Repenting, becoming a disciple and being a witness is one decision

Posted by Charles Page in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

Repenting, becoming a disciple and being a witness is one decision. -Steve Land at Dr R. H. Gause’s funeral

Timothy Carter [09/10/2015 4:21 AM]
Charles You came to town? If I had known I would have wanted to meet you.

Charles Page [09/10/2015 11:14 PM]
Timothy, I watched the live feed of North Cleveland

Francisco Arriola [09/10/2015 11:19 PM]
never mind i found out

Timothy Carter [09/11/2015 1:37 PM]
Ok Charles when you do come to town I would like to get together ?

Diamond Mcnamara [03/04/2016 1:04 PM]
We wish you a joyful and,by all means a successful resurrection in the flesh without – what you might consider – undue delay

49 Comments

  • Reply November 1, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    BELIEVE ONLY IN JESUS FOR ETERNAL LIFE – RECEIVE HOLY SPIRIT – TONGUES AS A SIGN GENTILES SAVED BY BELIEVING ONLY – FELLOWSHIP FORGIVENESS RECEIVED – WATER BAPTISM. Acts 10:43-48
    Peter arrives at the conclusion of his discourse and his invitation to believe in Jesus Christ. Peter clearly attributes “remission of sins” to belief in Jesus only—for anyone who believes His promise.

    Peter’s audience equated the remission of sins with once-for-all salvation. The angel had told Cornelius that Peter would tell him words by which he and his household would be saved (11:14). Thus they knew Peter spoke about salvation.

    Positional forgiveness (cf. Col 2:13) is forgiveness of all sins. Fellowship forgiveness (cf. 1 John 1:7-9) is forgiveness of past sins only. Whereas Palestinian Jews did not start the new life with fellowship forgiveness (Acts 2:38; 22:16), Gentiles did. They began the Christian life in fellowship with God.

    10:44. Luke does not explicitly say that they believed (though see 11:14-17). Rather, he skillfully lets the reader know that belief occurred through the dramatic report of the work of the Holy Spirit (cf. 2:37; 3:19; 8:36).

    10:45. Luke reports the amazement of those of the circumcision (the Jewish believers who had accompanied Peter) because the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out on the Gentiles also. Luke’s description underscores the fact that Gentiles did not need anything beyond faith in Jesus in order to receive God’s gift of the Spirit.

    10:46. God granted a confirmatory sign for the sake of the surprised Jewish believers present. Both the tongues and the praise of God reflected the same reality of the Day of Pentecost (see 2:1-13).

    10:47. God’s bestowal of the Holy Spirit on these Gentile believers rendered the question of the appropriateness of their water baptism a moot point. Rather than needing repentance and a public identification with the Lord Jesus to receive the Spirit (2:38; 22:16), belief in Him sufficed. In keeping with this Peter asked, “Can anyone forbid water, that these should not be baptized who have received the Holy Spirit just as we have?” His question contains an allusion to the Ethiopian eunuch’s conversion (cf. the similar theology of 8:36). It also testifies to the church truth which they would later learn—that, in Christ, Jewish and Gentile believers have equal access to every spiritual blessing (cf. Gal 3; Eph 4:1).

    10:48. Peter’s visit at Cornelius’s home established the pattern for the Gentile world and the age of the Church—belief in Jesus for eternal life; immediate and automatic reception of the Holy Spirit; and subsequent Christian baptism. In keeping with this sequence Peter commanded them to be baptized in the name of the Lord. Then, consistent with the pattern often displayed in Acts, Peter stays for some time to build up the saints.

  • Reply November 1, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    Jesus himself said REPENT !!!

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      only to Jewish generation who would murder Him; and then never as a CONDITION of justification believing, but only in PREPARATION to believe. GJohn says believe (or synonim of believe) 100 times (with NO CONDITION OF REPENTING).

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce SIMPLY NOT TRUE In his Pentecost sermon, Peter the Apostle called ALL people to repent,[Acts 2:38]

      Hosea 11:5“Will they not return to Egypt and will not Assyria rule over them because they refuse to repent?

      For if the miracles that were performed in you had been performed in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes.

      The men of Nineveh will stand up at the judgment with this generation and condemn it; for they repented at the preaching of Jonah,

      Luke 24:47and repentance for the forgiveness of sins will be preached in his name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem.

