BACK to the BASICS: WHY SOME OPPOSE HOLINESS?

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First. — Because they love sin and are not willing to give it up and turn from it. When a man is
done with sin he wants holiness. There is nothing else to want. He who does not believe in holiness
must believe in sin. We have found that the objections to holiness are more frequently the outcome
of moral conditions than of mental difficulties. Certainly, the moral condition gives color to the eye.
“Unto the pure all things are pure: but unto them that are defiled and unbelieving is nothing pure;
but even their mind and conscience is defiled.” A man with a pure heart can see purity everywhere,
while a man with sin in his heart can see purity nowhere. Our likes and dislikes are controlled largely
by our appetency — the things we long for and desire; and our desires are determined by the
condition or nature ruling within. A turkey buzzard will alight upon a carcass, because such is the
nature and desire of the bird; whereas, a humming bird will just as naturally alight in a flower
garden, because that is the nature and desire of the humming bird. The more we are partakers of the
divine nature the more intense our love and desire for holiness.
Second. — Men oppose holiness because of their ignorance concerning the Scriptures and the
power of God. As Jesus said to the Pharisee: “Ye do err, not knowing the Scriptures, nor the power
of God.” Any person antagonizing holiness does one of two things: either he publishes his ignorance
or his infidelity concerning the Bible. The terms “holy” and “holiness” occur more than six hundred
times in the Bible, and are frequently applied to human characters under the operations of grace. If
Jesus Christ can’ save a man from any sin, He can save him from all sin. Being ignorant concerning
the real Bible teachings on this subject of holiness accounts for much of the prejudice and opposition
concerning it. The facts are, the subject of holiness is so scriptural, reasonable and logical that no
one can antagonize it without first misstating and misrepresenting the matter.
Third. — In the last analysis, opposition to holiness is due to the “carnal mind” in the hearts of
men, which, “is enmity against God; for it is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be.”
The “enmity” is innate and inborn, and is not only at enmity, but is within itself the very quintessence
of “enmity against God.” In another place it is called “our old man.” In opposing holiness this “old
man” is actuated by the devil, and is simply fighting for his own life; holiness means death to the
“old man.” The “carnal mind” is a condition — a principle — within, which cannot be pardoned, but
must be eradicated and destroyed by the blood of Jesus. So wherever opposition to the blood of Jesus
manifests itself, that very opposition is in itself the strongest evidence of the lack and need of
holiness. The opposition proves that the principle of “enmity” is still in the heart.
He who does not want holiness wants “unholiness,” or sin, no matter what his profession or
pretentions may be. All men realize the fact that holiness is necessary for entering heaven — and so,
theoretically, all men want holiness at the end of life; but to desire holiness only at death, is not to
desire it at all. If there is a real desire for holiness, it must be in the present tense; and if holiness is
desired in the present tense, why should there be any objection to a present tense experience of
holiness?
How any person can profess to love God, who is the very essence and embodiment of holiness,
and yet be antagonistic to holiness, is indeed a mystery. Or, how a man can believe God is holy, and
not want to be like Him, is difficult to understand. “Every man that hath this hope in him [the hope
of seeing Jesus as He is] purifieth himself, even as he is pure” (I John 3:3).
Many will admit of a relative holiness, but deny the possibility of a positive holiness. To strive
to be holier than in former days, does not seem objectionable, but to insist on being positively
cleansed from ALL sin seems to them a very dangerous heresy. But to deny the possibility of being
thus cleansed is to doubt the efficacy of the blood of Christ and deny the scripture. A heart in which
there remains any sin surely is not holy. The holiness commanded, and enjoined upon us, is: “AS he
which hath called you is holy, SO be ye holy.” “As” — “So,” would seem to indicate that the heart
is to be positively clean. To demand a holy life, and yet deny me the privilege of a holy heart is
demanding the impossible. “Thou blind Pharisee cleanse first that which is within the cup and
platter, that the outside of them may be clean also.”
By holiness is meant a heart cleansed from all sin, and filled with pure love, so as to love God
with all the heart and our neighbor as ourselves. There is surely nothing objectionable about an
experience like that. A holy God inspired holy men by the Holy Ghost to write a holy Bible to tell
us that Christ died to make us holy, and that we must be holy in order to enter a holy heaven and
associate with holy angels and dwell with a holy God.

