Sanctification is

Sanctification is
Charles Page | PentecostalTheology.com

Sanctification is

65 Comments

  • Reply March 24, 2016

    David Lewayne Porter

    1 and 2, (can’t discount #1, but is most assuredly #2)

  • Reply March 24, 2016

    Jimmy Humphrey

    Jesus Christ is my sanctification.

  • Reply August 31, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    tell us RichardAnna Boyce Isara Mo Nelson Banuchi

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      Can it be stated in one sentence? I’d find that hard to do; I ain’t that smart.

      Okay, I’ll try. Sanctification is being in Christ set free from the penalty and power of sin through the ministration of the Holy Spirit on the basis of God’s grace.

      Here’s a little study I did on it in Rom 6-8 a long time ago…

      https://atdcross.blogspot.com/2014/02/roman-6-8-sanctification.html

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Nelson Banuchi instant? entire?

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      Both… not sure that is clear in my study since I haven’t read it in a long time. I was just going by what the Bible was making clear about sanctification, leaving out any controversial interpretations of the text.

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      But I believe sanctification is both instantaneous and progressive.

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Nelson Banuchi sounds like a licence to sin

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      Troy Day It being progressive? How?

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Nelson Banuchi progresso or espresso is not the dilemma

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      Troy Day So, what’s the dilemma?

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      instant or entire

    • Reply August 31, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      Troy Day I don’t see it as a dilemma. I guess we’d have to define exactly what we mean by both. Let me see if I can do so succinctly of the top of my head…

      Entire sanctification is the purification of the intents and desires of the heart by the Holy Spirit towards God and His will.

      Progressive sanctification is the growth we obtained daily as we walk in entire sanctification from “glory to glory,” so to speak; there is always growth in revelation and knowledge incumbent on us to obey.

      In both cases there is always the possibility of falling into sin in thought, word, or deed but sin is neither necessary nor inevitable; it would depend on our choosing to continue to walk in the grace bestowed on us through the Spirit.

      That one is entirely sanctified is no guarantee in and of itself that one will remain entirely sanctified; and one’s progression in sanctification is not automatic but dependent on freely choosing to obey in faith. Neither is both a guarantee that one will not make a mistake and go the wrong way (not necessarily sinful), misread the Spirit’s promptings or voice, or sin unconsciously.

      The promise of the Spirit is no guarantee, without our participation in Christ, of continuance in faith and obedience or of obtaining final salvation (John 15:1-8; 2 Peter 1:2-11; 1 John 3:2-3; Jude 20-21).

  • Reply August 31, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    A Christian’s sanctification has three aspects: past (positional justification), present (progressive sanctification), and future (perfect glorification). We know that justification and glorification are by God’s grace through faith, not our effort or works. Can we say the same about our present experience of sanctification?
    Sanctification (I will use the word to mean present progressive sanctification) is by grace because the God who justified us also provides everything we need on the way to our final glorification (Rom. 8:29-32).

  • Reply August 31, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    The three persons of the Godhead all play an active role in our sanctification: The Father (John 17:17; 1 Thes. 5:23), the Son (Eph. 5:26; 1 John 1:7); and the Spirit (Rom. 15:16; 2 Cor. 3:18). God also uses various means for our sanctification such as His Word, His Spirit, the church, trials, and various other experiences. The power of His Holy Spirit that gives us new birth at justification is the same power that sanctifies us through the life of the risen Christ.
    Sanctification involves our cooperative response to God’s grace.

  • Reply August 31, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Since God supplies the power, sanctification is by grace, but it is not automatic. If it were, it would seem that all Christians would grow at the same rate and none could be held accountable for stagnation or lack of growth. But we know that all Christians do not grow at the same rate or progress to the same degree of holiness. We also know that the Judgment Seat of Christ holds Christians accountable for how they use their lives (Rom. 14:10-12; 2 Cor. 5:9-10), which indicates different degrees of progress in sanctification.

    That is why many Bible passages put the onus on the Christian to grow spiritually (eg. Rom. 12:1-2; 2 Peter 3:18). However, the Bible clearly indicates that the Christian must cooperate with God.

  • Reply August 31, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Every Christian is sanctified by grace from the moment of justification, through present sanctification, to the final state of glorification. But the progress of our present sanctification may vary depending on our faith that accesses the grace God has made available to us in Christ. Sanctification is God’s desire for us (1 Thes. 4:3; Heb. 12:14; 1 Peter 1:14-15), but it is not an automatic act of God, nor is it merely from human effort. Christians are sanctified by God’s grace accessed through faith.