      LETS READ AGAIN Luke 24:47and repentance for the forgiveness of sins will be preached in his name to ALL nations, beginning at Jerusalem.

      CASE CLOSED

      BUT wait there is more Joe Absher

      Sammaritans non Jews Acts 8:22 Repent of this wickedness and pray to the Lord in the hope that he may forgive you for having such a thought in your heart.

      GENTILES to repent too? Acts 11:18When they heard this, they had no further objections and praised God, saying, “So then, even to Gentiles God has granted repentance that leads to life.”

      Acts 26:20First to those in Damascus, then to those in Jerusalem and in all Judea, and then to the Gentiles, I preached that they should repent and turn to God and demonstrate their repentance by their deeds.

      Acts 17:30In the past God overlooked such ignorance, but now he commands ALL people everywhere to repent

      GREEKS Acts 20:21I have declared to both Jews and Greeks that they must turn to God in repentance and have faith in our Lord Jesus.

      CORINTH GREECE 2 Corinthians 7:9yet now I am happy, not because you were made sorry, but because your sorrow led you to repentance. For you became sorrowful as God intended and so were not harmed in any way by us.

      2 Corinthians 7:10Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation and leaves no regret, but worldly sorrow brings death

      everyone – 2 Peter 3:9The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.

      Ephesus to repent Revelation 2:5Consider how far you have fallen! Repent and do the things you did at first. If you do not repent, I will come to you and remove your lampstand from its place.

      Pergamum 16 Repent therefore! Otherwise, I will soon come to you and will fight against them with the sword of my mouth.

      Sardis Revelation 3:3Remember, therefore, what you have received and heard; hold it fast, and repent

      Revelation 9:20The rest of mankind who were not killed by these plagues still did not repent of the work of their hands;

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Acts2:37 the Jewish hearers believed and were born again, and for the first time had a RELATIONSHIP with God/ Jesus. v38 then Peter tells new Jewish believers to repent of murdering the Messiah, (similar to 1 John 1:9 call for believers to repent to repair FELLOWSHIP with Jesus/ God). We need to rightly divide when Apostles are talking to unbelievers or believers, otherwise we are chatting at cross purposes Troy.

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy, Luke 24:47 Repentance (to Jews spread abroad in ALL NATIONS) is in PREPARATION for believing; not as a CONDITION of believing. After establishing the basis for their mission—His death and resurrection—He describes their task in terms that will reflect their post-Pentecost experience. The Acts narrative shows that in general terms the nation Israel needed to repent of their rejection of Jesus, their Messiah—“beginning at Jerusalem,” the very place that should have welcomed Him. Gentiles—who lacked the prophetic preparation for Messiah’s ministry—needed to turn their back on idolatry and polytheism. Belief in Jesus represents the only condition for receiving eternal life (cf. John 3:16-18; 5:24-25; 11:25-27). Nevertheless why would the Jewish nation believe in Jesus for eternal life when they had rejected Him as a blasphemous criminal? Thus in regard to Israel the task for the witnesses involved providing the proper context in which belief in Jesus could happen—one where the nation could see that the OT picture of the Messiah perfectly matched Jesus of Nazareth. Similarly in the polytheistic and idolatrous Gentile mission field, faith in Jesus would involve providing the proper sphere for their belief—one in which the living God does not coexist conceptually with man-made idols (cf. Acts 14:11-18).

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Acts 8:13-24 Simon, a believer, is told to repent to repair FELLOWSHIP (like 1 John 1:9); not as a condition of being born again into a RELATIONSHIP, which is by belief only.
      Luke says that Simon himself also believed and was baptized. Then, evidently wishing to learn more about Christ and the Christian life, Simon continued with Philip.

