WE MUST WARN THE WORLD , FOR THE FINAL EVENT…

Posted by Doddy Howard in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

WE MUST WARN THE WORLD , FOR THE FINAL EVENT OF EARTHS HISTORY IS AT HAND!

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13 Comments

  • Reply March 28, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    tell us all you know about it theologically Joseph Castillo Jon Sellers BTW RichardAnna Boyce will soon be post trib too

  • Reply March 28, 2020

    RichardAnna Boyce

    The Lord Jesus discusses two groups of people at two separate judgments. Jesus’ servants will be judged first. The result of this judgment (the Judgment Seat of Christ) will be that praise and rewards are given or withheld. Jesus’ enemies will be judged last. The result of that judgment (the Great White Throne Judgment) will be that the enemies are slain, that is, excluded from Jesus’ kingdom altogether. Luke 19:11-27 is a key passage dealing with the accountability of Christians.
    Judgment One: The Judgment of Jesus’ Servants Luke 19:16-26
    The parable begins with the Lord talking about two groups, His citizens who hated Him and didn’t want Him to rule over them, and His servants whom He entrusted with money and said, “Do business till I come” (Luke 19:13-14). Clearly the citizens who hated Him represent unbelieving Israel, and more broadly, all unbelievers. Equally clear is that His servants are a separate group. Without going into the outcome of the judgment of the three servants at this time, we can see initially that the servants are judged first. The judgment of the servants is discussed in vv 16-26.
    The second judgment, the judgment of His citizens who hated Him and didn’t want Him to rule over them, occurred at some time after the judgment and is discussed in v 27. That the three servants are servants is clear both from the introduction to the parable in vv 11-15 and from the fact that the first and third servants are specifically called servants by the Lord at the judgment.

  • Reply March 28, 2020

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Judgment Two: The Judgment of Jesus’ Citizens Who Hated Him Luke 19:27 When the Lord says, “But bring here those enemies of mine” (v 27), three things are clear. First, the enemies of Jesus are not His servants. This is a separate group (note the adversative, but). Second, the enemies were not present in the judgment of the servants. These people must be brought to the Lord for their judgment to take place. Third, the judgment of the enemies occurs chronologically after the judgment of the servants.
    Now we cannot tell from the parable itself whether the time gap between the two judgments is a matter of minutes, days, months, years, or what. But we know from other Scripture that the judgment of the servants occurs before the Millennium (cf. 1 John 2:28) and the judgment of His enemies occurs 1000 years later, after the Millennium (cf. Rev 20:11-15).

  • Reply March 28, 2020

    RichardAnna Boyce

    The Result of Each Judgment
    A. The Servants Receive Degrees of Rulership In Jesus’ Kingdom Servant One: Wholehearted Faithfulness Results in Max Rulership (vv 15-17). The first servant gives a very humble report: “Master, your mina has earned ten minas” (Luke 19:16). He does not boast that he had turned the one mina into ten minas. He recognizes that what he has was given to him by his Lord and he is just reporting on his stewardship. Absent any other information, we see this as a very good result. This is a ten-fold return on investment. In fact, as the parable unfolds, we see that our suspicion is correct. This is the best result of the three servants discussed. Every Christian can and should be like this first servant (2 Pet 1:3). We can all maximize our lives for Christ (1 Cor 9:24-27).
    The Lord’s response to this first servant is wonderful: “‘Well done, good servant; because you were faithful in a very little, have authority over ten cities’” (Luke 19:17). Faithful service in this life will result in a position of authority in the Lord’s coming kingdom. In this case the man will be given rulership over ten cities. Because the first servant is the most faithful of those studied, his reward is also the greatest.
    He is given twice as many cities to rule over than the second servant. It should be noted that the rewards mentioned are service rewards.14 This is the same sort of reward as we see after Presidential campaigns. After his election, the new President begins to appoint the members of his administration, including his cabinet and foreign ambassadors. These appointments are rewards for work for the President during the campaign.
    Servant Two: Halfhearted Faithfulness Results in Half Rulership (vv 18-19). The second servant too is humble: “Master, you mina has earned five minas” (Luke 19:18). Since we’ve just heard that the first servant earned ten minas by his investing, we realize that the second servant was half-hearted in his service. Like the first servant, he had received one mina. Thus we wonder what the second servant will hear from his Lord. Will he be rebuked? While the man was faithful, he was far from the ideal servant. The second servant doesn’t hear “Well done, good servant” and he doesn’t get ten cities to rule over. Yet the second servant does get in and does rule. The Lord tells him, “You also be over five cities” (Luke 19:19). There is no praise and there is no rebuke. The reward is proportional to his return on investment. He brought a five-fold return on what the Lord gave him; hence he gets authority over five cities in the life to come. He will not have as great an opportunity to serve as he could have. But he will still have a significant position of rulership in the coming kingdom.