21 Comments

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    This is a GREAT question IMO Link Hudson Joseph D. Absher People often oppose what they dont know Brody Pope

    • Reply April 9, 2018

      Link Hudson

      Some men love darkness rather than light because their deeds are evil.

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    Link what we are noticing in recent decades is that holiness is not promoted in the Pentecostal church in general. The lack of holiness thereof has been attempted with purely secular paradigms. Overall it aint working Hence: back to the basics

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Joseph D. Absher

    More please!

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Joseph D. Absher

    Good morning brother Link

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    Thanks for the like Tim Law Tell us how what you think

    • Reply April 9, 2018

      Tim Law

      People have seemed to always justify sin. If I were the devil I would filter my way into main line denominations and change their theology to suit their sin. There is a lot of graven images created by “theologians”. They have created a god to suit their sin thus breaking the 2nd commandment.

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Joseph D. Absher

    It’s not just a great question it’s a great answer.

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    love to see people who call themselves God chasers run way from sanctification today God will get ya get ya get ya 🙂

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Joseph D. Absher

    How’d you like to preach like that!

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    I would like to preach like that calmly but I just cant

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Joseph D. Absher

    Thou art mad!

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    Melvin Harter
    I cant keep calm
    God entirely sanctified me

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Joseph D. Absher

    Calm on the inside burning on the outside!

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    Nope. The prophet said like a fire shut up in my bones

    • Reply April 9, 2018

      Joseph D. Absher

      If I remember correctly that was from holding it in.

      Jeremiah 20:9 KJV — Then I said, I will not make mention of him, nor speak any more in his name. But his word was in mine heart as a burning fire shut up in my bones, and I was weary with forbearing, and I could not stay.

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Joseph D. Absher

    I was preaching last night about preparing your heart and mind to stand before Jesus renounce sin asking God to take that pride and hell and unforgiveness. And all the hardships and sacrifices. I preached as hard as could hell and wrath I threw everything I had at them. They loved it

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    yes you were
    yes they did
    yes It’s all private

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Joseph D. Absher

    Same message different verse

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    Greek Words About Sanctification