      8:18. Simon now comes back into the story. Having practiced sorcery for “a long time” (see v 11), it stands to reason that he still had to deal with the desire for fame and power. Thus when he witnessed this supernatural occurrence He offered them money.
      8:19. Simon requested this power also, that anyone on whom I lay hands may receive the Holy Spirit. Significantly the apostles prayed for the bestowal of the Holy Spirit on the Samaritans, indicating that they did not have the automatic power to bestow the Holy Spirit of their own accord. Simon desired something not even the apostles possessed.
      8:20. The Apostle Peter prescribed temporal ruin for Simon as his punishment: “Your money perish [apœleia] with you.” Peter had already witnessed the death of two believers in a context that likewise dealt with sin in connection with both money and the person of the Holy Spirit (cf. 4:32-5:11). Simon thought that he could buy the gift of God (i.e., the Holy Spirit; cf. 11:17).
      The only other use of apœleia in Luke-Acts clearly refers to temporal destruction or death (25:16). A survey of all the NT uses of apœleia shows that it more often refers to temporal ruin or loss (Matt 26:8; Mark 14:4; Acts 8:20; 25:16; 1 Tim 6:9; Heb 10:39; 2 Peter 3:7,16) than to eternal ruin or loss (Matt 7:13; John 17:12; 2 Thess 2:3; 2 Peter 2:3; Rev 17:8,11).
      8:21. Peter pronounces an imprecation on Simon: “You have neither part nor portion in this matter.” Both words (meris and kl¢ros) relate to inheritance (cf. Col 1:12). Simon had no role in the (very temporary) apostolic privilege of granting the baptism of the Holy Spirit to new believers.
      Peter also gives the reason: for your heart is not right in the sight of God. Peter thus questions Simon’s motives, not his standing with God. The NT abundantly testifies to the sad reality that believers can stray from the straight path (e.g., 1 Corinthians).
      8:22. Further, Peter does not instruct Simon to believe in Jesus—the only condition for eternal life. Rather, he calls him to repent of his wickedness that his “heart might be forgiven.” Forgiveness here does not refer to positional forgiveness (cf. Col 2:13; Heb 10:17-18), but to fellowship forgiveness. The rendering “if perhaps” of the NKJV actually means if consequently and does not suggest the likelihood of God sparing Simon’s health or life (cf. 1 Cor 11:30). This parallels Jonah 3:9, when the Ninevites repented saying, “Who can tell if God will turn away His fierce anger, so that we may not perish?”
      8:23. Simon needed repentance and prayer. Peter correctly perceived him as “poisoned by bitterness and bound by iniquity.” Soon after his conversion Simon had seriously sinned. His desire to possess apostolic power or authority had bound him to the point of his making an offer consistent with his pre-conversion manner of life and thought.
      8:24. Simon then showed a change of heart. He recognized the Lordship of Jesus and apostolic authority. Simon feared loss of his money, health, and even life (v 20). The fact that Simon lived to make this petition is a good sign (cf. Acts 4:32-5:11). His request here reveals a repentant disposition (cf. Luke 6:45). He humbles himself and requests apostolic intercession.

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Acts 11:18 Peter tells believers to repent (like 1 John 1:9) to repair FELLOWSHIP; not as a condition of RELATIONSHIP BELIEVING saving faith).
      Peter’s orderly and reasoned explanation persuaded the Jewish believers so that they became silent. They had no further argument. Persuasion led to praise and they glorified God in recognition that He had “also granted to the Gentiles repentance to life.”

      The bestowal of the Holy Spirit on the Gentiles furnishes the key to the phrase “repentance unto life”. The narrative complements Peter’s message to the Jewish worshipers at Pentecost (cf. Acts 2). On that occasion his Jewish audience required repentance and water baptism as conditions for both the reception of the Holy Spirit and the forgiveness of sins—national reconciliation and personal restoration to fellowship with God. These requirements related to fellowship with God rather than to the reception of eternal life—a gift conditioned only on belief in Jesus as Savior.

      Repentance unto life here references a post-belief experience related to the pouring out of the Holy Spirit on, and dwelling in, believing Gentiles. Zealous Jewish believers would know about OT Gentiles who believed in Messiah and received justification from God (Rahab, Ruth, and others). Most importantly, they would have primarily associated repentance with the nation of Israel’s experience of fellowship with God.

      These Gentiles had entered the sphere of true life and blessing immediately after they placed simple faith in Jesus—rather than either through the experience of a proselyte (i.e., converting to Judaism) or the conditions placed on the wicked generation nationally charged with the crucifixion of the Messiah (repentance and baptism). They now had the privilege of enjoying enablement for the Christian life and its attendant blessings through the ministry of the indwelling Holy Spirit.

