Amos Yong: Systematic Theology

Posted by Henry Volk in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

Has anyone read Amos Yong’s, Systematic Theology? What are some (other) good Pentecostal systematic theologies? In Bible College one of my textbooks was, Foundations of Pentecostal Theology. I found it sorely lacking. I’m hoping there’s some better stuff out there.

Henry Volk [02/25/2016 8:39 AM]
Yep, Duffield. Faith Theological Seminary and Christian College. It’s not a horrible text, but it’s more a detailing of doctrines with scriptural proof texts than an actual systematic theology.

Henry Volk [02/25/2016 8:41 AM]
Wasn’t Ryrie Methodist Holiness?

Derrick Harmon [02/25/2016 8:47 AM]
I like Millard Erickson’s systematic theology: http://www.amazon.com/Christian-Theology-Millard-J-Erickson/dp/0801036437

Jesse-Samantha Stone [02/25/2016 9:51 AM]
I definitely recommend Amos Yong’s more recent “Renewing Christian Theology” as well as his book, “The Spirit Poured Out on All Flesh”. Frank Macchia’s “Baptized in the Spirit” is also very good. While the latter two books are not systematic in the traditional sense, they are definitely substantial contributions to Pentecostal systematic theology. Also, check out the ongoing 5-volume systematic theology – “A Constructive Christian Theology for a Pluralistic World” – by Veli Matti Karkkainen.

Brian Roden [02/25/2016 10:53 AM]
In the Systematic Thology class I’m taking at AGTS, I’m reading Erickson, Grudem, Grenz, the volume edited by Stanley Horton, and the third volume of “Integrative Theology.” Not all are Pentecostal, but the breadth gives a good view of pretty much all Evangelical takes on the topics. I had heard at one time that Dr. James Railey from AGTS was working on a Pentecostal systematic theology. Not sure if it’s nearing completion, those massive volumes take years to complete.

Charles Page [02/25/2016 2:38 PM]
can’t top Lois Berkhof’s Systematic Theology!!! Dean’s Gause’s textbook

William Lance Huget [02/25/2016 6:48 PM]
Berkhof is Calvinistic, unlike most Pentecostals.

Troy Day [02/25/2016 7:29 PM]
Dont forget Renewal Theology bv Williams; Grudem, Charles Hodge, Sperry, Turretin and Calvins Institutes and John Frame on Lordship

Jan B Drayer [02/26/2016 10:41 AM]
Grudem’s work is quite approachable. Grudem is charismatic and Reformed.

37 Comments

  • Reply March 3, 2017

    Terry Wiles

    I am partial to Thiessen. It’s also available in Kindle.

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00355370W/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

  • Reply March 3, 2017

    Stephen Williams

    Reading Warrington now.

  • Reply March 3, 2017

    Walter Polasik

    Troy Day: Thiessen (above) is good. One I have found is Millard Erickson’s “Christian Theology”. While he is not Pentecostal, he nevertheless addresses many Pentecostal issues with thoughtfulness and clarity. Anything by Myer Pearlman (and Assemblies of God writer) is also good. (See Ruiz’s sampling above). https://www.christianbook.com/systematic-theology-revised-edition-stanley-horton/9780882438559/pd/438559?dv=c&en=google&event=SHOP&kw=academic-20-40%7C438559&p=1179710&gclid=Cj0KEQiAxeTFBRCGmIq_7rGt_r8BEiQANdPqUjFrmShyOAEp79_ghgL-g4IwDfWeF9JC8oBbbrm1hwwaAl078P8HAQ.

    • Reply March 3, 2017

      Angel Ruiz

      Many of the book for Help by Perlman… are in Spanish if you know any English books by perlman that are still in print direct me to them

    • Reply March 3, 2017

      Walter Polasik

      Angel Ruiz: I have, on my desk to the right of my lap-top one of Myer Pearlman’s college-level books, “Knowing the Doctrines of the Bible” in English, published by Gospel Publishing House (Assemblies of God). I don’t know if it’s out of print now, but a very useful book. And don’t mind our earlier debate. You know I like to get into it. It’s nice to be able to do so with fellow Pentecostals. The church I go to now, while soundly biblical as far as it goes, isn’t Pentecostal. I have not been able to find a good Pentecostal church in my area.

