This is the modern teaching of grace alone

Posted by Tom Steele in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

This is why the modern teaching of grace alone (or grace without God’s Law) simply does not work. God gave certain instructions that are necessary for us to follow if we want to live the way we are created to live. The idea that God voided those instructions after He sent His Son to be a sacrifice for our sins simply does not add up.

30 Comments

  • Reply August 17, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    The modern teaching of Grace alone is grace for none
    The Biblical Reformation of Sola Gratia is of God
    For this reason I have disagreed with Tom Steele before
    and have exposed the modern day judeizers who
    spy on our grace for salvation by faith alone

  • Reply August 17, 2018

    Tom Steele

  • Reply August 17, 2018

    Tom Steele

    Teaching a message of grace is Judaizing and makes you a Judaizer Troy Day

    https://hoshanarabbah.org/blog/2016/02/26/concept-of-grace/

  • Reply August 17, 2018

    Louise Cummings

    Read Colossians. Paul is writing a letter to them telling them it’s by Grace through Faith. And the last half of chapter three in Colossians. He really tell them all the sin they have to leave alone. It straight and pure , if you are going to be a Christian. It’s no dabbling around with sin.The Church was doing pretty good until this gals teacher came in and started teaching false doctrine. Chapter three of Colossians, should let him know. And 2nd Corinthians , I cant remember chapter and verse. But it says come out from among the world, and be he separate. Touch not the unclean things and I will receive you.

  • Reply August 18, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    Teaching a message of grace is Judaizing is exactly what the Judaizers told Paul and the Galatians

    • Reply August 18, 2018

      Louise Cummings

      A lot of people doesn’t believe any part of the Old Testament. But if you will notice in Reading the New Testament, you will find it written there. God hasn’t changed his mind , on sin. Some say the Commands wasn’t brought into the New Testament. But when they ask Jesus what the greatest Commandment was. He said to Love The Lord God with all you Soul Mind and body ( to me that means with everything that’s with within you). Then He said the second is like unto it , Love thy neighbor as thy self. And on these two Commands. Hangs All The Law and the Prophets. He said Heaven and earth will pass away. But My Word will never pass away. I know I should have taken time to look all these Scriptures. But on Saturdays. I always have to hurry. Because I spend Friday and Saturday, preparing for my Sunday School Class. I put a lot of study into. I apologize for not having them looked up.

    • Reply August 19, 2018

      Varnel Watson

      A lot of people doesn’t believe a lot

  • Reply June 25, 2019

    John Ybanez Bautista

    Dont attach the work into salvation because that is dishonoring God’s way of salvation.God offer salvation in free without your help,thats grace but after you receieved that gift its actually an obligations that you need to work hard to follow Christ inorder to give back honor and glory to God,and to show the evidences of your salvation because to say that i am saved is very easy but the action or proof is very hard to prove it.Thats why true believers can show up work not to be save but to prove themselves that they were saved.

    • Reply June 25, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      is it GRACE alone? David Willier

    • Reply June 25, 2019

      David Willier

      Troy Day: Is what grace alone? What is ‘it’?

    • Reply June 26, 2019

      Brian Roden

      As pointed out by deSilva in his work on charis and pistis in the historical/cultural context in which Paul was writing.

  • Reply June 25, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Colossians 1:5-6 The living faith demonstrated by the Colossians grew successfully from their understanding of the hope laid up…in heaven. Since the term gospel simply means “good news,” the Colossians no doubt had earlier been taught more than just how Christ gives eternal life: they had also heard of the “good news” concerning the future. Eschatology, the study of end times, is vital not just to increase one’s biblical knowledge but also to give a believer impetus to live fruitfully the Christian life. Once they learned the good news of how they would live forever with Christ (Heb 7:25) in a new home built by Him (John 14:2) and would serve him forever (1 Peter 4:11), they began to live this truth out in their day-to-day existence. The result was that this truth bore fruit and increased, even in mere humans such as the Colossians. God’s Word always accomplishes its intended results: it either causes believers to live righteously (2 Tim 3:16-17), or it convicts them for living foolishly (James 4:17).

