Did Hagin use Kenyon for WOF?

Did Hagin use Kenyon for WOF?

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Did Hagin use Kenyon for WOF?

Did Hagin use Kenyon for WOF?

 

DAN IRVING I know the teaching of EW Kenyon treated the name of Jesus this way, and that it infected Pentecostalism, resulting in the WOF movement, but I’m not aware to what extent this is true for Oneness Pentecostals.  The only personal contact I had with them was one or two services attended many years ago when I was young.

SELECTED QUOTES by by Paul L. King, D.Min., Th.D.

In 1914 E.W. Kenyon, whose later teachings would make him known as the founder of the modern faith movement, wrote an article for Carrie Judd-Montgomery’s Triumphs of Faith magazine on the believer’s authority and binding and loosing.69 Before he began to err grievously, he had contacts with the Keswick movement, so it is likely he was drawing upon the principles Roberts and Penn-Lewis had mentioned two years prior, as well as Meyer’s earlier teaching. In her 1921 book The Secrets of Victory Carrie Judd-Montgomery devoted an entire chapter to binding and loosing, admitting it was a recent perception that had transformed her ministry.

69 E.W. Kenyon, “Legal Authority,” Triumphs of Faith (December 1914): 283-284.

RESTORATION of BINDING and LOOSING

Christian and Missionary Alliance missionary John A. MacMillan really wrote the seminal book on the believer’s authority with his series of articles based on Ephesian 1 in 1932.73 In effect, he developed the theology at that time for the recovered understanding of binding and loosing. The seventh edition of the unabridged version of Penn-Lewis and Evan Roberts’ book War on the Saints (published in 1933) makes reference to MacMillan’s articles in the Alliance Weekly.74 No doubt MacMillan was influenced by his mentor Robert Jaffray and the teaching of Penn-Lewis. His material is referred to by a wide variety of contemporary Christian leaders, including dispensationalists like Merrill Unger, evangelical publishers like Moody Press, evangelical scholars like Professor Timothy M. Warner and charismatic faith leaders like Kenneth Hagin.75 Chinese spiritual leader Watchman Nee, who was influenced by Penn-Lewis, Simpson and Andrew Murray, also taught authoritative “commanding” prayer and the power of binding and loosing in 1934.76 So we see that by the early twentieth century the teaching on binding and loosing as the believer’s authority had proliferated among evangelical leaders.

Parallel with these developments, in 1916 E. W. Kenyon, considered the father of the modern faith movement, also believed in a concept of territorial spirits. Theologian and historian Douglas Jacobsen notes, “Kenyon believed Satan divided the world into a host of separate ‘kingdoms and states, and communities’ and gave various demons control over those territorial domains. Virtually every community was assigned a territorial demon to oppress and control all forms of life in that region of the planet.”12

Further Development of the Concept by John MacMillan

C&MA missionary John MacMillan, perhaps more than any other Christian leader of his day, began to develop more of a concept of territorial influences. Some personality trait weaknesses that are usually considered characteristic of a certain nationality or ethnic group, MacMillan suggested, are “quite as likely to be a working of that undercurrent of Satanic force.”13 He posited the atheism of Russia and the unexplainable submissiveness of its people as due to an occult power, what he calls a “hellish counterfeit.”14 For most heathen religions, MacMillan explained, “Every god is confined to definite territorial limits, outside of which his influence does not extend.”15 MacMillan viewed Daniel 10 as an example of prayer activating God’s interference with “mighty intelligences” manipulating people, governments, and circumstances.

A Historical Survey of the Concept of Strategic Level Spiritual Warfare: Spiritual Mapping, Territorial Spirits, and Related Praxis

 

 

27 Comments

  • Reply January 31, 2023

    Anonymous

    John Mushenhouse Ken Van Horn WEve had a significant amount of discussion in this group with DR Paul L. King who has authored a dissertation research on the subject I will offer several quotes here later while searching for the proper discussion archive HOWEVER the connection with Kenyon as minimal as it may be is resulting from John A. MacMillan