  • Reply March 28, 2020

    RichardAnna Boyce

    When we compare this parable with the Parable of the Talents in Matt 25:14-30 the contrast between the first two servants is even clearer. In the Parable of the Talents the Lord gave “each to his own ability.”
    The first servant received 2.5 times as much as the second servant: 5 versus 2. Both servants doubled the sum given to them. Both servants received identical commendation, unlike in the Parable of the Minas.
    In Luke 19:11-27 all of the servants received the same sum, one mina. This suggests that unlike the Parable of the Talents, we are looking at a group of servants who had equal time, talent, treasure, and truth to invest. The first servant shows what was possible for all of them: ten minas. The second servant only gained five, hence he only received five cities to rule over. Clearly the first two servants show that the Lord holds us accountable for what we do over the course of our entire Christian life, and that our reward will be commensurate with our productivity. Now this is still based on His grace, for apart from His grace, we can do nothing. I am encouraged greatly by the fact that even if the Lord finds that I was not wholehearted in my service, I can still reign with Christ. Now I long for his “Well done, good servant.” But it’s good to know that ruling with Christ is not all or nothing. Actually there is a huge allowance for failure here.

  • Reply March 28, 2020

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Servant Three: Unfaithfulness Results in No Rulership (vv 20-26). Here is where most interpreters badly misinterpret this parable. Since many people can’t conceive of a wicked servant as spending eternity with the Lord and His people, they conclude this servant must represent an unbeliever and then they try to make that fit the particulars of the parable. There is plenty of evidence that the third servant is a believer and that he will spend eternity with the Lord. First, the third servant is one of Jesus’ servants. He was given a stewardship by Christ. He had the potential of ruling with Christ in the life to come.
    Unbelievers are not given a stewardship and unbelievers have no possibility of ruling with Christ in the life to come (unless and until they cease to be unbelievers). Second, the third servant is not one of those citizens who hated Him and didn’t want Him reigning over them. Verse 27 shows that he is distinguished from that group. Third, v 27 indicates that the citizens who hated Jesus were slain. In light of Rev 20:14-15, that refers to the second death, which is being sent to the lake of fire. More discussion of that point is given in the next section. However, since the third servant is not part of that group, he was not slain. He was not sent to the lake of fire.

  • Reply March 28, 2020

    RichardAnna Boyce

    The Free Grace position argues that there is no final judgment, no final justification, and no final salvation—unless by final salvation we mean what a person receives at the very moment of faith in Christ. The Free Grace view hinges on two separate judgments. One cannot consistently be Free Grace and believe that there is only one judgment, final judgment where the destiny of people is determined by examining their works. One can, of course, be Free Grace without knowing about the Bema or the Great White Throne Judgment.28 Probably very few people at the moment of faith in Christ had even heard about the Judgment Seat of Christ or of the Great White Throne Judgment. While the concept of the final judgment is probably something many if not most unbelievers have heard, even that concept is not universally known among unbelievers. Children in particular often do not have a conception of some judgment of their works to determine their eternal destinies.
    Thus some people, like Cornelius and his family in Acts 10 or the woman at the well in John 4, are quite open to believing in Jesus for the promise of everlasting life without hearing first an explanation of the two judgments. Of course, I see no reason why we could not explain the two judgments to unbelievers when evangelizing them if the issue comes up. For those already confused about this point, explaining the purpose of the two judgments could clear their confusion.
    But one cannot be Free Grace and believe in final salvation that is either by works or that is confirmed by works. The concepts of final judgment and final salvation are antithetical to the Free Grace position.
    Jesus promised the one who believes in Him “shall not come into judgment” (John 5:24). The context there concerns everlasting life. There is no future judgment regarding everlasting life for the believer. His eternal destiny is set.

  • Reply March 28, 2020

    RichardAnna Boyce

    The two judgments are the Bema, before the Millennium, where believers will be judged to determine their degree of reward in the kingdom, and the Great White Throne Judgment after the Millennium, where unbelievers will be judged to determine their degree of suffering in the lake of fire.
    The four types of people are the good servants, the halfhearted servants, the wicked servants, and the unbelievers who aren’t His servants at all. Good servants will rule with Christ fully. Half-hearted servants will rule with Him in a more limited way. Wicked servants won’t rule with Christ at all, though will be with Him forever. Unbelievers experience the second death and spend eternity in the lake of fire.

    The idea put forward by works salvation that the Free Grace position promotes sin or is against the commands of God is ludicrous. The Free Grace position opposes sin and promotes holiness and perseverance. The difference is, the Free Grace position actually works.

  • Reply March 28, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    I think STREET preaching is ONE way to warn them Joe Absher but I have come to realize this free grace RichardAnna Boyce speaks of is just another theological joke

    Lets play it out You preach in the street – REPENT but a free gracer preaches in the streets what? Dont repent – you’ve got it Jesus loves you Just do you good works Free grace is all good #naah

  • Reply March 29, 2020

    Isara Mo

    I think the first place where a warning should be issued would be a place or a people called CHURCH.. not the world..
    A sick man is never is a suitable position to counsel another sick man….

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