, 2016

    Varnel Watson

  • Reply May 4, 2016

    James Craig

    AMEN!!! AMEN!!! AMEN!!!

  • Reply May 4, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    On the $7500 fine?

  • Reply July 1, 2016

    Paulette Bateman

    Paulette Bateman liked this on Facebook.

  • Reply July 1, 2016

    Jonathan Reyes

    Jonathan Reyes liked this on Facebook.

  • Reply July 1, 2016

    Nationwide

    Nationwide liked this on Facebook.

  • Reply July 1, 2016

    Carrie Thomas

    Carrie Thomas liked this on Facebook.

  • Reply July 1, 2016

    Robert Borders

    God can move so suddenly and His fire spreads so quickly after a long period of dryness. It’s hard to believe that it has been almost 50 years since we sang the song “it only takes a spark to get a fire going.” I participated in revival fires as a teen and am so happy to see it again.

  • Reply July 1, 2016

    Mary Ellen Nissley

    Oh God! How I long to see this happen in my own community! In my own heart!

  • Reply August 29, 2016

    Louise Cummings

    I believe that Revival that Joel and the book of Acts was talking about. Is breaking out. I call it the Last. Day Revival.

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