  • Reply August 31, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    RichardAnna Boyce what you are saying is NOT speaking to the OP at hand – progresso or espresso is not the way it works

  • Reply August 31, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Troy Day, Sanctification is
    a second distinct work of God’s continuous grace. I am glad you approve of me responding Biblically everytime 🙂

  • Reply September 1, 2019

    AB Robertson

    When we have our desires to serve God and our actions begin to line up!

    • Reply September 1, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      so what is God’s roll in our desires and actions?

    • Reply September 2, 2019

      AB Robertson

      The Lord through the power of the Holy Spirit begins to operate a “NEW” law in our life, which has authority and power over the “old” law. This is how sanctification occurs. When we allow The Holy Spirit to work in us, then the desires of our life (post salvation) begin to turn into a new lifestyle or way of living.
      Rom. 8:1-2

  • Reply September 1, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    Nelson Banuchi seems like RichardAnna Boyce finally brought about the 2nd work of Grace BUT one cannot have it both ways – instant at salvation and progressive during life My question HOWEVER has been always more about the ENTIRE part of sanctification All of us recognize some part of sanctification but when is it ENTIRE

    • Reply September 1, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day very clear to me brother. A Christian’s sanctification has three aspects: past (positional justification), present (progressive sanctification), and future (perfect glorification).

    • Reply September 1, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce You have taken quite the liberty to create a theological nonsense with NO Bible in it

      The BIBLE says BE HOLY

      How does this entertain the positional justification as sanctification – its not even in the same ZIP code of the Pentecostal Ordo salutus

      present (progressive sanctification – BIBLE says BE holy not BE-come holy

      future (perfect glorification). – this is as far as Mars or the Heavens; glorification is promised only to Holy Saints not ppl who always chase after holiness but deny its power

    • Reply September 1, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Col 2:9,10 ‘For in Him dwells all the fullness of the Godhead bodily; and you are complete in Him.’

      When God saved us He baptised us into Christ. The one baptism that includes all others.
      In Christ we are righteous, strong, holy, kings and priests, victorious, salt of the earth, light of the world, the mind of Christ, never separated from the love of God, branches in the Vine, complete in Christ, and secure.

    • Reply September 1, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Get a greater revelation of who you are in Christ.
      1 John 3:7 ‘He who practices righteousness is righteous, just as He is righteous.’

      I John 3:9 ‘Whoever has been born of God does not sin, for His seed remains in him; and he cannot sin, because he has been born of God’.

      Another dilemma is that the Bible says Christians cannot sin! The Life of Jesus can’t sin.

      The more you know you are righteous, the more you know it suits you to be righteous.

      A Christian, knowing he is righteous in Christ, cannot sin without feeling conviction.
      That conviction is the Holy Spirit giving testimony to the believer’s true identity.

    • Reply September 1, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Rom 4:6 ‘just as David also describes the blessedness of the man to whom God imputes righteousness apart from works:’
      God permanently imputes/credits the righteousness of God in us by faith not works, cause
      Rom 4:8 ‘Blessed is the man to whom the Lord shall not impute sin.”
      The Cross settled the sin problem for believers forever, when we trust Jesus to be saved.
      Sin will never be put into our account in heaven or earth,
      Because God has already imputed/credited all our sins to Christ and judged them there.

    • Reply September 1, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Is God unjust by calling us righteous, even when we sin?
      Deut 25:1 Judges had to ‘justify the righteous and condemn the wicked.’
      Prov 17:15 ‘He who justifies the wicked and condemns the just are an abomination to God.’
      Rom 4:5 ‘God justifies the ungodly’
      How can God justify the ungodly and not be corrupt?
      Rom 4:6-8 ‘just as David also describes the blessedness of the man to whom God imputes righteousness apart from works:
      7 “Blessed are those whose lawless deeds are forgiven,
      And whose sins are covered;
      8 Blessed is the man to whom the Lord shall not impute sin.”
      By imputing/crediting our sins to Jesus and judging them there.

    • Reply September 1, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      1 Tim 3:16 ‘And without controversy great is the mystery of godliness:
      God was manifested in the flesh, Justified in the Spirit, Seen by angels,
      Preached among the Gentiles, Believed on in the world, Received up in glory.’
      Godliness is God behaving through a man.

    • Reply September 1, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      1 Cor 1:30 ‘But of Him you are in Christ Jesus, who became for us wisdom from God—and righteousness and sanctification and redemption’
      United with the Life of Jesus in His resurrection, through the indwelling Holy Spirit, is the root of our holiness, godliness and sanctification, as well as righteousness at the Cross.