    Christian and Missionary Alliance missionary John A. MacMillan really wrote the seminal book on the believer’s authority with his series of articles based on Ephesian 1 in 1932.73 In effect, he developed the theology at that time for the recovered understanding of binding and loosing. The seventh edition of the unabridged version of Penn-Lewis and Evan Roberts’ book War on the Saints (published in 1933) makes reference to MacMillan’s articles in the Alliance Weekly.74 No doubt MacMillan was influenced by his mentor Robert Jaffray and the teaching of Penn-Lewis. His material is referred to by a wide variety of contemporary Christian leaders, including dispensationalists like Merrill Unger, evangelical publishers like Moody Press, evangelical scholars like Professor Timothy M. Warner and charismatic faith leaders like Kenneth Hagin.75 Chinese spiritual leader Watchman Nee, who was influenced by Penn-Lewis, Simpson and Andrew Murray, also taught authoritative “commanding” prayer and the power of binding and loosing in 1934.76 So we see that by the early twentieth century the teaching on binding and loosing as the believer’s authority had proliferated among evangelical leaders.

    https://www.pentecostaltheology.com/paul-king-john-a-macmillans-teaching-regarding-the-authority-of-the-believer-and-its-impact-on-the-evangelical-pentecostal-and-charismatic-movements/

  • Reply January 31, 2023

    Anonymous

    AND if you ever wonder AS Philip Williams about a connection between Hagin and Kenyon’s heterodoxy as claimed by D.R. McConnell’s “A Different Gospel” Paul L. King answers in GREAT detail with some 30+ comments under this discussion STARTING with what Kyle Williams and others wrong assert in the lines of

    When the term “Authority of the Believer” is used, I think most Bible students think of Kenneth Hagin’s teaching, “The Believer’s Authroity,” which was a virtual plagiarization of E.W. Kenyon’s writings. Kenyon was clearly heterodox in his teachings, as was Kenneth Hagin. Therefore, I wonder if the laying of this principle (ie. of there existing an innate authority within the believer) upon Mr. MacMillan is not rather an attempt to sanitize this doctrine from its heterodox roots. As to MacMillan, the article relates he was a minister within the CMA; an organization which became fiercely anti-Pentecostal just prior to the 1920’s (a time when MacMillan was promoting this teaching.) Also, you might recall that when F.F. Bosworth rejected the classical Pentecostal teaching of Tongues as Initial Evidence (resulting in his ouster from the AG) he joined forces with the CMA, and became a devote of E.W. Kenyon. So, I think there is more than meets the eye here.

    ONE does not have to be a an of Kenyon to see THAT McConnell and Hanegraff has demonized him worse than he was in his teaching. Several scholarly writings have debunked their severe castigation of Kenyon and Hagin, including my dissertation, as well Joe McIntyre (“The Real Story of Kenyon”), Bowman (“The Word-Faith Controversy”–he worked for Hanegraaff and found his severe claims unsound and unfair), Dale Simmons doctoral dissertation on Kenyon (Simmons was originally going to co-author the book with McConnell, but found McConnell’s claims unsound and as a result did his dissertation on Kenyon–he is not uncritical of Kenyon, more sound and balanced and scholarly than McConnell). BTW, Simmons, McConnell, and myself were all mentored by the same ORU professor and early critic of word of faith–Dr. Charles Farah, who wrote “From the Pinnacle of the Temple–Faith or Presumption.” Chuck Farah and I were close friends, and he encouraged me to do my dissertation on the word of faith movement. I dedicated the book to him. He said McConnell went too far and was too harsh. McConnell also fell into moral problems and left the ministry. McConnell and I talked a long time ago. He claimed he did not know about Kenyon’s non-metaphysical holiness roots, but Simmons told me otherwise.

    https://www.pentecostaltheology.com/paul-king-john-a-macmillans-teaching-regarding-the-authority-of-the-believer-and-its-impact-on-the-evangelical-pentecostal-and-charismatic-movements/

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Troy Day what about Hagins heresies?

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Kyle Williams as already stated in the article by DR Paul L. King and the 3 lengthy comments I just posted :

      “As a theologian and biblical exegete, I am very concerned about orthodoxy and orthopraxy. And I agree that some of Hagin’s and Kenyon’s teachings are unsound. However, not all of their teachings are unsound. I analyzed both in my dissertation. They have been accused of teaching things that they did not teach. Good honest scholarship is careful to be accurate and balanced in judgment Bosworth predates and is in a different category than Kenyon and Hagin. Although I disagree with some of Bosworths teaching, I am not sure what you would call absurd. Most of his teaching comes from AB Simpson and Andrew Murray. https://www.pentecostaltheology.com/paul-king-john-a-macmillans-teaching-regarding-the-authority-of-the-believer-and-its-impact-on-the-evangelical-pentecostal-and-charismatic-movements/

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Troy Day “a little leaven leaventh the whole lump.” Chewing the meat and spitting the bones doesn’t work if the meat is poisoned.