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Acts 26:20 Repentance here is not a CONDITION of believing, but a PREPARATION for believing. Iis not works (repentance) salvation; as we are justified by faith, not the works quality of repentance.
      Paul then defines the geographical sphere of his activity. His stress on “works befitting repentance” emphasizes God’s concern for righteousness. He always wants everyone—whether believers or unbelievers—to do right and grants no one (not even non-believers) permission to sin. The fact that people do not always do the right thing points out their need for forgiveness—one that only comes about by faith in Christ (rather than by good works). In this way salvation comes by faith alone (without any works whatsoever) and yet God, as loving and righteous, still desires right behavior from everyone.

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Acts 17:30 The repentance here refers to forsaking the polytheistic and idolatrous pagan notions of God and seeking a vital and real relationship with the true God. The message here mirrors what Paul and Barnabas exhorted the idolatrous worshipers at Lystra to do (cf. 14:15). While this is not a CONDITION of eternal life BELIEVING, the unbeliever who repents places himself in the proper sphere to understand the saving message (cf. v 27; 10:35), ie PREPARATION TO BELIEVE.

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Acts 20:21 Same comments as in Luke 24:27 previously. He also recounted the content of his proclamation: “repentance toward God (also at 26:20) and faith toward our Lord Jesus Christ.” Paul’s proclamation conformed to the Lord’s instructions in Luke 24:46-49, esp. v 47, “that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in His name to all the nations.”

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      2 Corinthians 7:9-10 Troy if you read and take the the TEXT out of its CONTEXT, you are left with a CON, with respect.
      7:9. Now that Titus has given the good news about the condition of the Corinthians to him, Paul can rejoice. He expresses gladness not that the Corinthian believers were made sorry but that their sorrow led to repentance. The words repentance (
      metanoia) and repent (metanoeœ) appear 58 times in the NT. These words refer to a change of mind concerning sins, that is, turning from one’s sins. Because this sorrow led the believers in Corinth to turn from their sins, they were made sorry in a godly manner. The result was that they gained rather than lost. Paul’s letter produced good results.

      7:10. The apostle writes that godly sorrow produces repentance leading to salvation. While many take salvation as a reference to regeneration, that does not fit the context. Paul is writing of the repentance of people already born again. Salvation here refers to deliverance from the deadly consequences of unrepentant sin, not only in this life, but also before the Judgment Seat of Christ (cf. Luke 15:11-24). For this reason, this type of sorrow should not be regretted. There are great temporal and eternal benefits for repentant sorrow.

      In contrast the sorrow of the world produces death. Mere grief does not cause true repentance because it is not brought about by godly conviction. Death here is not a reference to eternal death (i.e., hell), but to physical, temporal death, or to the separation in fellowship that a believer experiences when he walks in the darkness rather than in the light (1 John 1:6). While this verse is often used to prove that repentance is a second condition of regeneration, the context will not substantiate this position.

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      2 Peter 3:9 This does not refer to personal repentance as a CONDITION of personal saving faith; because we are saved by faith not works (the quaity of our repentance). It is universal repentance, which is PREPARATION for individuals to then believe.
      God is longsuffering toward us. The word us (found in the majority of manuscripts) here is not a reference to Peter and his believing readers but to humanity in general, since Peter is talking about a worldwide calamity. Peter is not discussing the final judgment of men, but instead the arrival of the Lord’s coming, which the scoffers are challenging (see vv 4,10).

      God is in no way anxious to begin the judgments following Christ’s return. Instead, He is longsuffering, not willing that any should perish. The Greek word rendered perish (apolesthai) might equally well have been translated be killed. God is reluctant to see sinners killed.

      What God seeks from men while His judgment tarries is repentance. God’s wish therefore is that all should come to repentance. This statement should not be read as though it indicated God’s desire that all men should be saved from hell, though that desire is expressed elsewhere in Scripture (John 3:16-17; 2 Cor 5:19-20; 1 Tim 2:4-5). What is suggested here, however, is that if men would repent, the judgment of the Day of the Lord could be averted. But this repentance would need to be universal; that is, all would have to come to repentance (cf. Luke 13:3,5).

      God’s compassion is real and man’s opportunity to repent is equally real. Peter is not talking about everyone getting saved, but about everyone turning to the true God in one way or another. The point is simple. God delays in order to give all men a genuine opportunity to repent. The opportunity is real because the mercy is real.