  • Reply June 25, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Colossians 1:10 How could the Colossians be fully pleasing to God? By bearing fruit in every good work. Just as believers stand out by being faithful in their behavior, so also faithful believers stand out even more by bearing fruit. Fruit does not come automatically but rather is cultivated as believers like branches remain dependant on Christ, our Vine (John 15:1-7). While He gives eternal life simply by believing the gospel, He is fully pleased only when believers take that new life and bear much fruit with it (v 8). This fruit-bearing behavior shows the world they not only believe the gospel but also are followers of Jesus as His modern-day disciples (13:35).

  • Reply June 25, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Colossians 1:21-23
    Paul’s goal for the Colossians is the same as Christ’s goal for all believers: to present them holy, and blameless, and irreproachable. While all believers are considered holy (hagios) in their positional standing the moment they believe in Christ (Heb 3:1; Rev 20:6), only through faithfulness in their day-to-day lives are believers holy in their conditional standing or experience (Rom 12:1; Eph 5:27; 1 Peter 1:15-16; 2 Peter 3:11). The fact that believers have to be told to be holy and blameless and irreproachable testifies that it is not automatic, but must be sought after.

    The phrase in His sight refers to one’s standing before the Judgment Seat of Christ, the place all believers will stand to be recompensed for how they lived the Christian life (Rom 14:12; 2 Cor 5:10). This will not decide whether believers get into the kingdom, since that is decided the moment a person places his faith in Jesus Christ for eternal life (John 3:16-18; 5:24). Only believers will be present at this event, and the purpose is for each believer to be rewarded for their level of faithfulness to God. Some will be rewarded richly (Luke 6:35; 1 Cor 3:14; Col 3:24; Heb 10:35) while others may suffer loss and regret (Matt 25:24-30; Luke 19:20-26). A believer’s goal should be to live and finish well so that he might hear those beloved words of Matt 25:23, “Well done, good and faithful servant.”

    1:23. Being accepted and rewarded at the B¢ma is conditional. It depends on whether the believer continues in the faith, grounded and steadfast. This points to the need not only to keep believing the right things, but also to act on them as well. Finishing the race with excellence was never guaranteed, even for the apostle Paul (1 Cor 9:27; cf. 2 Peter 3:17). Those who insist that all true believers finish well both with their doctrine and with their behavior fail to take into account the numerous scriptural warnings that such perseverance is never automatic (Luke 8:11-15; Gal 1:6; 2:4,14; 4:9; 5:1,4; Eph 4:14; 6:10-11; Col 2:4,8; 1 Thess 3:2,5,8; 1 Tim 1:19; 4:1; 6:10; 2 Tim 2:12,17,25; 4:4; Titus 1:9,13,15). Not all saints persevere, and so Paul reminds the Colossians of this fact so that they would not be moved away from the hope of the gospel. The good news of Jesus Christ was preached to every creature under heaven, that is, without discrimination.

  • Reply June 25, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Colossians 2:11-13
    Through faith in Christ they had received a spiritual circumcision, one made without hands, making a physical one inconsequential. By putting off the body of the sins of the flesh they had been forgiven once and for all through the circumcision of Christ. This should not be seen as some kind of promise to turn from sins for the promise of eternal life, since such a demand is not made by God and would be impossible for a person still dead in their trespasses. By trusting in Christ alone for the free gift of eternal life one receives forgiveness (Rom 6:23; Col 2:13). Putting off the…sins of the flesh refers not to dealingwith sins in one’s daily life but rather to what Christ has already done; He has rescued believers from the penalty of sin (2 Cor 5:21; Heb 9:26).

    2:12. By trusting in Jesus for eternal life, each believer is identified as having undergone the same burial and resurrection as that of Christ. This is the picture conveyed by water baptism, the reality that the believer has already trusted Christ and has been buried and then raised to life with Him. Therefore believers will live forever in Christ because Christ Himself lives forever. All this is not through man’s effort or good works but only through the working of God. The baptism Paul refers to here is not water baptism, since no good work (even the ones commanded by God) adds, brings, or proves salvation. Rather, Paul is referring to the baptism of the Holy Spirit, the sealing of God’s Spirit on each believer the moment he places his faith in Christ (Rom 6:3-4; 1 Cor 12:13; Gal 3:27; Eph 1:13).

