We Don’t Work FOR, But We Do Work OUT Our Salvation ~ Ray E Horton

We Don’t Work FOR, But We Do Work OUT Our Salvation
Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

FEB 27 8am

Newer believers often get confused by Phil. 2:12, where we are told to “work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.”

Notice that Paul did not tell them and us to work FOR their salvation; rather, he told them to work OUT their salvation. Salvation isn’t something we work for, but it is a gift of the grace of God that we receive through …faith.

The phrase work out was translated from the Greek verb “katergazomai,” and according to Wuests Word Studies from the Greek New Testament, it means to carry out to the goal, to carry to its ultimate conclusion. The Philippians and we are exhorted to “carry our salvation to its ultimate conclusion, namely, Christlikeness,” Andrew Wommack points out in his commentary.

Another way to put that would be to allow our New Creation spirits – the new man, which is the temple of the Holy Spirit – to influence our thoughts, words and actions, rather than be influenced by the flesh, which wants to focus on fulfilling bodily and emotional needs and desires. I want His desires, and can trust Him with mine. I am saved, and now I need to live out of that knowledge, in His power. We now walk not according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit Rom. 8:1 and 4.

Why fear and trembling? The Amplified version renders those words as self-distrust, with serious caution, tenderness of conscience, watchfulness against temptation, timidly shrinking from whatever might offend God and discredit the name of Christ. The flesh is to be mistrusted, and it is easy to follow fleshly ways unless we stay close to the Lord and maintain our relationship in the secret place, keeping our hearts and minds focused on Him and who we are in Him.

The flesh still feels like flesh and thinks I’m the same old person. So I need to be concerned to keep it in it’s place, reminding the flesh that I am a new person in Christ, and that it is no longer allowed to control me. I have no concern or anxiety because I am free in Christ, the Old Man truly is dead. Yet, I do recognize that in this life, I still live in a fleshly body, and thus I take seriously overcoming its propensity to lead.

In other words, because we are saved, we very much want to live out our destiny in the here and now and be all He has made us to be. Many Christians have a defeated walk. We desire to live victoriously in Him. So, we do our part, in His power, staying connected to the vine to bear fruit.

And Praise the Lord, Vs. 13 tells us how that is accomplished: “For God is the One working in you, both to will and to do His good pleasure.” We submit to Him working in us. How wonderful that He not only saves us, He empowers us for godly living, as “His divine power has given to us all things that pertain to life and godliness through the knowledge of Him who has called us by His own glory and virtue” (2 Pet. 1:3). For that I am truly thankful.

So, we work out our salvation in our prayer closet, abiding in Him and letting His Word abide in us, paying attention to His life within us, which keeps us in His presence, all of which accelerates the outworking of what He has placed in our spirits into the soulish realm and our daily life.

That is how we overcome in this life, and fulfill our destiny of being a useful tool of the Lord in His Kingdom, submitted and available to allowing Him to fulfill His desires in and through us to reach the world for Him.

Ray E Horton

Serving the Lord as encourager, reconciler, intercessor and prophetic teacher of God's Word, primarily in person and on Facebook, as well as writer and editor. Beyond, or as part of, the Ministry of Reconciliation that we are all called to, I am serving the Lord and His people as a minister of prayer at a local church, and encouraging the brethren locally among people I know, and worldwide on Facebook

12 Comments

  • Reply March 15, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    Joe Absher you can see here that Ray E Horton has posed another great Pelagian question to ponder upon theologically Our Australian friends down under RichardAnna Boyce still insist that we gain our rewards in heaven via our own works There is something to that extend that we should pay attention TO HOWEVER how much of this is pure pelagianism and how much legalism from works/ DONT sound evangelical at all if you ask me

  • Reply March 15, 2020

    Ray E Horton

    Not being a theologian, I looked up Pelagianism and found it is the is the Christian theological heretical position that the original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without special divine aid or assistance.” What has that to do with my post. I don’t believe that at all.

