Yahweh or Jehovah?

Yahweh or Jehovah?
Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

YHWH = Yahweh or Yehovah?

37 Comments

  • Reply August 12, 2018

    Guest;

    No J in Hebrew. So it’s Yehovah. But Yehovah is man made name not Gods name.

  • Reply August 12, 2018

    Guest;

    Batterson, in his book “Whisper,” points out that YHWH is the sound a breath makes

  • Reply August 12, 2018

    Guest;

    Jesus and Yahweh are one
    He who has seen YHWH has seen Jesus

  • Reply August 17, 2018

    Guest;

    Tom Steele may disagree with @charles page

  • Reply August 17, 2018

    Guest;

  • Reply October 7, 2018

    Guest;

    On old thread, but I’ll tell you what I learned in Hebrew class at UGA. The professor was a really good teacher. I think he went to Hebrew Union, which is or was supposed to be top notch in Hebrew academia for Hebrew profs to graduate from along with Harvard and other schools like that. One of the other profs went to Harvard.

    Anyway, the professor said that the Hebrew (of course) was not originally written with vowels. It is believed that the name of God was pronounced Yahweh. The Jewish Masoretes added the vowel pointing system to the Bible in the 300’s, presumably to preserve traditional pronunciation. But since Jews did not want to say the name of God, they said ‘Adonai’ instead. So Jews would put the letters for ‘Adonai’, which means lord, under the divine name so that they would not pronounce it. The vowels do not really match up with the consunants for YHWH according to the pronunciation system. My professor said an Italian monk in the 1500s transcribed the consonants together with the Masoretic vowels to create what came into English as ‘Jehovah.’

    Ashkenazic pronunciation is to pronounce ‘waw’ in Hebrew with two ‘v’ sounds. The original pronunciation may have been a ‘w’ sound. Maybe the ‘w’ and ‘v’ sounds got mixed up from Germanic influence or influence from other European languages. ‘Y’ came into ‘English’ as a ‘J’ sound as an initial consonant. If I remember right a/e are the same sound in Hebrew, or can be.

    I do not agree with all the conclusions of these smart alecy mythical Lutheran twins, but they get some of it right. I thought it was silly that they said Hebrew was originally written without vowels because it was easier to transcribe. Maybe the creator of the cartoon did not realize the vowel system was created later or just made a strange bit of distracting speculation.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__7t_bGI8oo

  • Reply October 7, 2018

    Guest;

  • Reply October 7, 2018

    Guest;

    Link is pretty much right about this… all of those points he made and more are detailed in the article I shared. It does appear, however, that there were vowels in Hebrew before the creation of the vowel marking system. It seems there were some Hebrew characters that served as both vowels and consonants, much like the letter ‘Y’ in English.

    Josephus said that the proper name of God was made up of four vowels. I have traced this to a conclusion that the Yod-Hey-Waw-Hey, all being among the characters that shared the vowel characteristic at times, would be the four vowels he alluded to.

    This further lends credibility to the name being pronounced something like “Yah-Weh”. I recommend reading the article I posted, it is filled with a lot of interesting points about the name of God and the controversy between “Jehovah” and “Yahweh”.

  • Reply October 7, 2018

    Guest;

    I don’t know why Hebrew sound does have VOWELS. But they say it doesn’t. Because Yahweh has an E. Well Perry Stone, can answer those things for you.

  • Reply October 9, 2018

    Guest;

    In studying about the woman with an issue of blood. I looked it up and I have heard it preached. That the Prayer Shawl that the Jews wore. The strands of thread that they knitted or put on every Prayer Shawl had knots with those letters in each strand that hung down in the comets of their Prayer Shawl. Had those letters made in every one. So I was thinking. The woman with the issue of blood. No wonder she said , if I can touch the hem of His garment. She would be healed. It’s because she knew Gods Name was in every strain hang down, she would be touching God. I believe that’s the reason she wanted to touch His Hem. She would be touching His Name. It makes a lot of sense to me. She could haves touched Him anywhere. And with faith faith she could have been. But she wanted to touch His Him. And He was The Word made flesh. She touched Him. And was made whole.

