Church of God writings explaining the work of entire sanctification

Posted by Terry Wiles in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

Are there any early COG writings that explain the work of sanctification as a point in time experience after being born again.

I believe that the company stated position is that the experience itself makes one holy. Is that correct? And does that mean being in a state of not committing sin again.

Could anyone clarify?

30 Comments

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Terry Wiles

    Interesting none of the leaders will make a clear comment on the meaning of their distinctive doctrinal difference.

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Terry Wiles

    I’m trying to understand COG view.

    Personally I believe it is difficult for us today to understand sanctification because we do not think with a mindset of Hebrew covenants. The New Testament writers fully understood covenant language. We tend to think in terms of experiencias.

    Scripture says be holy because God is holy.

    Thus, sanctification has personal actions connected to it.

    Perhaps the initial work of sanctification kicks in when a born again believer makes a command decision to live a covenant life. Just as God separates Himself to His word the sanctified person begins to follow in Covenant with Gods holy ethics and actions.

    An example would be the covenant language of Ephesians which says “husband love your wife as Christ loved the Church and gave Himself for Her.”

    Using this as an example some days I’m sanctified and some days I’m not.

    We tend to get hung up on externals while at the same time we understand it is not in what we eat or drink or wear. It is in lifestyle that mirrors the Kingdom of God.

    So sanctification then must start with the way we think – our mindset.

    Peter says (1 Peter 2) that we ought to see ourselves a a new nation or race of people. This includes a lifestyle that may be mocked by the world but on the day of visitation will bring glory to God when the world is judged for how they treated us.

    These are just musings at this point.

    As I said, I was trying to understand the COG.

    Personally I believe there is a decision point followed by a life of covenant commence to God. I personally don’t use the “times of refreshing” experiences as evidence of personal sanctification.

    Thanks for the opportunity to discuss this.

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Charles Page

    COG position is that sanctification is a work of grace subsequent to the new birth. Whatever regeneration is sanctification is separate and unique to regeneration. I thin it is regeneration that we don’t understand. Nicodemus had a difficulty understanding the new birth. Sanctification is clearer and plainer.

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Stan Wayne

    COG doctrinal statement should be clear – it is 3 step – step 2 is instantaneous sanctification:

    “In sanctification subsequent to the new birth, through faith in the blood of Christ; through the Word, and by the Holy Ghost.
    Holiness to be God’s standard of living for His people.
    In the baptism with the Holy Ghost subsequent to a clean heart.
    In speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance and that it is the initial evidence of the baptism of the Holy Ghost.”

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Terry Wiles

    Stan Wayne. The question is how do they know the sanctification has occurred?

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Stan Wayne

    I am not an instantaneous S believer but I understand it to be a type of assurance and heart warming that hits them /

    The vagueness of this contributed to the desire for the initial physical evidence doctrine among 2 step Pentecostals in the early 1900s

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Walter Polasik

    Terry Wiles: For a good grasp of early Pentecostal theology on sanctification known then as “second work of grace” or “second blessing” otherwise known as “entire sanctification”) read Vinson Synan on Pentecostal history. From what I’ve gathered, it was the Holiness churches and then more specifically the Holiness-Pentecostal churches that emphasized “entire sanctification” at the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. The Fire-Baptized Pentecostal church certainly held this belief. See also William Menzies, “Anointed to Serve”. Any writings would probably be found in the early monthly magazines that some Holiness and Pentecostal fellowships published.
    All of this stemmed from John Wesley’s notion of “Sinless Perfection” (see http://www.theopedia.com/Wesleyan-perfectionism). This notion was taken from its’ original format and plugged into the Baptism experience. The Holiness churches first viewed the Baptism sans tongues but Pentecostalism later rectified that.

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Joshua Bridges

    My understanding is that the Pentecostal Theological Seminary (the Church of God Seminary) has always upheld and articulated the Wesleyan position of sanctification. While the COG declaration of faith is a little vague on specifics of sanctification I have always been under the impression that the COG is in the Wesleyan camp and affirms sanctification as including a second definite work of grace followed by life long growth and development in Christ as our articles of faith articulate in the International Pentecostal Holiness Church (IPHC).