      Undoubtedly God fully knows under what set of conditions mankind might turn to Him—however briefly—and so long as there are options that are viable in His eyes, He withholds the promise of our Savior’s return. But even if this results in another thousand years of seeming delay, for Him the length of “time” is inconsequentially short.

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Revelation 2:2-6 The word repent is used twelve times in Revelation, but NEVER in reference to a CONDITION FOR UNBELIEVERS to obtaining eternal life. It always refers to turning from sins that have been ongoing or ingrained. The result of failing to repent is never eternal condemnation but always God’s temporal judgment on the sinful attitude or activity. This is true whether believers or unbelievers are in view. In the case of the Ephesian church the judgment would be loss of opportunity and witness. Christ warns that if they do not repent, He “will…remove your lampstand from its place.” If their devotion continues to wane, the Judge will close the church’s doors (which He eventually did).

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Revelation 9:20-21 refers to unbelievers destined for hell; not to unbelievers who have to repent as a condition of saving faith, as that would be salvation by works not faith.

      9:20. If ever a passage shows how hardened the heart of unsaved man can become toward God, this is it. At this point in time, God’s two witnesses have been preaching the gospel and proving the genuineness of their words about God through miraculous activity and painful judgments for nearly three-and-a-half years (cf. 11:3). The unsaved have experienced these painful judgments personally and have seen over one half of mankind die before their very eyes (cf. 6:8 with 9:15). But those who were not killed by these plagues (i.e., the fire, smoke, and brimstone) did not repent of the works of their hands. They had no intention of ceasing to produce statues to adore (idols) or of worshipping them, which John equates with worshipping demons (cf. Ps 106:35-38; 1 Cor 10:19-20). In the Tribulation religious deception and demon worship will reach an all-time high. And yet, even though billions of people will have lost their lives, God’s judgments do not motivate overtly religious people to repent of their sins.

      9:21. Nor do the overtly sinful people of the world repent of their murders…sorceries (
      pharmakeiœn refers to drugs used for occult purposes
      ), sexual immorality or their thefts. The emphasis is not on man’s eternal destiny but on his physical life. The issue here is the temporal punishment of man because of sin. If the people had repented, they would not have been killed by these plagues (cf. Luke 13:1-5). With over three years of ministry from God’s two witnesses (cf. 11:3), humans will know what God wants them to do (cf. Pharaoh in Ex 8:8), and what it would take to get the judgments they are experiencing to stop falling on them, but they love their sin more than their Creator, and will not turn from it. As always, “Sin, when it is full-grown, brings forth death” (James 1:15).

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy, is this all you have?

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce YES RichardAnna Boyce ALL I got is the BIBLE and it clearly says for ALL to repent in order to be saved. Clear as day Only an unsaved person can miss it or deny it

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day do you have exegesis for the Bible verses you quoted? This is a theology site brother.

    • Reply November 3, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce the verses are plain and simply They read as they read They say what they say Seems like you are denying whth he BIBLE says plainly

      GENTILES to repent too? Acts 11:18 When they heard this, they had no further objections and praised God, saying, “So then, even to Gentiles God has granted repentance that leads to life.”

      Acts 17:30 In the past God overlooked such ignorance, but now he commands ALL people everywhere to repent

      Acts 20:21 I have declared to both Jews and Greeks that they must turn to God in repentance and have faith in our Lord Jesus.

      2 Corinthians 7:10 Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation

      2 Peter 3:9The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance

      All, everyone, GOD makes NO difference between Jews or Gentiles They ALL must repent

      FOR Acts 17:30 GOD now he commands ALL people everywhere to repent – if you dont repent you aint saved

  • Reply November 3, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    Look again RichardAnna Boyce The verses that you keep on missing

    GENTILES to repent too? Acts 11:18 When they heard this, they had no further objections and praised God, saying, “So then, even to Gentiles God has granted repentance that leads to life.”

    Acts 17:30 In the past God overlooked such ignorance, but now he commands ALL people everywhere to repent

    Acts 20:21 I have declared to both Jews and Greeks that they must turn to God in repentance and have faith in our Lord Jesus.