    The New Testament Greek word for “sanctify” is “hagiazo”. “Hagiazo” means
    2
    “consecrate, dedicate…purify” 1 or “to set apart to God”, when used in relation to the sanctification of people. Forms of “hagiazo” are also used in reference to things (see Matthew 23:19, 1 Timothy 4:5), Jesus as Lord in our hearts (see 1 Peter 3:15) and God’s Name (see Matthew 6:9).
    According to Vine, the Greek word for sanctification which is “hagiasmos” means “(a) separation to God, 1 Corinthians 1:30; 2 Thessalonians 2:13; 1 Peter 1:2; (b) the course of life befitting those so separated, 1 Thessalonians 4:3, 4, 7; Romans 6:19, 22; 1 Timothy 2:15; Hebrews 12:14.” 3 Vine states, “Sanctification is thus the state predetermined by God for believers, into which in grace He calls them, and in which they begin their Christian course and so pursue it”. 4
    The main New Testament Greek word for “holy” is “hagios”. “Hagios” means “being holy in the sense of superior moral qualities and possessing essential divine qualities in contrast with what is human”. 5 Forms of “hagios” are used to refer to the absolute purity or holiness of God the Father (see John 17:11), the Lord Jesus Christ (see Luke 1:35, Acts 3:14, 4:27 and 4:30) and the Spirit of God when He is called the “Holy” Spirit (see Matthew 1:18, 1:20 and many other verses).
    In the New Testament, the words “saint” or “saints” are translations of a number of words derived from the Greek word “hagios”. These specific words derived from “hagios” refer to “human beings consecrated to God, holy”. 6 Vine says that when applied to believers, the word “saints” means “all such and is not applied merely to persons of exceptional holiness, or to those who, having died, were characterised by exceptional acts of ‘saintliness.’ ” 7
    Vine also says “hagios” means “separated from sin and therefore consecrated to God…This sainthood is not an attainment, it is a state into which God in grace calls men.” 8 Forms of the Greek word “hagios” are also used in the Scriptures to refer to things dedicated to God (see Matthew 24:15, Acts 6:13 and Revelation 21:2), to angels who are God’s servants (see Mark 8:38, Acts 10:22) and to describe our faith (see Jude 20).
    Another Greek word “hagiosune” means “holiness”. 9 A form of the word “hagiosune” is used in Romans 1:4 in relationship to the Holy Spirit and Jesus Christ. In 2 Corinthians 7:1, a form of “hagiosune” and in 1 Thessalonians 3:13 “hagiosune” are used in relation to the holiness or purity of God being manifested in believers’ hearts.
    1
    Bauer, pages 8-9.
    2
    Vine, page 307.
    3
    Ibid, page 545.
    4
    Ibid, page 307.
    5
    Louw and Nida, page 745.
    6
    Bauer, page 9.
    7
    Vine, page 544.
    8
    Ibid, pages 307-308.
    9
    Bauer, page 10.
    Another New Testament Greek word is “hagiotes” which also means “holiness”. Forms of the word “hagiotes” are used of God’s nature in Hebrews 12:10 and of the manifestation of God’s holy nature in the conduct of Paul and his fellow workers in 2 Corinthians 1:12.
    The words “hagiazo”, “hagiasmos”, “hagiosune” and “hagiotes” are derived from the word “hagios”. The word “hagios” is derived from the same Greek word that the Greek word “hagnos” is derived. 10 “Hagnos” means “pure, holy” 11 or “being without moral defect or blemish and hence pure”. 12 “Hagnos” or forms of it are used in Philippians 4:8, 1 Timothy 5:22, James 3:17 and 1 John 3:3. 1 Timothy 5:22 says: “…keep yourself pure.”
    Words related to purity or cleansing which are derived from “hagnos” are “hagneia”, “hagnizo” and “hagnotes”. Vine says “hagneia” refers to “chastity which excludes all impurity of spirit, manner or act”. 13 “Chastity” means “purity, avoidance of unlawful sexual intercourse”. “Hagneia” is used in 1 Timothy 4:12 and 5:2. In 1 Timothy 5:2, Paul commanded Timothy to relate to younger women with absolute purity: “the older women as mothers, the younger as sisters, with all purity.”
    “Hagnizo” means “to purify, cleanse from defilement”. 14 Forms of “hagnizo” are used in James 4:8, 1 Peter 1:22 and 1 John 3:3. “Hagnotes” means “purity”. 15 A form of the word “hagnotes” is used in 2 Corinthians 6:6.
    The Greek adjective “hosios” is used of God in Revelation 15:4 and 16:5 and of Christ in Hebrews 7:26. In these three contexts, “hosios” means “being holy in the sense of superior moral qualities and possessing certain essentially divine qualities in contrast to what is human”16 or “supremely holy”. 17 A form of the word “hosios” is used in Titus 1:8 to refer to holiness of character and life and “being pleasing to God”. 18
    The Greek word “hosiotes” is derived from “hosios”. Bauer argues that in Luke 1:75, the form of the word “hosiotes” here means “holiness of life”. 19 Luke 1:74-75 says in part, “might serve Him without fear, in holiness and righteousness before Him all the days of our life.” A form of the Greek word “hosiotes” is also used in Ephesians 4:24 to refer to the true God-given holy nature of the new man in Christ.
    The Greek adverb “hosios” is also derived from the Greek adjective “hosios”. The adverb “hosios” means “in a manner pleasing to God, in a holy manner” 20 or “pure from evil conduct and observant of God’s will”. 21 “Hosios” is translated as “devoutly” in the New King James Version of 1 Thessalonians 2:10: “You are witnesses, and God also, how devoutly and justly and blamelessly we behaved ourselves among you who believe.”
    10
    Vine, page 498.
    11
    Bauer, page 12.
    12
    Louw and Nida, page 746.
    13
    Vine, page 498.
    14
    Ibid, page 499.
    15
    Bauer, page 12.
    16
    Louw and Nida, page 745.
    17
    Perschbacher, page 298.
    18
    Bauer, page 583.
    19
    Ibid, page 585.
    20 Ibid. 21
    Vine, page 308.

  • Reply April 9, 2018

    Joseph D. Absher

    P.m about the grinder

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