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Walter Polasik

    Joshua Bridges: All respect to Wesley, but 1.) his doctrine of “Sinless Perfectionism has proven to be an abysmal cow of a failure (both practically and biblically). 2.) Any believers today who hold to “instant sanctification” vie the Baptism in the Holy Spirit have to account for what Progressive Sanctification, i.e. growing and maturing in Christ and the life-long ministry of the Holy Spirit have to bear on the subject. For the believer, biblically, there are two forms of sanctification: 1.) Positional Sanctification: this is where we stand justified and holy before God due to Christ’s own holiness imputed to us. This is true of every believer the moment they are born again. 2.) Progressive Sanctification: This refers to the believer developing, day by day, a holy life as he/she matures in the Lord and interacts with the ministry of the Holy Spirit (via the Word of God) in their lives. It is nonsense to talk about being made “more holy” (positionally) SUBSEQUENT to the New Birth as that is the point where, in our standing before God, Christ’s own sinless perfection is imputed to us.

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Charles Page

    Aren’t you confusing baptism of the Holy Spirit with baptism with the baptism with the Holy Spirit?

    One is the work of Holy Spirit in regeneration and the other is the words of John the baptist telling us of the work of Christ pouring out the Holy Spirit and in Act 1:8 Christ himself acknowledges this work which was accomplished at Pentecost. Peter in retrospect acknowledged the work.

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Stan Wayne

    If it weren’t that this is a Pentecostal site I would think this discussion was normal

  • Reply October 9, 2016

    Walter Polasik

    Charles Page: You do recall, don’t you, that Jesus specifically said, “Ye shall receive power when the Holy Ghost has COME UPON you.” (Acts 1:8). Again, isn’t this EXACTLY what happened to Saul in I Samuel 10:6,10-12 or am I missing something? That God would give/pour out His Spirit upon His people (as a work of the New Covenant He would make) is prophesied dozens of times over in the O.T. The same Spirit who convicts, regenerates and indwells is the same Spirit Who empowers. Again, this is all one work. That tongues were and are evident in the Spirit’s work on the believer is no confusion to this.

  • Reply October 10, 2016

    Charles Page

    Christ was the baptizer and the Holy Spirit was poured out and this was prophecied by Joel

  • Reply October 10, 2016

    Walter Polasik

    Charles Page: No arguments there. Only the important question is, “What was the EXTENT and FULL MEANING of that baptizing work”.?

  • Reply October 10, 2016

    Charlie Robin

    Terry Wiles This may be a good outsiders observation but is not entirely true. The practice and conversation on sanctification has never stopped within the tradition. As a matter of fact in the past 20-25 years more and more scholars from outside the movement has looked into the doctrine of sanctification and interacted with it as both theology and praxis. One of the last such approach we’ve discussed on many occasions in the group since its publication – a wholistic interaction with Moltmannian pneumatology. Let me know if you cant find the entire discussion – here’s the book https://www.amazon.com/Sanctifying-Interpretation-Vocation-Holiness-Scripture/dp/1935931482

  • Reply October 10, 2016

    Terry Wiles

    Tks. I’m headed to the Peruvian. Amazon. Found it for kindle. Will read it on the plane. I’m working on the assignment you gave me. Hard to get more then generalized answers only and the doctrinal statement as written leaves a lot of questions.