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Kyle Williams this generalization without actually reading any of what I just posted assures your own heterodoxy

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Troy Day I was in the movement for 10 years and was the Associate Pastor in a church that had left the IPHC to partner with faith Christian fellowship… I’ve read plenty of Hagin….

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Kyle Williams I did not post a single word by Hagin in this discussion As you can read the posts you will get to the essence – BTW what you learned in 10 yrs back in the day is NOT what WOF is today but anyhow… No excuse !!!

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Troy Day the Keswick movement was prone to error as well. Though I believe they,that is the C&MA, we’re trying to be committed Protestants, their Keswick/Higher life/Holiness tendencies made that very difficult. It’s kind of like the Church of the Nazarene. Not heretical,, but unorthodox.

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Troy Day how has word of faith teaching changed? Do they still believe that physical healing is promised in this life through the atonement? That Tithing is a means of lucrative gain? That Jesus went to hell and suffered as a sinner? That we are “little gods” and when “Jesus says “I Am” I can just smile and say “Yes, I Am too.”

      If not; great!

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Troy Day no I haven’t but am quite familiar with Keswick Spirituality

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Kyle Williams letS stick to the research then – no need of speculations as John Mushenhouse already rightly asserted on this OP

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Troy Day agreed I know what I have read by my own research and not McConnel’s thesis. It has been years, but so much plagiarism.

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      John Mushenhouse not really sure what research McConnel’s applied in his so called thesis but Paul L. King has brought it up to the next level 🙂

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Troy Day I understand the scholarship of United and how they are Johnny come lately to the 70s charismatic party. I am sure he is a good man, but I have read the primary sources. I find any further reading of kenyon/Hagin and their ilk a waste of precious time.

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      John Mushenhouse what did McConnel contributed with his research though? Pure speculation Just another baptist money maker

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Troy Day wasn’t it a thesis for ORU? Did Hagin profit. A money maker from the prosperity buy a blessing crowd.

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      John Mushenhouse McConnell did graduate work at Oral Roberts University in theological and historical studies – did he finish? No? What was the work on? Hagin? – doubtfully

    • Reply January 31, 2023

      Anonymous

      Troy Day Do you know for sure. I remember His book was his thesis there. Again Troy please stop as I could care less about the scholarship of others when I have read for myself. Then I look at their works and judge them by my work and not just because they added to the academic speculatory property we see way too much today. I simply study the bible simply.

  • Reply January 31, 2023

    Anonymous

    probably, though neither was a worthwhile teacher.

  • Reply January 31, 2023

    Anonymous

    no proof – just opinion- Troy I am not interested in discussing either hagin or Kenyon as both are false teaching wolves.

  • Reply January 31, 2023

    Anonymous

    John Mushenhouse tagging you only because it emerged in our discussion but this this intended for all participants

    WHAT did mcconnell contributed in his research? AS Paul L. King has shown ABSOLUTELY nothing

    McConnell did graduate work at Oral Roberts University in theological and historical studies – did he finish? No? What was the work on? Hagin? – doubtfully

    McConnell served as Senior Pastor for the Crossroads International Church in Amsterdam. – by tenancy this church one times was charismaticocostal ; their wording of DOF is strange on HSB very strange on entire sanctification

    “We believe that through the indwelling Holy Spirit we can experience a progressive liberation from the bondage of Satan, the world and sin;”

    arguably a very very liberal seeker church by the start of their DOF

    “In the non-essentials of the Christian faith we embrace diversity. Accept him whose faith is weak, without passing judgment on disputable matters. One man’s faith allows him to eat everything”

    and SECOND to none
    7. We believe that
    the believer possesses great authority
    through Christ over the powers of spiritual darkness led by Satan, the ruler of this world. We actively exercise this authority

    NO this sounds nothing like Hagin and MacMillan 🙂Kyle Williams

  • Reply January 31, 2023

    Anonymous

    Hagin, Kenyon: false teachers.

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