    2:13. This truth is again examined in greater detail. Every person, though being dead in your trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, is instantly made alive together with Him the moment he is justified through faith. Believers will never be judged for their trespasses since God Himself has forgiven you all trespasses (cf. 1:13-14). Of course a believer’s fellowship with Christ can be broken by sin and so one’s sins need to be confessed in order to restore fellowship with Christ (1 John 1:8-9). A believer’s sins hinder only his abiding in Christ in fellowship with Him here on earth (John 15:5; 1 John 1:6; 3:6). They do not keep him from entering heaven, no matter how severe they may be (Rom 5:1).

  • Reply June 25, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Colossians 3:3-4 Believers should focus on the things above because they have died with Christ and their life is hidden with Christ in God. This hidden life is not a reference to sins having been nailed to the Cross (2:14), but, as 3:4 shows, to the eternal future in the kingdom of God, which is not yet visible (cf. 2 Cor 4:17-18; 5:7). When Christ…appears, we will appear with Him in glory. The revelation of who we will be forever awaits the Judgment Seat of Christ. How much we will share in His glorious reign will depend on our mindset in this life (cf. 1:21-23; 3:24; Matt 6:19-21; 1 Peter 4:13).

  • Reply June 25, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Colossians 3:9-10
    They need to be reminded of the fact they had put off the old man with his deeds. This pointed to their former standing apart from Christ and that they were now no longer seen that way before God.

    3:10. Instead, they had put on the new man or had received a new nature, that of Jesus Christ. Though believers have received a new identity, a new nature (2 Cor 5:17), yet they still war with their old nature, the old man or flesh (Gal 5:13,17; 2 Peter 2:10).

  • Reply June 25, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Colossians 3:12-13 Because of these truths Paul encourages the elect of God, saints, to put on the characteristics of one holy and beloved. Believers are always holy in their position, but earlier (in 1:22) Paul had urged them to be holy in their conduct. But in 3:12, when he calls them holy, he is referring to their position.

  • Reply June 25, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Colossians 3:15 The peace of God is distinct from peace with God (Rom 5:1). Believers are eternally secure. However, a believer may still choose to rebel against His commands the same way a child stubbornly refuses to obey the parent who unconditionally loves him. In rebellion, the child receives loving discipline administered by the parent, but in obedience the child enjoys the fellowship extended by the parent. It is this fellowship that Paul reminds the Colossians they can enjoy if they live in obedience to God’s commands. This in turn can cause them to be thankful, as Paul noted earlier in the letter (1:12).

  • Reply June 25, 2019

    Lyndsey Dunn

    Everyone loves grace! It’s Faith that many leave out. Why? Because faith requires action. Everyone loves grace! It’s sanctification that many leave out. Because justification is free but sanctification and regeneration require action. Everyone loves grace! It’s baptism in the Holy Spirit many leave out. Because living in power and authority requires action. Everyone loves grace! It’s judgment many leave out. Why? Because obedience and glorification require action. Everyone loves grace, but few follow Jesus to the cross, to the grave, and few will share in resurrection to new life. Narrow is the path!

    • Reply June 26, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      it is faith alone in Christ alone. Faith in action is only required so as not to be a stumbling block to immature believers or unbelievers. But God never requires faith in action to prove someone is born again.

    • Reply June 26, 2019

      Lyndsey Dunn

      RichardAnna Boyce What is this “it” you refer to? What specifically are you responding to from my statement? Also, are you able to give a single scriptural example of the allowance of faith not accompanied by action?

    • Reply June 26, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Lyndsey Dunn grace alone through faith alone in Christ alone. John’s Gospel 100 times mentions believe (faith), or synonyms of believing in passive form, like follow, drinking, eating, with NO mention of repenting of commitment to Jesus as personal Lord at justification. Then comes progressive sanctification ……. Galatians 3:2-3
      Paul’s rhetorical question (Did you receive the Spirit by the works of the law, or by the hearing of faith?) affirms that the Galatians were regenerate. They had received the Spirit by the hearing of faith, not by the works of the Law. Paul had preached Christ to them and they believed his message (cf. 1:9).

      3:3. The foolish Galatians had begun the Christian life by the Spirit. But now they were seeking to be made perfect by the flesh. Here is the antithesis so often proclaimed in this epistle: Spirit versus flesh. Justification and sanctification by faith came by the “Spirit,” whereas seeking justification and sanctification by legalistic observances is “flesh.”

