WHAT was Arianism all about?

WHAT was Arianism all about?
Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

an influential heresy denying the divinity of Christ, originating with the Alexandrian priest Arius ( c. 250– c. 336). Arianism maintained that the Son of God was created by the Father and was therefore neither coeternal with the Father, nor consubstantial.

26 Comments

  • Reply May 23, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    Link Hudson have you visited any Arian churches ?

  • Reply May 23, 2019

    Eddie Burdick

    My mom and dad are very Progressive Democrat and they go to a church of the United Church of Christ and they do not believe in half the Bible and my dad said Jesus was just a good man

    • Reply May 23, 2019

      Joshwa Bedford

      Eddie Burdick I know someone who is a pastor in that denomination. From my understanding of it, it seems to be more of a universalist denomination.

    • Reply May 23, 2019

      Eddie Burdick

      yes and my dad is so mad I wont set foot in it

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Link Hudson

      I heat the denomination gets more liberal the further east you go. In Hawaii, they have some more traditional Japanese, Chinese, and Hawaiian churches.

      The former royal families church went to what is now a UCC. There is a group of Charismatics that go there that have an intercessory prayer meeting. The congregation must have some liberals though. The pastor several years back threatened to resign if the congregation voted to allow gay marriages in the historic building. A disturbingly high number voted in favor. If I remember right the percenrage was in the 40s.

      The churches are congregational and a Nacisvelluan thought crossed my mind. Some if the liberal congregations are dwindling in numbers. A Pentecostal group could suddenly start attendinga UCC, join, vote in their new leadership. They might even be able to go independentband keep a historic steeplehouse.

  • Reply May 23, 2019

    Louise Cummings

    The little I read on it sounds that way. Correct me if I’m wrong.

  • Reply May 25, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    Joshwa Bedford Paul L. King

    I’m trying to understand the view of OP, it seems to align a lot with the Arian Heresy of the 3rd century. Would that be an accurate observation?

    I already asked this the other day in this OP in a different matter after reading Link Hudson asking Philip Williams Is the Ohio Valley church you mentioned the Arian anti-beard group?

    what Michael Hazlewood is presenting of course is a Biblical heresy – no question about it when you call God a function or whatever the liberal oneness explanation may be

    As I’ve already pointed to Joe Absher that Link Hudson may very well be cog-indiana oneness or some other sort of strange non-Trinitarian Link calls the creed pseudo-Athanasius and claims wouldn’t consider all Christians pre Nicea, for example, who did not have a worked-out understanding of the Trinity to be damned –

    that in my book is closer to oneness claim than Trinitarianism or even Arian heresy

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Philip Williams

      Troy Day Link Hudson is referring to offshoots of the Ohio River ‘School of the Prophets’ with the same roots as those who met at Hot Springs determined not to be led down the path of organization. Most of these had Keswick influence, and opposed a second work of grace, sanctification prior to the baptism of the Holy Ghost with evidence of speaking in tongues. They embraced the ‘finished-work’ teaching of Durham from Chicago.

      But the Jesus Name controversy deriving from Robert McCallister’s new sermon at Azusa became a, or rather, the New Issue.

      So those meeting with the resolve not to organize, organized to deal with the New Issue. Those opposing re-baptism in Jesus’s Name became Assembly of God. Those embracing would become known as Oneness, excluding one another from their respective meetings.

      Riverboat and tent evangelist William Sowders who led the Ohio River School of the Prophets was grieved by the division created by organizing. His meetings or schools, remained open to both camps. A lot of things developed there that would influence those from the New Order of the Latter Rain and Kingdom teachings.

      Trinitarian (e.g. Charles Mason who had ordained many of the Pentecostal leaders) and Oneness attended these meetings, but Sowders and others with him embraced Arian teachings. They split again when Sowders emraced annihilationism. Sowders also taught celibacy as the high calling.

      The most valuable thing from this group was their confidence in allowing a platform for any affirmed sola scriptura, the Bible and the Holy Ghost being the sole authority. In return for the oppotunity to present, the presenter would be expected to hear his views be cross examined. Those who became upset and unable to control their spirit were admonished.

      They looked foward to Latter Rain, when the complete truth preached by the Apostles would be restored to the Church. It was a wonderful school of the prophets until Sowders died in 1952. By that time the New Order of the Latter Rain begin getting more attention.

  • Reply May 25, 2019

    Paul L. King

    Leaving town this morning so I cannot fully engage. But Correction, more like Sabellianism or Modalism. Arianism did not equate Jesus with God, but created by God. OP usually acknowledges Jesus as divine, but the same as the Father. God morphs (or changes modes) from the Father to the Son to the Spirit

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Philip Williams

      Paul L. King the Ohio River group led by Sowders was binitarian. They very much recognized the divinity of Jesus. However mistaken their views, I doubt that the original Arians denied the divinity of Jesus. They were known for being biblicists, hardly possible for someone denying the divinity of Jesus.

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Albert Essandoh

      Philip Williams The Arian concept of Christ is based on the belief that the Son of God did not always exist but was begotten within time by God the Father.[1][4]

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Philip Williams

      Albert Essandoh right. Go to Scripture “He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation,”
      ‭‭Colossians‬ ‭1:15‬ ‭

  • Reply May 25, 2019

    Joe Absher

    I thought church of God from Indiana was God the father, son, and holy ghost. I didn’t know they were what’s called oneness. I visited them a few times. They all wore the same clothes and dresses. They denied tongues as the spirit gives the utterance if I remember correctly. It was a short stay.

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Philip Williams

      Joe Absher that’s a Holiness but not a Pentecostal Church of God.

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Joe Absher

      I appreciate you willingness to share your learning. I don’t know much about these historical figures. Is pelegious people what’s called oneness?

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Philip Williams

      Joe Absher “pelegious” ??

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Joe Absher

      Aren’t you one of them? I have to go for now it’s going to be a great day for the gospel but I have to go.

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Philip Williams

      Joe Absher

      Pelagian, yes. Not semi-Pelagian but fully Pelagian as the Christian soteriology prior to Augustine has come to be described and attacked by the Reformers.

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Joe Absher

      I was asking are they what’s called “oneness?”

  • Reply May 25, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    an influential heresy denying the divinity of Christ, originating with the Alexandrian priest Arius ( c. 250– c. 336). Arianism maintained that the Son of God was created by the Father and was therefore neither coeternal with the Father, nor consubstantial.

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Philip Williams

      Troy Day Arius, a theological conservative and biblicist, would have been shocked by that description of his views. According to Rowan Williams, Arius sought to defend the personhood of Christ against philosophical formulations of the Godhead.

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Philip Williams biblicist – hardly so considering

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Philip Williams

      Troy Day

      ‘biblicist – hardly so considering’ whut?

  • Reply May 25, 2019

    Daniel J Hesse

    We believe in the preexistance of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

    • Reply May 25, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      3-in-1 Michael Hazlewood

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