    • Reply September 2, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce you STILL Dont give verses to what I asked It amazes me at times 🙂

  • Reply September 2, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    RichardAnna Boyce I quoted BE HOLY – hundreds of times in the BIBLE

    Can you give 3 verses where God says
    BE progressively sanctified?

    Can you give 3 verses where God says
    BE positionally sanctified?

    Can you give 3 verses where God says
    BE partially sanctified?

    You are about 9-10 verses short on this one so far

    • Reply September 2, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      If we were instantaneously and entirely and sanctified, there would be no need to command sanctification/holiness.

      There is a growth IN holiness, that is, with more and continued increase in knowledge and revelation comes a greater measure of sanctification that we may obtain. Doesn’t necessarily mean one is sinning or is sinful, although one can stop their growth in holiness by willful neglect or disobedience.

      Holiness is not something static; it starts with more and spiritual perfection and continues to increase in perfection.

      Of course there is no verse in Scripture that makes explicit mention of progressively growing in sanctification/holiness, but there are verses that, to me, clearly imply it.

      2 Cor 7:1 – “perfecting holiness”

      Eph 2:21 – corporately, we are “growing into a holy temple,” but that can only be true if each of us are growing individually in holiness.

      1 The 5:23 – “sanctify you entirely,” which would suggest a growth in that sanctification being received that we be “preserved complete, without blame” at Jesus’ future return.

      Especially, 2 Pet 1:3-11, although it doesn’t mention the word “holiness” or “sanctification,” how else are we to understand what the apostle means when he writes “supply” or “add” (depending on the version of your Bible) to your faith the following moral virtues listed?

      Finally, in 2 Pet 3:18, “grow in the grace and knowledge.” How else are we to understand this verse if not with application to the “divine power ha[ving] granted to us everything pertaining to life and godliness,” i.e. holiness?

      God sanctifies, cleans up a person’s heart yet he is to continue and grow in that cleansing in have an increase is his capacity for grace that leads to holiness.

    • Reply September 3, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Nelson Banuchi If we were instantaneously and entirely sanctified, there would be no need to command sanctification/holiness. #THERE but GOD yet commanded it so what do we do with his command? Dont obey it all our lives till we die as RichardAnna Boyce or try to complete with our own good works as Peleagians do Philip Williams ?

    • Reply September 3, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day you continually misrepresent me, and i’m sure you have more intelligence than that. My position, AGAIN, is that obedience to Jesus as Lord is COMPULSORY to earn rewards in the Millennium. But if believers unfortunately apostocise they will lose all rewards in the Millennium, but still be reconciled in Glorification after the Millennium.

    • Reply September 3, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      Troy Day please post the verse where command is given. Thanks!

    • Reply September 3, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      Btw, I presented Scripture to support my position, which you have not answered. How do you interpret these verses posted in my previous response to support your argument? Thanks!

    • Reply September 3, 2019

      Varnel Watson

    • Reply September 3, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      Troy Day Thanks. While I look them over, can you explain to me how the interpretation of the verses I posted in my previous comments is erred. For your convenience, I copy/past them below:

      Of course there is no verse in Scripture that makes explicit mention of progressively growing in sanctification/holiness, but there are verses that, to me, clearly imply it.

      2 Cor 7:1 – “perfecting holiness”

      Eph 2:21 – corporately, we are “growing into a holy temple,” but that can only be true if each of us are growing individually in holiness.

      1 The 5:23 – “sanctify you entirely,” which would suggest a growth in that sanctification being received that we be “preserved complete, without blame” at Jesus’ future return.

      Especially, 2 Pet 1:3-11, although it doesn’t mention the word “holiness” or “sanctification,” how else are we to understand what the apostle means when he writes “supply” or “add” (depending on the version of your Bible) to your faith the following moral virtues listed?

      Finally, in 2 Pet 3:18, “grow in the grace and knowledge.” How else are we to understand this verse if not with application to the “divine power ha[ving] granted to us everything pertaining to life and godliness,” i.e. holiness?

  • Reply September 3, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Troy Day i have given you 25 verses on sanctification, to back up my beliefs on progressive sanctification, but you have given me NONE 🙁

    • Reply September 3, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      most of the verses you’ve given dont even contain the word sanctification; nor you have provided proper interpretation

  • Reply September 3, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    Nelson Banuchi APART from not knowing where the Bible commands us to be holy, which verses did you mean? I’ve responded to most so many times that I’ve lost count. Pls list them here and I will be happy to give my response for whats it worth Thanks

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Nelson Banuchi to your 4 verses just like the ones RichardAnna Boyce likes to post – they have little to do with ENTIRE sanctification; not to mention the translation itself being imperfect

      2 Cor 7:1 – “perfecting holiness” The Greek word ἐπιτελοῦντες is used only 2 times here and Hebrews 9:6 and means performing and accomplishing This is clear from the first part of the verse which you excluded – that part calls us to be pure, holy – entirely in Christ Once we have this we can be performing and accomplishing in holiness for the rest of our lives The word used there καθαρίσωμεν translated as we should cleanse is in a very strong 1 person plural form that is better translated WE MUST – what better call for BE HOLY than that?