    • Reply March 15, 2020

      Varnel Watson

      Joe Absher I have to agree with Ray E Horton Pelagianism is a pure theological heretical position Thank GOD free will is not

  • Reply March 15, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    Ray E Horton as you see your name is in the title The auto-generated picture however can contain only so many symbols When they are too many the shortening you mentioned occurs You should be however able to see the auto-generated thumb before approving your pending posts and correct the title not to bug the whole post and picture Hope this helps

    • Reply March 15, 2020

      Ray E Horton

      Troy Day Yes, thanks Troy. I will also attempt to shorten titles on new posts.

    • Reply March 15, 2020

      Joe Absher

      Romans 3:4 KJV — God forbid: yea, let God be true, but every man a liar; as it is written, That thou mightest be justified in thy sayings, and mightest overcome when thou art judged.

  • Reply March 15, 2020

    RichardAnna Boyce

    BIBLICAL MOTIVATION FOR EARNING REWARDS IN THE MILLENNIUM. Dillow calls reigning with Christ the “joy of participating with the Messiah in the final destiny of man.” 7
    Jesus taught that the things done in this life affect the significance of one’s rule in the future. Disobedience or obedience to God’s commands determine whether one is called “least in the kingdom of heaven” or “great in the kingdom of heaven” (Matt. 5:19). Jesus’ parable of the minas was given to the disciples in anticipation of the kingdom. It taught that responsible stewardship will be rewarded with corresponding responsibilities to rule over cities (Luke 19:11-27). Jesus spoke of inheritance in connection with participation in His rule in the kingdom.
    Ruling with Him was a motivation and a consolation for those who had left all to follow Christ (Matt. 19:27-30). It is also a motivation to endure faithfully,
    for “If we endure, we shall also reign with Him” (2 Tim. 2:12).
    Paul seemed to separate entrance into the kingdom with possessing or inheriting the kingdom. All Christians will enter the kingdom: “and if children, then heirs–heirs of God . . .” But Paul promised a joint rule with Christ that is conditioned upon one’s experience of suffering with Christ in this present life: “. . . and joint heirs with Christ if indeed we suffer with Him, that we may also be glorified together” (Rom. 8:17; cf. Titus 3:7-8). 8
    Peter also separates mere entry into the kingdom from an abundant entry into the kingdom based on one’s appropriation of Christian virtues (2 Pet. 1:11).
    The difference between entering the kingdom and inheriting the kingdom is greatly neglected by Christians in general and ignored by some altogether.
    Many Christians, especially reformed Calvinists, view inheritance as merely getting into heaven. 9 In response to this interpretation and the theology behind it, Michael Eaton has called the reward of inheritance “the central motivating theme in the New Testament,” 10 an exuberant overstatement when all the motivations are considered. Still, when understood, this concept is a powerful motivation that too many Christians of all theologies neglect.
    The prospect of “the reward of inheritance” is used by Paul to motivate Christians to serve their masters/employers and to work heartily (Col. 3:22-24).
    God’s purpose for those in His kingdom is also used as an appeal by Paul to the Thessalonians to “walk worthy of God” (1 Thes. 2:12; cf. also 2 Thes. 1:5). Inheritance is used to inspire godly conduct in a number of other passages as well (cf. 1 Cor. 6:9-11; Gal. 5:21; Eph. 5:5; Titus 3:7-8).
    Hebrews is a study in motivation in itself. In seeking to keep the Hebrew-Christian readers faithful to Christ, the author uses negative motivation (the warning passages, which will be discussed later) and positive motivation.
    Much of his positive motivation is built around the concept of eternal significance in the coming kingdom of Christ. Finally, in Revelation 2:26-27 Jesus promises to those who are victorious and faithful in the Christian life “power over the nations” when He receives His millennial rule from the Father.

  • Reply March 15, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    Id say its pure heresy IMO Joe Absher Ray E Horton

    • Reply March 15, 2020

      Ray E Horton

      What are you referring to has heresy?

    • Reply March 15, 2020

      Varnel Watson

      Ray E Horton to the Pelagian heresy

    • Reply March 15, 2020

      Ray E Horton

      Troy Day Oh, most definately!

    • Reply March 15, 2020

      Varnel Watson

      well our bro/sis RichardAnna Boyce has a different feel for that coming from free grace or something

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