    2 Corinthians 7:10 Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation

    2 Peter 3:9The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance

    All, everyone, GOD makes NO difference between Jews or Gentiles They ALL must repent

    FOR Acts 17:30 GOD now he commands ALL people everywhere to repent – if you dont repent you aint saved

  • Reply November 3, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Troy, we are chatting at crossed purposes. My belief is our SPIRIT is saved eternally, at the one time event of born again/ regeneration/ justification – through belief only and never works of quality of repentance etc. Our SOUL is continously being saved, and repentance is COMPULSORY to earn rewards in the Millennium. Our BODY will be saved when we get a brand new body in heaven. Without rightly dividing spirit/justification – soul/sanctification – and body/glorification – then we have major problems with assurance of eternal salvation. For example, imagine the discussion of loved ones at a funeral. Was his/her repentance, as a condition of being eternally saved, of good enough quality to satisfy God ??? Where is our loved one ??? How do I have assurance of going to heaven when it is my time to leave this earthly life ??? Can you imagine the pastoral problems this lack of assurance produces ??? Can you imagine the problems in evangelism ??? “You can only be saved if you pass God’s unknown test of repentance; and you will never be sure of going to heaven until you meet God in say 10, 20, 30 years !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Your younger loved ones will never be sure if their papa has gone to heaven until they meet God in 40, 50, 60 years time !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! No wonder pastors are burning out 🙁

  • Reply November 3, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    RichardAnna Boyce I dont think so I’ve become convinced you simply dont believe what the BIBLE says plainly This may be a product of your gnostic dualism or just plain heresy – I dont know and I dont have time to explore your theological errors I am simply quoting the BIBLE It says what it says Take it or leave it A saved believer will take it and believed though for a person who have never repented it may seem foolish but none of this changes what is says plainly in the following verses

    GENTILES to repent too? Acts 11:18 When they heard this, they had no further objections and praised God, saying, “So then, even to Gentiles God has granted repentance that leads to life.”

    Acts 17:30 In the past God overlooked such ignorance, but now he commands ALL people everywhere to repent

    Acts 20:21 I have declared to both Jews and Greeks that they must turn to God in repentance and have faith in our Lord Jesus.

    2 Corinthians 7:10 Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation

    2 Peter 3:9The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance

    All, everyone, GOD makes NO difference between Jews or Gentiles They ALL must repent

    FOR Acts 17:30 GOD now he commands ALL people everywhere to repent – if you dont repent you aint saved

  • Reply November 3, 2019

    Joe Absher

    I never heard of nor seen a Christian without repentance and godly sorrow it defies scripture and common sense . to teach such madness is folly

  • Reply November 3, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    aint just no such thing as per the BIBLE

    • Reply November 4, 2019

      Daniel J Hesse

      Troy Day I agree. We turn from sin.

    • Reply November 6, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      we RE-PENT but RichardAnna Boyce hasnt

  • Reply November 6, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    as a believer i repent (change my mind and agree with God) every day. It is COMPULSORY to earn rewards in the Millennium and a better Christian life now. Si totally agree with ‘Repenting, becoming a disciple and being a witness is one decision’ FOR BELIEVERS, but not unbelievers.

  • Reply November 6, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    but have you repented from YOUR SINS RichardAnna Boyce

    • Reply November 6, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      As a believer i can never know or remember them all. The closer i get to Jesus the more i am aware of. As a BELIEVER if they are a problem to me then i talk to Daddy about them, agree with Him, and above all confess my RIGHTEOUSNESS OF GOD IN CHRIST JESUS. As an unbeliever 34 years ago, i simply believed in Jesus to guarantee me eternal security, I later learnt John 1:29 NKJV -The Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world! including mine. I also learnt 1 John 1:9 not to sin by disagreeing with God and focusing on my sins; but to agree with God and confess my righteousness of God in Christ.