  • Reply October 10, 2016

    Charlie Robin

    Also ch 2. on modified Wesleyan quadrilateral including discussion on entire / instant sanctification https://www.amazon.com/Pentecostal-Primitivism-Preserved-Donev-D-Min/dp/1477557539/

  • Reply October 10, 2016

    Dennis Lear

    My little 2 cents on this. At new birth sins are covered. I stand before in a sinless position. However, the sin nature is addressed only at sanctification where we are put back in balance. Man is a “slave” to the sin nature. When man was created, while he did have a nature to sin, b/c of free will he had and chose to sin. Every person born has this fallen nature in them. What sanctification does is we choose to commit to obedience to God’s word and will. We are put back in balance, but we can and are still tempted and retain free will, therefore, we still fall. Balance puts the responsibility on man while putting him in a position he can make Godly choices that are deflected both outward and inward. As to sinless entire sanctification, is it possible? Yes, God is a just God and would never require anything of me that is out of reach. Either it will be within my abilities or He supernaturally makes it possible. So it is possible, but scriptural accounts and person experience tells us it is not probable. 1John 2:1-2 John anointed by the H. S. commanded “my little children” ( church folk) don’t sin. Use the position of Salvationist , the purity of your sanctification, and the power of the Spirit to live a holy life before God and man. Also, if you do sin, go to your advocate with the Father in true repentance. Christians do not have a sin problem, but many have a commitment problem. GOD NEVER ASKS ANYTHING FROM US HE HAS NOT PREPARED AND EMPOWERED US TO DO. There is continuous sanctification through the word, by the H. S. and our daily walk. You will reach perfection when you look under your feet and see streets as “..as transparent gold.” So I see an experience that begins the journey of sanctification and will not end on this earth. Hope this helps. If not, it comes from an old cornfield preacher. So what do I know.

    • Reply November 21, 2016

      Beverly

      Great post

  • Reply October 10, 2016

    Charles Page

    There are no sins to cover at new birth

  • Reply October 10, 2016

    Terry Wiles

    Comments like that?make it hard to understand what the old time COG ministers believe about sanctification. 🙂

  • Reply October 10, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    Minutes of the 61st General Assembly of the Church of God

    Place: World Congress Center, Atlanta, GA.
    Date: July 29 – August 3, 1986.
    General Overseer: Raymond E. Crowly.

    Recommendations from the 1986 General Council to the General Assembly (pp.53-55).

    Item 5: Practical Commitments (p.54).

    SUPPLEMENT:

    Declaration of Faith (p.4). [48th A.]
    Church of God Teachings (pp.6-8). [48th A.]
    Resolution Relative to the Principles of Holiness of Church of God. (p.13). [48th A.]
    Project 2000 (p.14).

  • Reply October 18, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    Melvin Harter Minutes of the 52nd General Assembly of the Church of God

    Place: Dallas Memorial Auditorium, Dallas, TX.
    Date: August 14-19, 1968.
    General Overseer: Charles W. Conn.

    ” Monday Morning, Aug.19, 1968
    General Council Recommendations:

    Item 13. Declaration of Faith:

    WE RECOMMEND:
    That a committee be appointed to amplify each article of the Declaration of Faith to be approved by the Executive Council.

    The recommendation was adopted.”

    SUPPLEMENT:

    Church of God Teachings (pp.6-7). [48th A.]
    Declaration of Faith (p.4). [42nd A.]
    Resolution Relative to the Principles of Holiness of Church of God. (pp.10-11). [48th A.]
    Modest Apparel (p.58). [48th A.]

  • Reply October 18, 2016

    Stan Wayne

    Modest apparel has a definition?

  • Reply October 18, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    Ref. Modest Apparel (p.58). [48th A.]

  • Reply October 18, 2016

    Stan Wayne

    No access

  • Reply November 21, 2016

    Charles Page

    An early statement by Tomlinson on the subject of the new birth. This could be a reference to the “finished work” interpretations.

  • Reply November 22, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    The Holy Spirit inhabits the body of the believer in a peculiar and special way since that special Day of Pentecost, when He was poured out on the assembled believers as the promise of the Father (Acts 1:8). The child of God (John 1:12) is accepted in the Beloved, Jesus, (Ephesians 1:6) and blessed with the assurance of God’s presence and blessing (John 10:28-30).

  • Reply September 18, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Paul Hughes Perhaps you should review again

  • […] Church of God writings explaining the work of entire sanctification […]

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