The Centurion Cornelius

Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

In Acts 10 it states:

1 At Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion in what was known as the Italian Regiment. 2 He and all his family were devout and God-fearing; he gave generously to those in need and prayed to God regularly. (NIV)

My understanding is that Roman soldiers of this period (Augustus through to Septimus Severus [193-211 CE]) were prohibited from marrying [“The men serving in the army, since they could not legally have wives, were granted the privileges of married men.” Cassius Dio 60.24.3]

This raises the question who are the οἴκῳ of verse 2? Are these an illicit family, thus raising questions of “devout and God-fearing;” or are they merely servants and retainers? If the former does indicate that since such non-married living and family arrangements were unofficially sanctioned by Rome, that Cornelius’ situation was an application of Acts 17:30 being in play, that his ignorance was overlooked until his repentance?

1 Comment

  • Reply February 19, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Was Cornelius saved after Peter shared the gospel? I’d like to believe that Cornelius was saved before Peter preached to him, but the scriptures appear to refute it: Luke wrote, “He [Cornelius] told us how he had seen the angel standing in his house and saying, ‘Send to Joppa and bring Simon, who is called Peter; he will give you a message by which you and your entire household will be saved’” (Act 11:13-14 NRS). http://www.pentecostaltheology.com/cornelius-was-saved-after-peter-shared-the-gospel/

Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.

Leave a Reply to Varnel Watson Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.