Starving Jesus? Sick of mega churches with mini substance?

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Starving Jesus? Sick of mega churches with mini substance?

Tired of hypocrites in the pulpit with seedy private lives? The world needs servants, not superstars. It’s time to stop starving Jesus.

It’s time to STOP STARVING JESUS.

In other words it’s time for Christians to get off their comfortable seats near the back of the sanctuary and get out into the world. Authors Craig Gross and JR Mahon challenge fellow Christ-followers to stop talking about being spiritual, and start being spiritual—by rolling up their sleeves and serving a world desperate for the hope Christ offers. You can make a difference.

This book changed my life!!! It forced me to look at the fact that I am a lazy Christian and its not okay. It is written in a really exciting way and it keeps you interested throughout the whole book. I noticed someone complained about how the authors didn’t seem very loving towards lazy Christians, but the authors were honest about that. And, just because they didn’t like their lifestyle doesn’t mean they didn’t love them! Loving someone means wanting the most Holy thing for them, and being a lazy Christian isn’t Holy! And about the fasting, yeah they did not give very good advice on that. A 40 day fast is the longest fast in the Bible, and its probably a very bad idea to do one for your first fast. So, if you were inspired to fast by this book (which I was) do some more research.

I recommend this book to absolutely EVERYONE, because it is truly, truly life changing.

Reed Benson | I definitely feel challenged after reading this book. I like the writing style of having two writers take turns presenting their ideas. I don’t like how the book doesn’t really give the reader many tangible ideas of what to do to act out his or her faith. Not everyone can fast for forty days while going on a speaking tour chained to a pew. They also don’t get into what you’re supposed to do while fasting. Go about your normal day? Sit in a closet and pray the whole time?

Naomi | I enjoyed the style of the book–the two authors took turns writing and it was interspersed with a lot of Scripture. I liked the main themes that ran through the book, themes of digging into the Word on a regular basis, fasting, prayer, and becoming a disciple of Christ.

This book is eye opening, and if you listen to the underlying message of the book, it has the potential to change your life. If you are struggling in your church, or starting to find that you are lacking something spiritually, you might be able to get started in the right direction with this book. The basic premise is that you need to step outside of yourself and start helping people that can’t help themselves, spiritually and physically.

Other reviews have said that this book advocates a 40 day fast, but this is only partially true. The authors have done 40 day fasts, and they write about their experiences here, but by no means are they advocating that everyone quit eating and start doing this. The actual message of the book is that sacrificing will lead you closer to Christ. This is true. If you don’t want to go without food for 40 days, you don’t have to. Give up television or surfing the web instead. Find something that you lean on too much and picture what your life will be like without it for a few days. You’ll (hopefully) discover that these earthly things don’t matter, and that Jesus’s love is out there regardless of the distractions that sometimes block this from our minds.

I enjoyed the style of the book–the two authors took turns writing and it was interspersed with a lot of Scripture. I liked the main themes that ran through the book, themes of digging into the Word on a regular basis, fasting, prayer, and becoming a disciple of Christ. There were a couple of places where one of the authors came down really hard on a person who wondered why they didn’t have a clear gospel presentation on their website and a pastor who wanted more information about their tour stop. It was hard for me to read they this author considered those people (and others who think like them) to be “super Christians,” legalistic, and judgmental. Reading something like that detracts from the other messages of the book, which are really quite good. Overall, this was just an okay book for me. There were things I really liked about it, and other things that could have been done better. The overall message is one that the Church needs to hear, but it came across pretty forceful in certain points.

I bought the book thinking it would be an excellent book challenging the church to get out and serve the poor, the homeless, the hurting, and addicted. Instead it read like a fundamentalist primer in witnessing. It had next to nothing about serving the poor. In fact, the whole purpose of folks getting out there according to the authors is to witness as oppose to love and wash the feet of all people. They overuse a silly phrase “born again lazy” like they are hoping it will catch on. Save your money unless you are looking for a book on evangelizing in a confrontational way.

Bob Blank [07/22/2015 1:34 AM]
Weird

John Kissinger [07/22/2015 8:33 AM]
why?

Bob Blank [07/22/2015 10:33 AM]
OK… I get it now… TV Ministries…

Leah M Grier-Lee [07/22/2015 12:38 PM]
awww finally !! somebody gets it !! YES so sick of mega churches ~ multi “empty” services ! Give me JESUS !

Bob Blank [07/22/2015 12:59 PM]
Ah yes… But not all of them… Also, the ‘word’ has a way of seeping in…in spite… 😉

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