13 Bible questions from ACTS 8 you just can’t answer

13 Bible questions from ACTS 8 you just can’t answer
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13 Bible questions from ACTS 8 you just can’t answer

  1. What were Simon’s motives in seeking the Spirit?
  2. Why did the Spirit not come on those who were baptized in water right away?
  3. What was the importance of the story of the eunuch?
  4. Could it be that Peter and John controlled who received the Spirit of God?
  5. who is worthy of Christ’s love?
  6. The story of the Eunuch is also a story that answers the question of what was Philip willing to risk for the gospel?
  7. With Luke’s overarching theme of going into the entire world spreading the Gospel, what does our first scene outside of Jerusalem being in Samaria tell a reader?
  8. Why did Luke start his readers on the Gospel journey by taking them first to Samaria begs the question?
  9. Why did Luke choose Phillip in the first place? Why did Luke place Phillip in Samaria?
  10. And why does the scene in Samaria include a Samaritan magician and an Ethiopian eunuch?
  11. Why did Philip baptize Simon the Sorcerer?
  12. Philip was Spirit-filled and capable of praying for the new converts, why do Peter and John go to Samaria?
  13. Why does Philip disappear?

12 Comments

  • Reply August 30, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    just 13 but most are failing them Joe Absher

  • Reply August 30, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    7. The Great Commission applied to Jews to go to ends of the earth to save dispersed Jews. Secondarily it has teaching for the church today. Acts 8:6-:8 Philip’s preaching about Christ obtained a positive response from the Samaritans so that multitudes with one accord heeded his words. God validated Philip’s proclamation with confirmatory signs so that his audiences heard and saw the miracles (cf. 2:22,43; 4:16,30; 5:12; 6:8; 7:36; 14:3; 15:12,22) which he did.

    8:7. Luke records that many had unclean spirits or demons (cf. Luke 9:42 for the identification of both terms) that came out as a result of Philip’s God-ordained and Spirit-empowered ministry. The NKJV rendering—were possessed—reflects the Greek phrase having unclean spirits in the narrative. These unclean spirits would cry out as they exited—apparently as clear evidence of their departure. Further, many who were paralyzed and lame were healed. The variety of beneficial results both spiritual and physical that accompanied Philip’s ministry identifies his work with that of the Twelve and consequently then with Jesus Himself.

    8:8. Philip’s ministry produced great joy in Samaria, a city where nondeported Jews centuries earlier had intermarried with war captives from other countries resettled in northern Israel by the Assyrians. The spread of the gospel to their mixed culture brings the narrative closer to the reaching of pure Gentiles with the good news about the Savior Jesus Christ. Their great joy reflects both their secure salvation and certain deliverance effected there by God in His grace.

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      how is that even possible for us today?

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      we should rightly divide Scripture where it relates to Israel being finally saved in the Tribulation in GOD’s timing; and not try and apply Israel’s parables to the Pentecostal church today in OUR timing. It affects how we view Israel today and will be blessed in our judgement, as sheep, who support her.

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      where does it relate to Israel being finally saved in the Tribulation ? do you mean without repentance and a Savior ?

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day Matthew 24:29-31
      “All the tribes of the earth will mourn” in response to the visible power and glory of this unparalleled event (v 30; cf. Zech 12:10). To suggest that these words refer figuratively to a nonliteral “coming of Christ” to destroy Jerusalem in AD 70 does injustice to the context and to the ultimate victory of God in human history. The parting of the Red Sea as a climax of previous miracles was a literal, spectacular deliverance for Israel and a stupendous judgment on Egypt, their oppressors (Ex 14). When all Israel turns to Christ in the end times and is saved, could there be any less a demonstration of miraculous power on earth than that wielded by the King of kings and Lord of Lords (Rev 19:16)?

      24:31. The harvest of the saved will begin with an exercise of royal authority. Jesus will dispatch “angels to gather the elect,” God’s chosen people, Israel (cf. Isa 27:12-13; 65:9). Israel is now scattered to “the four winds” (i.e., the remotest parts of the earth in all directions) because of her disobedience (Deut 28:64-67; Ezek 37:21-22; Luke 21:24), but then she will be placed in her land (Isa 11:11-16; Jer 16:14-15; Ezek 37:21-22,25; 39:27-28). As a trumpet was used in ancient Israel to call Israel to assemble (Num 10:1-10), so a trumpet will announce the gathering of Messiah’s people at His coming. It no doubt will celebrate a great military triumph and deliverance as well (cf. Zech 9:14-16). At this point Israel’s time of tribulation will be over because the nation will have been rescued (Matt 24:13). The use of the trumpet may indicate that Jesus’ coming will be heard as well as seen.

      Since the Church will have already been caught up in the Rapture and gathered to Christ prior to the Tribulation (1 Thess 4:13-18; 5:9), this gathering does not apply to them. The last trumpet of the Church Age mentioned in 1 Cor 15:52 is not the same as the trumpet described here. This trumpet is blown at the end of the Tribulation.

      In most of the following series of illustrations and parables, Jesus draws contrasts between those who are faithful, prepared, and watchful and those who are not. The outcome is reward or retribution. Expecting or not expecting Christ’s return makes a large difference in the lives of those illustrated. Just as unbelievers can suffer loss by not being prepared (Matt 24:39-41; 25:41,46), it is possible for believers to suffer loss, too, although not the kind suffered by unbelievers (24:43,51; 25:12,30). This loss is assumed by the admonitions directed toward believers to watch and be ready (24:42,44; 25:13). Since believers who are prompted to faithfulness by watching are rewarded, the implication is that believers who fail to watch and thus act like unbelievers will suffer loss of rewards.
      (from The Grace New Testament Commentary, Copyright © 2010 by Grace Evangelical Society. All rights reserved.)

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce you didnt answer my question again – just a copy paste you may have not even read

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day when i say saved, of course i mean by belief in Jesus as their personal Saviour; but NOT with repentance being a CONDITION of believing; only a PREPARATION for believing so they would not be a stumbling block to the GENTILES for the Jews murdering God.

  • Reply August 31, 2019

    Joe Absher

    I had my test already today. Almost flunked. But 1 spared tonight. Jesus is that good!

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      you and Isara Mo may fail this class after all

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Joe Absher

      Proverbs 27:20 KJV — Hell and destruction are never full; so the eyes of man are never satisfied.

  • Reply August 31, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    11. Acts 8:16-17
    The Holy Spirit had not yet fallen upon any of the Samaritan believers. They had only been baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. Unlike the Palestinian Jews of Acts 2, (who needed to repent of murdering God and be baptised) the Samaritans did not need to meet any additional condition in order to receive the Holy Spirit. Nevertheless the bestowal by the hands of the apostles would aid in preserving the unity of the Church in these early days. It would also validate the authority of the Twelve and Jerusalem as the source of correct doctrine. This explains both the delay in their reception of the Spirit and the laying on of hands for the granting of the Spirit with them.

    8:17. The narrative shows the Samaritans as passive in this process. God had already given them eternal life (regeneration) as result of simply believing in Jesus. Now the apostles laid hands on them (including Simon, whom in v 13 Luke said both believed and was baptized) and they received the Holy Spirit.

    These details contradict any interpretation that renders Simon an unbeliever. Luke highlights Simon’s belief (v 13) without differentiating his faith, baptism, or reception of the Spirit from that of the other Samaritan believers.

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