10 Bible questions from ACTS 10 you just can’t answer

10 Bible questions from ACTS 10 you just can’t answer
Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

1. Who is Cornelius and what is significant about his vision?
2. What is the context and significance of Peter’s vision?
3. What about that sheet in Peter’s Vision?
4. What are all those animals doing mingling in that sheet?
5. How could Peter’s vision be interpreted?
6. If God intended to make everything acceptable to eat, why did He declare certain foods to be unclean in the first place?
7. Why would God reverse His decision about eating certain foods?
8. Could the phrase God accepts those who do what is right be a way of supporting the doctrine of salvation by works-righteousness
9. Where do we see the power of the Holy Spirit assisting the disciples in completing the work Jesus assigned to them at the end of Luke?
10. How has the Holy Spirit allowed the work of evangelism to be mobile and effective in furthering the gospel?

8 Comments

  • Reply September 1, 2019

    Lyndsey Dunn

    Why would anyone not be able to answer these foundational questions of the book of acts?

    • Reply September 1, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Lyndsey Dunn for the same reason you have not yet answered them

    • Reply September 1, 2019

      Lyndsey Dunn

      1.Cornelius was a centurion in the Cohors II Italica Civium Romanorum, mentioned as Cohors Italica in the Vulgate.[2][3] He was stationed in Caesarea, the capital of Roman Iudaea province.[4] He is depicted in the New Testament as a God-fearing man[5] who always prayed and was full of good works and deeds of alms. Cornelius receives a vision in which an angel of God tells him that his prayers have been heard; he understands that he’s chosen for a higher alternative. The angel then instructs Cornelius to send the men of his household to Joppa, where they will find Simon Peter, who is residing with a tanner by the name of Simon (Acts 10:5ff).
      2. The gospel spread from Judea, Samaria and to the whole earth (gentiles). In context, He became the first fruit of the Gentile world to Christ. He and his family were baptized and admitted into the Christian church ( Acts 10:1 Acts 10:44-48 ).
      3. The sheet came from above, and someone knit the corners. This is a vessel of God showing Gods careful planned redemptive act to save all nations. The vessel is that redemptive plan of God. According to the Acts of the Apostles, chapter 10, Saint Peter had a vision of a vessel (Greek: σκεῦος, skeuos; “a certain vessel descending upon him, as it had been a great sheet knit at the four corners”) full of animals being lowered from heaven (Acts 10:11).
      4. The animals are gentiles of ever nation mingling a mounds that themselves but. It with the people of God. That soon would change.
      5. God’s redemptive work shown in gentile inclusion and God’s redemptive work in the new covenant breaking the regulation of ceremonial law.
      6. Same reason he gave any of the law in the first place. Righteousness and cleanliness.
      7. Same reason we are set free from the old law.
      8. Yes, but I would not agree. However, All of God’s people do what is right with the law written on their hearts. None are perfect but live a lifestyle of righteousness and holiness unto God.
      9. The entire book of acts!
      10. The Holy Spirit empowers.
      https://www.openbible.info/topics/the_holy_spirit_empowers

    • Reply September 2, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Lyndsey Dunn thats all you got?

  • Reply September 1, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    8, 9 and 10. Acts 10:43-48
    10:43. With the skillfully set backdrop of their own knowledge about Jesus’ ministry (vv 36-38), His own authoritative eyewitness testimony to the Lord’s death and resurrection (vv 39-42 a), and the reality of the divinely validated judgment to come (v 42 b), Peter arrives at the conclusion of his discourse and his invitation to believe in Jesus Christ. Peter clearly attributes “remission of sins” to belief in Jesus only—for anyone who believes His promise.

    Peter’s audience equated the remission of sins with once-for-all salvation. The angel had told Cornelius that Peter would tell him words by which he and his household would be saved (11:14). Thus they knew Peter spoke about salvation.

    Positional forgiveness (cf. Col 2:13) is forgiveness of all sins. Fellowship forgiveness (cf. 1 John 1:7-9) is forgiveness of past sins only. Whereas Palestinian Jews did not start the new life with fellowship forgiveness (Acts 2:38; 22:16), Gentiles did. They began the Christian life in fellowship with God.

    10:44. Luke does not explicitly say that they believed (though see 11:14-17). Rather, he skillfully lets the reader know that belief occurred through the dramatic report of the work of the Holy Spirit (cf. 2:37; 3:19; 8:36).

    10:45. Luke reports the amazement of those of the circumcision (the Jewish believers who had accompanied Peter) because the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out on the Gentiles also. Luke’s description underscores the fact that Gentiles did not need anything beyond faith in Jesus in order to receive God’s gift of the Spirit.

    10:46. God granted a confirmatory sign for the sake of the surprised Jewish believers present. Both the tongues and the praise of God reflected the same reality of the Day of Pentecost (see 2:1-13).

    10:47. God’s bestowal of the Holy Spirit on these Gentile believers rendered the question of the appropriateness of their water baptism a moot point. Rather than needing repentance and a public identification with the Lord Jesus to receive the Spirit (2:38; 22:16), belief in Him sufficed. In keeping with this Peter asked, “Can anyone forbid water, that these should not be baptized who have received the Holy Spirit just as we have?” His question contains an allusion to the Ethiopian eunuch’s conversion (cf. the similar theology of 8:36). It also testifies to the church truth which they would later learn—that, in Christ, Jewish and Gentile believers have equal access to every spiritual blessing (cf. Gal 3; Eph 4:1).

    10:48. Peter’s visit at Cornelius’s home established the pattern for the Gentile world and the age of the Church—belief in Jesus for eternal life; immediate and automatic reception of the Holy Spirit; and subsequent Christian baptism. In keeping with this sequence Peter commanded them to be baptized in the name of the Lord. Then, consistent with the pattern often displayed in Acts, Peter stays for some time to build up

    • Reply September 2, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      3 out of 10? thats all you got?

    • Reply September 2, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day 3 more than you brother

    • Reply September 2, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce How do you mean ? since I am asking the questions 🙂

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