    • Reply March 3, 2017

      Angel Ruiz

      I know it is probably my personal bias… but it doesn’t get any better than the Church of God…. Lol… J/K

    • Reply March 4, 2017

      Walter Polasik

      Ironically, Angel, I haven’t been to one. I’ve been to quite a few others, including the “Oneness” bunch but not CoG. The problem is of course, that among us Pentecostals, not every church calling itself “Pentecostal” is really very BIBLICAL and doctrinally sound. You and I both know that there’s a lot of quackery done in the name of “anointing” etc. Yes, even in the Assemblies of God.

    • Reply March 4, 2017

      Angel Ruiz

      A good rule of thumb but I teach our members when they are in search of a new church it’s to ask are they Full Gospel Church this is a term most commonly used among classical Pentecostals…

    • Reply March 6, 2017

      Walter Polasik

      Angel Ruiz: Nothing beats seeing their statement of faith and sampling a few sermons. “Full Gospel” churches abound in Catholic-loving ecumenism, (thus denying the very rudimentary doctrines of biblical Christianity in the process), they pander to all sorts of spiritual fads from Positive Confession to “the Hundredfold Principle”, to speaking to your checkbook and expecting “gold dust”. Sadly, I attend a non-Pentecostal Church (bills itself as “non-denominational” but, in fact, is very Baptistic) that at least gets it right 85%. On most other topics, at least I get fed there. (Although truthfully I’ve become a “self-feeder” and so don’t rely all too much on the local Church for sermons, teaching etc.). I also attend a Calvary Chapel from time to time.
      As to the type of churches I described above: I’ve been to PLENTY. You could hear my eyes roll during the sermons and practice of “tongues”. (One Apostolic church I was in the person in front of me kept saying “Mummma-mamma-mamma-mumma” (literally). Apparently, this was “tongues”. Yup. I’ve seen it all. So, these days, I just keep my nose in my Bible and thank God every time I find a genuine, Spirit-filled believer or church that does things BIBLICALLY.

    • Reply March 6, 2017

      Angel Ruiz

      I would have to disagree… U are describing mostly Noe pentecostals…. For example Assemblies of God and Church of God Tn are Full Gospel churches…

    • Reply March 6, 2017

      Walter Polasik

      Angel Ruiz: Have you ever heard of a little place called “Pensacola”? Brownsville Assembly of God? I don’t deny that a real revival BEGAN there…but what it developed into….and some of the very, very strange practices, the authoritarianism of John Kilpatrick and even of Steve Hill. ….Full Gospel you said? Gotta wonder. Some A/G churches in Oklahoma for instance are quite legalistic. And walk into the average A/G church, and in conversation ask a person if they know first, how many “Fundamental Truths” there are (16) and then to name them. Yeah. Full Gospel my foot. But everybody knows what Benny Hinn or some other t.v. quack is currently preaching. How is that?

    • Reply March 6, 2017

      Angel Ruiz

      Remember I did not say all… But generally Full Gospel is positive term to describe goods Pentecostal theology

    • Reply March 6, 2017

      Joseph Kidwell

      Angel Ruiz, I have some differences with Daniel Tomberlin’s book. He and I have known each other for 30 years and have preached for each other, but there are a number of area’s where I have significant differences with that book.

  • Reply March 3, 2017

    Walter Polasik

    Above is another good systematic theology. Though Horton kind of soft-shoes ecumenism (which I am against) he is overall a great Pentecostal theologian. (And it helps that I got to know him personally somewhat before his home-going).I would also recommend “Are Miraculous Gifts for Today” from the Viewpoints series put out by Zondervan. While not a systematic theology, it discusses a wealth of interrelated Pentecostal issues from a variety of perspectives. (Cessationist, Open-but-cautious, Pentecostal/Charismatic).https://www.christianbook.com/miraculous-gifts-for-today-four-views/richard-gaffin/9780310201557/pd/20155?dv=c&en=google&event=SHOP&kw=academic-0-20%7C20155&p=1179710&gclid=Cj0KEQiAxeTFBRCGmIq_7rGt_r8BEiQANdPqUu8AkKsHsUI8N-0NbWx648rQZyQDmouf-Toj1nk_CRgaAl-S8P8HAQ.

  • Reply March 3, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Here’s The Largest and Most Complete Bibliography on the Pentecostal Charismatic Movement http://www.pentecostaltheology.com/the-largest-and-most-complete-bibliography-on-the-pentecostal-charismatic-movement/

  • Reply March 4, 2017

    Dan Irving

    I have a read a few bad attempts at it. There are certain elements of a comprehensive theological system that nobody seems to grasp. BTW, a simple articulation of Pentecostal doctrine through recitations to scripture does not a systematic theology make.