    • Reply November 7, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      repentance does NOT require remembrance but a turn around Its the simple act of obedience to GOD that makes us evangelicals to start with

      IF you dont trust GOD to forgive you ALL your sins in an act of repentance your faith is dead – you aint saved

  • Reply November 7, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    Robert Menzies challenges the position that )iaûq~& does not mean “Christians” in
    this case. He notes that Luke also used the relative pronoun ~ivq with paûrlr6ç in other
    places, such as his description of Ananias (9: 10) and Tirnothy (16: 1). In addition, Luke
    deliberately mentions Apollos in connection with the disciples at Ephesus. Apollos’ standing
    can hardly be questioned, for Luke indicates that he had ben “instnicted in the way of the
    Lord” and “taught accurately about Jesus” (1 8:25). Moreover, Apollos’ preaching was
    delivered under the inspiration of the Spirit “ÇÉwv TG rrv&6pcmn. Thus Luke connects these
    disciples with Apollos, highlighting the similarity of their faith in Christ (hrough their
    baptism of repentance

  • Reply November 7, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    RichardAnna Boyce Joe Absher Nelson Banuchi

  • Reply November 7, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    God EXCHANGES an unbeliever into an eternal believer, with the only condition being believing, never repentance from sins. But as a believer that exchanged person must repent/agree with God to be changed from glory to glory and earn rewards in the Millennium.

    • Reply November 7, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      Then why are Jesus’ first words for salvation, “Repent!”?

      Repentance is an attitude essential to the character of true saving faith; i.e. only those who truly believe will repent.

      We find that even in Acts, the essential callow the Gospel they preached was not recorded as a call to believe but a call to repent (Matt 4:17; 11:20; Mark 1:15; 6:12; Luke 5:32; 13:3; Acts 2:38; 3:19; 17:33; 20:21; 26:20.

      It seems, repentance is included in the nature of faith for salvation; therefore repentance is a necessary prerequisite for salvation but within the sphere of faith; is is a repentant faith or a faith that is followed entails one’s change of moral character necessarily combined with deeds of repentance that pleases God (Hebrews 11:6).

    • Reply November 7, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Nelson Banuchi all Gospels of repentance to unbelievers in the NT are aimed at the Jewish generation who would crucify Jesus. The call to repentance is a PREPARATION to believe in Jesus to receive eternal life, not a CONDITION of believing. It is not applied to Gentiles. There maybe calls for Gentiles to repent of idols in PREPARATION to believe, but not as CONDITIONS to believe. JOHNGospel is only book writeen to unbelievers to believe and 100 times mentions believing (or synonims of believing like following, drinking, eating), but never repenting as a condition of believing.

    • Reply November 8, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      RichardAnna Boyce the nature of faith requires two things: 1. a turning away from sin, which is repentance, and, 2. a turning to God, which is obexience.

      Without either attitude/action, faith is not real, it is not saving.

      That is not to suggest that either repentance or obedience are meritorious or conditions, in themselves, for salvation; only to say they both together make up what is true, saving faith.

    • Reply November 8, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      bible verse for repentance of unbelievers today please (not verse written to Jews who crucified Jesus)?

  • Reply November 8, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    RichardAnna Boyce repentance is a good Biblical thing we all need

    • Reply November 8, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day, compulsory to earn rewards for believers; but nonbiblical for unbelievers to be born again.

    • Reply November 8, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce not what the SPIRIT said to the 7 churches

  • Reply November 8, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Troy Day, The word repent is used twelve times in Revelation, but never in reference to obtaining eternal life. It always refers to turning from sins that have been ongoing or ingrained. The result of failing to repent is never eternal condemnation but always God’s temporal judgment on the sinful attitude or activity. This is true whether believers or unbelievers are in view. In the case of the Ephesian church the judgment would be loss of opportunity and witness. Christ warns that if they do not repent, He “will…remove your lampstand from its place.” If their devotion continues to wane, the Judge will close the church’s doors (which He eventually did).

    • Reply November 8, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      but never in reference to obtaining eternal life. It always refers to turning from sins that have been ongoing

      IF YOU dont connect eternal life with sin
      Well … #noughsaid

    • Reply November 8, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day Biblically the only sin that sends unbelievers to hell is unbelief.

    • Reply November 8, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce Revelation 16:9 And men were scorched with great heat, and blasphemed the name of God, which hath power over these plagues: and they repented not to give him glory.

      unsaved men who did not repent and were punished – you keep on telling yourself this unbelief vs sin dualistic gnosticism

    • Reply November 8, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day The emphasis is not on man’s eternal destiny but on his physical life. The issue here is the temporal punishment of man because of sin. If the people had repented, they would not have been killed by these plagues (cf. Luke 13:1-5). With over three years of ministry from God’s two witnesses (cf. 11:3), humans will know what God wants them to do (cf. Pharaoh in Ex 8:8), and what it would take to get the judgments they are experiencing to stop falling on them, but they love their sin more than their Creator, and will not turn from it. As always, “Sin, when it is full-grown, brings forth death” (James 1:15). This is true for both the saved and the unsaved.