      The flesh—works of the Law—can make no one perfect (cf. 2:16; 3:10). Perfection is obtained at the moment one believes in Christ for eternal life (cf. 2:16; 3:6-14).

    • Reply June 26, 2019

      Lyndsey Dunn

      RichardAnna Boyce Nice boxed answer on salvation. What are you responding to in my post? Still you give no example of faith not accompanied by action.

  • Reply June 26, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    I believe the OP was posted by Tom Steele to promote works of the law as part of the salvific experience Could be wrong

  • Reply June 26, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Lyndsey Dunn grace alone through faith alone in Christ alone. John’s Gospel 100 times mentions believe (faith), or synonyms of believing in passive form, like follow, drinking, eating, with NO mention of repenting of commitment to Jesus as personal Lord at justification. Then comes progressive sanctification ……. Galatians 3:2-3
    Paul’s rhetorical question (Did you receive the Spirit by the works of the law, or by the hearing of faith?) affirms that the Galatians were regenerate. They had received the Spirit by the hearing of faith, not by the works of the Law. Paul had preached Christ to them and they believed his message (cf. 1:9).
    3:3. The foolish Galatians had begun the Christian life by the Spirit. But now they were seeking to be made perfect by the flesh. Here is the antithesis so often proclaimed in this epistle: Spirit versus flesh. Justification and sanctification by faith came by the “Spirit,” whereas seeking justification and sanctification by legalistic observances is “flesh.”
    The flesh—works of the Law—can make no one perfect (cf. 2:16; 3:10). Perfection is obtained at the moment one believes in Christ for eternal life (cf. 2:16; 3:6-14).

  • Reply June 26, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Galatians 3:11
    Paul picks up his proposition directly from 2:16. People can be justified in the sight of men by their works, but not in the sight of God (cf. Rom 4:2; James 2:21,25).

    Paul then quotes Hab 2:4, “the just shall live by faith.” Actually the Greek (ho dikaios ek pisteœs z¢setai) has a different word order which yields a difference sense: “the just by faith shall live” (cf. Rom 1:17; Heb 10:38).
    Z¢setai is placed last for emphasis. Paul is not saying that the righteous person should live his life by faith. Rather, he is saying that the one who is just (declared righteous by God) by faith shall live. This shows the close connection between justification (the just by faith) and regeneration (shall live). Justification and regeneration are by faith in Christ, not by works of the Law.

  • Reply June 26, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Galatians 3:18. Here Paul introduces the word inheritance for the first time in the epistle. This term is sometimes used in the NT to refer to things that all believers have: eternal life, the guarantee of entrance to the kingdom of God, justification, sonship, and so forth. This might be called passive inheritance. In other places it refers to things only faithful believers will have: rulership with Christ and the privileges that go with it. This might be called active inheritance. Paul clearly has passive inheritance in mind here in 3:18. Only once in Galatians does he refer to active inheritance by using this expression (5:19-21; though see also 6:7-9 for the concept).

    Obviously if the Law came long after God’s promise to Abraham, then the inheritance could not be of the Law. God made an unconditional promise of blessings to Abraham and his Seed.

  • Reply June 26, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    James 2:22-23 When a person is justified by faith, he or she finds an unqualified acceptance before God. As Paul puts it, such an individual is one “to whom God imputes righteousness apart from works” (Rom 4:6). But only God can see this spiritual transaction.
    However i agree that faithful works are necessary to earn rewards in the Millennium, after the Rapture; as co-heirs with Christ. But even if a new believer never matured by doing any faithful works, they would still spend eternity with God as a child of God; as once a child always a child.

  • Reply June 26, 2019

    Lyndsey Dunn

    RichardAnna Boyce In the jungles of theology, succinct direction makes clearer the path than a thousand swipes of a machete. ??? ?

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This is the modern teaching of grace alone

Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

This is why the modern teaching of grace alone (or grace without God’s Law) simply does not work. God gave certain instructions that are necessary for us to follow if we want to live the way we are created to live. The idea that God voided those instructions after He sent His Son to be a sacrifice for our sins simply does not add up.

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