  • Reply October 9, 2018

    Guest;

    I found the truth

  • Reply October 9, 2018

    Guest;

  • Reply October 9, 2018

    Guest;

  • Reply October 9, 2018

    Guest;

  • Reply October 9, 2018

    Guest;

  • Reply October 9, 2018

    Guest;

    God likes the name of Jesus. it’s the devil that don’t like it.

  • Reply October 9, 2018

    Guest;

    My face book has been hacked. I wrote a message on my page. But they are still doing it. I might have to change my number. If I can remember it. But that sounds like just what I was talking about. I love study like that. But I have you get all this stuff cleared first. Thank you so much. You have already helped. Just printing where it’s found in the Old Testament. Thanks again.

  • Reply October 9, 2018

    Guest;

    I wouldn’t go that far

  • Reply April 6, 2019

    Robert Erwine

    moses ” hey let’s see some ID here “

    • Reply April 6, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Tom Steele had some good words on this

  • Reply April 6, 2019

    Steve Losee

    “Jehovah” is a Latin construct, and as such, can’t possibly be Scriptural or accurate. “Yahweh” is the modern Hebrew word for “I AM” (Ex. 3:14), so is possibly accurate, though ancient Hebrew — in its written form — had no vowels. So the only name we can be sure of is YHWH (transliterating the Hebreww letters for English), which is unpronounceable except for “Yod-Heh-Vah-Heh”. But since the New Testament translates that word as “Lord”, I think that’ll suffice. 🙂

  • Reply April 6, 2019

    Ray E Horton

    Who cares? I’m sure the Lord doesn’t.

  • Reply April 6, 2019

    Philip Williams

    Yehovah!

  • Reply April 6, 2019

    Link Hudson

    They say they put the letters for adonai below YHWH. The word ‘Jehovah’ does not follow the rules for pronouncing vowels anyway. They don’t match the consonants using that system. The vowels were added in the 300’s AD anyway.

    • Reply April 8, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      300 sAD? was that the first or the second YHWH ?

    • Reply April 8, 2019

      Link Hudson

      That may have been 1300s. Fuzzy memory on my part. I wouldn’t make jokes like that involving the tetragrammaton.

    • Reply April 8, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      are you referring to the the first or the second YHWH ?

  • Jehovah a man made name no “J” in Hebrew.

    • Reply April 10, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      we spoke with Tom Steelea about that already

  • Reply December 19, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    YES Francis R Lyons III

    Paul Loveble we’ve discussed this in detail before

    Jerome Herrick Weymouth Jehovah is the name GOD called Himself with in Exodus 3

    James Darlack has little to do with the Germanic Y and more with the Hebrew origin of the tetragram; IN Greek too James/Jacob is Yacob/v

    • Reply December 19, 2019

      James Darlack

      Troy Day The J in German transliterates the Yodh of the Tetragrammaton just like the Y in English translates it. English speakers pronounce the J like Jim. But a German would pronounce it Yehovah. So in essence, if the J/Y and the V/W are interchangeable. The vowels are either Masoretic replacements or educated guesses at the vocalization. YHWH=Yahweh=Jehovah=יהוה

    • Reply December 19, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      James Darlack The Masoretes, who from about the 6th to the 10th century worked to reproduce the original text of the Hebrew Bible, replaced the vowels of the name YHWH with the vowel signs of the Hebrew words Adonai or Elohim. Latin-speaking Christian scholars substituted the Y (which does not exist in Latin) with an I or a J (the latter of which exists in Latin as a variant form of I). Thus, the tetragrammaton became the artificial Latinized name Jehovah (JeHoWaH). As the use of the name spread throughout medieval Europe, the initial letter J was pronounced according to the local vernacular language rather than Latin.

    • Reply December 19, 2019

      James Darlack

      Troy Day We’re saying the same thing.

  • Reply December 19, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    James Darlack did you answer Paul Loveble his question if YHWH is GOD?

  • Reply December 19, 2019

    James Darlack

    I inferred its complexity. יהוה is God’s name. We can only approximate/speculate its pronunciation, and YHWH, Jehovah, and Yahweh are the various ways that יהוה has been written in German and English (and Latin).

  • Reply December 20, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    Ray E Horton you mean that GOD is I Am that I Am! not that you are I Am that I Am!

    • Reply December 20, 2019

      Ray E Horton

      Troy Day Guess you better hope that’s what I meant. 🙂

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