    • Reply November 8, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      ha there goes your gnoticism again

      “not on man’s eternal destiny but on his physical life”

      does it get MORE gnostic than that? Ed Brewer Joe Absher

    • Reply November 8, 2019

      Joe Absher

      “Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which we have heard, lest at any time we should let them slip.
      For if the word spoken by angels was stedfast, and every transgression and disobedience received a just recompence of reward;
      How shall we escape, if we neglect so great salvation; which at the first began to be spoken by the Lord, and was confirmed unto us by them that heard him;
      God also bearing them witness, both with signs and wonders, and with divers miracles, and gifts of the Holy Ghost, according to his own will?
      – Hebrews 2:1-4

    • Reply November 8, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Joe Absher seems RichardAnna Boyce will escape in spirit only his body in the fire perhaps for some purgatory and then back together again into eternal resurrection from which point on his spirit will live in heaven and body on earth but they will promise to visit each other on each one’s birthdays and have cake Well at least the body will have cake and the spirit may have some spirits with no body

  • Reply November 8, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    RichardAnna Boyce I only count 10 in the KJV if you count the once actually translated REPENT in English They are ALL related to salvation and eternal life. Not sure what you are reading down yonder

    The first mention of repentance in the New Testament is in the preaching of John the Baptist. John is sometimes called “the last of the Old Testament Prophets” and his preaching of repentance is in line with theirs. It is translated by the Greek word metanoia, which must be interpreted in line with Biblical usage. (There is a popular fallacy that you tear Greek words apart and obtain a definition from the bits, but this is as much nonsense as is would be in English with words such as “butterfly”. Words are always defined by their usage and context.)

    It turns out that John the Baptist has the same concept of turning from and to. The from is from unrighteous behaviour, and the to is to the “Lamb of God”

    An example of the practical and concrete nature of John’s repentance is found in Luke 3:

    Bear fruits in keeping with repentance….
    And the crowds asked him, “What then shall we do?”
    And he answered them, “Whoever has two tunics is to share with him who has none, and whoever has food is to do likewise.”
    Tax collectors also came to be baptized and said to him, “Teacher, what shall we do?”
    And he said to them, “Collect no more than you are authorized to do.”
    Soldiers also asked him, “And we, what shall we do?” And he said to them, “Do not extort money from anyone by threats or by false accusation, and be content with your wages.”
    John’s teaching on repentance formed the foundation for the preaching of Jesus, e.g. Matt 4:

    From that time Jesus began to preach, saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”
    Jesus didn’t redefine “repentance” from John’s meaning (that would have made a nonsense of John’s role in preparing the way)

    The Apostolic gospel had a strong emphasis on repentance, and we can see from Acts 26 that Paul used an identical expression to refer to the need for deeds that were the visible expression of repentance.

    “Therefore, O King Agrippa, I was not disobedient to the heavenly vision,
    but declared first to those in Damascus, then in Jerusalem and throughout all the region of Judea, and also to the Gentiles, that they should repent and turn to God, performing deeds in keeping with their repentance.
    In 2 Corinthians 12 Paul talks about sin and repentance. In v.20 they are still sinning and in v.21 they “have not repented”. Paul uses the terms interchangeably. It would make no sense at all if in v.21 he meant that they had mentally resolved not to sin but were still regularly practicing it.

    For I fear that perhaps when I come I may find you not as I wish, and that you may find me not as you wish—that perhaps there may be quarreling, jealousy, anger, hostility, slander, gossip, conceit, and disorder.
    I fear that when I come again my God may humble me before you, and I may have to mourn over many of those who sinned earlier and have not repented of the impurity, sexual immorality, and sensuality that they have practiced.
    Finally, there is no doubt that in Revelation 2:5, repentance implies actually replacing one set of behaviours with another:

    Remember therefore from where you have fallen; repent, and do the works you did at first. If not, I will come to you and remove your lamp-stand from its place, unless you repent.

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