Pentecostal hermeneutics and personal experiences

Posted by Библията Тв in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

Pentecostal hermeneutics and personal experiences (Revisiting the discussion on Hermeneutics in the Spirit)

Do they have an effect on interpretation? Should they? Could a Pentecostal hermeneutic with its possible emphasis on personal experience imply following Schleiermacher, Kierkegaard, and others into existential subjectivism? Could a Pentecostal hermeneutic be just another kind of new hermeneutic? agchurches.org

John Kissinger [06/25/2015 6:36 AM]
with a specific question about the role of Schleiermacher’s theological presuppositions https://books.google.com/books?id=ZBYcAe24A64C&pg=PA146&lpg=PA146&dq=schleiermacher+and+pentecostals&source=bl&ots=sT3b_abclq&sig=IYMGKeSYZDorurHtuAJUWThWf5I&hl=en&sa=X&ei=4tiLVb3GNpLRggTBhICwAQ&ved=0CDkQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=schleiermacher%20and%20pentecostals&f=false

John Kissinger [06/25/2015 6:49 AM]
for some say: ‘neither’ Rick Wadholm Jr Monte Lee Rice Charles Page http://homebrewedchristianity.com/2014/05/06/neither-barth-nor-schleiermacher-modern-theology/

John Kissinger [06/25/2015 1:34 PM]
Schleiermacher? anyone? hint: he did shape modern theology

Charles Page [06/25/2015 1:36 PM]
don’t want to harm him with my clawhammer!!! 😉

Charles Page [06/25/2015 1:38 PM]
Dr. David Vanoy knows Schleiermacher!

Pentecostal Theology [06/25/2015 4:23 PM]
What would be his take on this discussion?

27 Comments

  • Reply June 30, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    One of the earliest and most prominent Pentecostal discussions in this group. I often enjoy rereading it for great insights from some great Pentecostal scholars, students and minds. Maybe the youngins in the group can tell us what’s new in Pentecostal hermeneutics today? Corey Forsyth CrossTheology Vlad Stepanov Henry Volk David M. Hinsen and Alan Charles

  • Reply June 30, 2016

    David M. Hinsen

    Following

  • Reply June 30, 2016

    John Ruffle

    I do think we need to consider the contribution that the charismatic movement in the main line churches have made. Charismatic communities – sadly way too few – appear to have had great success in integrating a penticostalist perspective upon the paradigm of the historic apostolic faith. The sad part of the classic Pentecostal movement – and its greatest weakness- has been its denominationalism. God has used the movement in my opinion, frankly, in spite of, not because of its denominations.

  • Reply June 30, 2016

    Corey Forsyth

    I am not much for keeping up with trends but in my small piece of the world, I find myself fighting to pull people back to a more proper interpretation of Scripture. In some cases, it has been to push them to lighten up in some areas but to tighten up in others.
    We have one member who chastises every child that wears a hat in the church for disrespecting the house of God but then let’s curse words fly in the sanctuary after service… Gotta love the double standard

  • Reply June 30, 2016

    Jim Price

    Hermeneutics is the science of interpreting what an author has written. … exegesis, which is the act of interpreting or explaining the meaning of scripture. So far I’ve seen little of an effort to really dig into a passage and develop it’s meaning for today.

  • Reply June 30, 2016

    John Ruffle

    I recommend the Catechism of the Catholic Church (1984 and after). You don’t have to be Catholic. Just don’t swallow whenever recon you spot a bone.

  • Reply June 30, 2016

    CrossTheology

    I think if we’re honest, experience will always somehow influence our coloured way of doing hermeneutics.

  • Reply June 30, 2016

    CrossTheology

    What I think has developed over the years, within Pentecostalism is moving from an anti-intellectualist stand to an intellectualist approach. I believe this is a good thing, as it tries not to accept weird doctrines (for example British-Israelism) but it tries to see if the Scriptures say so, while keeping the original Pentecostal distinctives because those are believed to be Scriptural by many Pentecostals (for example: the initial physical evidence of speaking in tongues).

    • Reply July 1, 2016

      Mary Ellen Nissley

      Yes, it’s important not to put a premium on ignorance… but then, there is also the problem of drinking from anti-pentecostal educational fountains, and the problem of leaning on the human logic instead of on the power of God.
      (1 Cor 2:5)

    • Reply July 1, 2016

      CrossTheology

      God is a logical God

    • Reply July 1, 2016

      Mary Ellen Nissley

      Not always.

    • Reply July 1, 2016

      CrossTheology

      I haven’t seen Him make triangular circles…

    • Reply July 1, 2016

      Mary Ellen Nissley

      He could if he wanted to. Just because you can’t conceive of something, doesn’t mean God can’t somehow do it.

    • Reply July 1, 2016

      CrossTheology

      No, He can’t, since that cannot possibly exist. Stop your “pious” nonsense. Love the Lord with all your mind, not with “pious” irrational claims…

    • Reply July 1, 2016

      Mary Ellen Nissley

      LOL… I follow you…
      However, I come from an extremely “logical” approach to the Scriptures… and they have so much logic that they cannot feel the Spirit of God. The Mennonite church I was raised in can explain every single Scripture perfectly logically, and cannot see beyond the logic, to feel the Spirit. This approach to the Scriptures is what I am talking about.
      Actually, Jesus and the apostles used less-than-perfect hermeneutics when applying and explaining Scriptures.

    • Reply July 1, 2016

      CrossTheology

      They often used the approach from second temple Judaism (forgot the name of the term). The Holy Spirit and logic are not in opposition. And no, triangular circles do not exist. Jesus should be Lord over your mind, that doesn’t mean at all that you put your brains aside in laziness.

  • Reply July 1, 2016

    Nelson Banuchi

    I’m not familiar with the discussion on Pentecostal hermeneutics or hermeneutics in general. But, in relation to point #4 regarding incorporating personal experience in the interpretation of the Bible, I wrote about this on my blog: http://atdcross.blogspot.com/2015/10/experience-and-bible.html

  • Reply July 1, 2016

    Nelson Banuchi

    Here’s something that might be of interest and relative to this discussion: http://atdcross.blogspot.com/2015/10/experience-and-bible.html

  • Reply December 9, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    any morning thoughts with your coffee? Christopher Noel Boggess

  • Reply December 9, 2017

    Christopher Noel Boggess

    I think allways giving this say the lord is most important not our personal interpatation but i do think we go through personal experiences that can help our understanding. Troy Day

  • Reply December 9, 2017

    Christopher Noel Boggess

    Does that help

  • Reply December 9, 2017

    Christopher Noel Boggess

    Im doing a class right now on hermenuetics

  • Reply December 9, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Tell us what they teach is the role of the Spirit in it?

  • Reply December 9, 2017

    Christopher Noel Boggess

    They dont not yet

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