  • Reply March 4, 2017

    Dan Irving

    Also, the idea of a systematic Pentecostal theology seems misguided. Pentecost itself, is an element of the plan of redemption. What is at issue, is a systematic theology modeling the plan of redemption (of which Pentecost is a part.)

  • Reply March 4, 2017

    Walter Polasik

    Dan Irving: You’re very precise in your words. Well said. I agree. A good systematic theology ought to be biblically Christian. As Pentecostals, we also believe that all that the Bible says about the work of the Spirit and spiritual gifts is not pasee. So, we Pentecostals simply have a slightly different pneumatology within the larger framework of theology. I have always felt this way. The time is coming, I think, when the church will discard denominationalism and really search hard to bring together all that is true, including a necessity for biblical revival and the unhindered working of the Spirit within it.

  • Reply March 4, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    I hear yall How does this relate to the liturgy discussion here If systematic in Pentecostal theology is subjectionable how much more impossible is systematic liturgy and liturgical order in Pentecostal worship https://www.facebook.com/groups/pentecostaltheologygroup/permalink/1276363699085309/

  • Reply March 4, 2017

    Matthew David Webb

    Dr French L. Arrington wrote a 3 volume systematic theology called Christian Doctrine: a Pentecostal Perspective through Pathway Press that I would recommend if you can find it

  • Reply March 4, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Yes he did. And what a true Pentecostal work it still is

  • Reply March 4, 2017

    Tim Renneberg

    I have the Horton book. It isn’t a bad addition to one’s library. It is important to note that Horton as editor only contributes one chapter (The Last Things) to the book which clearly presents the AG’s stance on eschatology

  • Reply March 4, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Who would be notable the very FIRST Pentecostal theologian out there in the modern Pentecost era?

  • Reply March 4, 2017

    Terry Wiles

    Donald gee

  • Reply March 6, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Earlier?

  • Reply March 6, 2017

    Angel Ruiz

    Earlier than Donald Gee

  • Reply March 6, 2017

    Angel Ruiz

    Have your pick Brother Troy Day

    Cheryl Bridges Johns – COG
    Jackie David Johns – COG
    Rufus Hollis Gause – COG
    Steven Jack Land – COG
    French L. Arrington – COG
    Estrelda Alexander – COG
    Harold D. Hunter – IPHC
    John Harris – COG
    Wolfgang Vondey – COG
    Terry Cross – COG
    Raiford Doc Hughes III – COG
    James A. Forbes UHC of America
    Donald Gee – AG unofficially
    Verna M. Linzey – AG
    Russell P. Spittler – AG
    Gordon Fee – AG
    Simon Chan – AG
    Stanley M. Horton – AG
    Amos Yong – AG
    Frank Macchia – AG

  • Reply March 6, 2017

    Walter Polasik

    Angel Ruiz: You obviously know your Pentecostal history. Good.

    • Reply March 6, 2017

      Angel Ruiz

      In no way am I an expert…

    • Reply March 6, 2017

      Walter Polasik

      Neither am I….but we’re gonna have fun crossing swords ’cause I love church history too. 😉

  • Reply March 6, 2017

    Joseph Kidwell

    Walter Polasik, Dr. Stanley Horton was one of my professors at CBC. He is one of the greatest Pentecostal Theologians ever.

    • Reply March 7, 2017

      Walter Polasik

      Joseph Kidwell: When I was doing my undergrad @ Bob Jones University (very Baptistic & cessationist, but otherwise high level in biblical scholarship) I supplemented the lack of a Pentecostal perspective by reading Horton, especially his “What the Bible Says About the Holy Spirit”. I only attended BJU for 2 years because of their doctrinal stance (& other issues. I eventually transferred to and graduated from Evangel University). But while @ BJU I was very outspoken about my Pentecostalism. ?

    • Reply March 7, 2017

      Varnel Watson

      In my personal observation Dr. Horton never wore a clergy collor 🙂

  • Reply March 6, 2017

    Tim Renneberg

    Myer Pearlman, William Menzies, Robert Menzies, Roger Stronstad…

  • Reply March 6, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Walter Polasik Millard Erickson is pure baptist ie. Calvinistic

    • Reply March 7, 2017

      Walter Polasik

      Troy Day: I agree but his overall writing at least make s you think. For me, it was thinking through cessationist reasoning (& assumptions) that drove me even deeper towards a biblical Pentecostalism.

    • Reply March 7, 2017

      Varnel Watson

      Oh yeah Erickson was taught to every major Pentecostal theologian out there today. There was nothing better in their day 20-25 yrs ago

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