      Eph 2:21 – corporately, we are “growing into a holy temple,” but that can only be true if each of us are growing individually in holiness.- the first part is true; Once entirely sanctified we grow into a temple The Greek words αὔξει means increase or erect. No good builder would put unholy and not ready bricks into a building and expect that they will hold 🙂

      1 The 5:23 – “sanctify you entirely,” which would suggest a growth in that sanctification – not it does NOT ἁγιάσαι here is used only 1 time in this special form in the whole NT It is called Aorist (past tense) optative active Like the subjunctive, the OPTATIVE mood refers to HYPOTHETICAL actions. The type of hypothetical actions differ from the subjunctive only optative present presents an ongoing aspect The aorist optative which we have here and the perfect present simple (already) completed aspect. Since the mood is hypothetical, it NEVER receives an augment – meaning nothing makes it greater by adding to it; there is no increase ie there could be no progression its a done deal In addition to the present, aorist, and perfect, found in the subjunctive, the optative has the future and future perfect – Paul could have used them IF he intended future perfection but he did not

      Especially, 2 Pet 1:3-11, although it doesn’t mention the word “holiness” or “sanctification,” how else are we to understand what the apostle means when he writes “supply” or “add” (depending on the version of your Bible) to your faith the following moral virtues listed?

      As you admit this has nothing to do with holiness but faith We are all given a measure of faith as we are told in Romans 12;3 We grow in our faith to complete the measure of faith we are already given Just like when you are born with certain genetics you grow into them your whole life. But you are still born into the holiness of God – once and entirely

      Finally, in 2 Pet 3:18, “grow in the grace and knowledge.” has obviously nothing to do with holiness. We grow in many things but holiness is simply given to us by God. Did the temple grow holy or had to be holy to operate? Are we not the temple of God?

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day 2 Corinthians 7:1
      The reason for the cleansing is stated as perfecting holiness. He is describing progressive sanctification, a process that will never be completed in this life and is done in the fear of God, an OT concept with practical implications.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day Ephesians 2:21-22
      The Jews had their temple. It was still standing when Paul wrote this letter. (It was destroyed in AD 70 by the Romans and has yet to be rebuilt.) But the Church does not have a temple; it is a temple, a living dwelling place of God in the Spirit. It is not simply Jews who are part of this holy building. The words you also refer to Gentile believers. Gentiles are being built together as part of the superstructure of this building which stands on the foundation of Jesus Christ and His apostles and prophets.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day 1 Thessalonians 5:23-24
      This is a work God must do in the believer. This is emphasized by the fact that Himself is the first word in the Greek sentence. Paul is requesting that God Himself would sanctify them.

      To sanctify, which means “to set apart,” is related to the word holy. God wants believers to be totally set apart from the evil world in which they live. This complete sanctification is not sinlessness (1 John 1:8,10). Rather, it is a consecration of all aspects of one’s life to God: marriage, work, parenting, neighborliness, hobbies, driving, eating, sexuality, and so forth. No amount of effort can accomplish this sanctification apart from God’s enablement.

      Another way of saying this is that one’s whole spirit, soul, and body be preserved blameless [amemptœs] at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. Paul is thinking of the total person. One cannot be blameless in his spirit if his body is not blameless. Each person is a unit and whatever one’s body does, his spirit and soul participate in. The passive voice shows that God must do this for the believer. He cannot do this by mere force of will.

      Blameless does not mean sinless. Each believer’s aim should be to be blameless at the Judgment Seat of Christ. The same word is used in Luke 1:6 to refer to the parents of John the Baptist: “And they were both righteous before God, walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless.” That is, they were godly people. They pleased God. While still sinners, they were nonetheless obedient to God. A blameless Christian is one who is above reproach. This is like the elder who is to be blameless (1 Tim 1:6-7) in the church and community. The same word is also used in 3:13 in a context referring to the B¢ma

      5:24. God will give believers all they need to be blameless at His coming. That is what Paul means when he says, He who calls you is faithful, who also will do it. Paul is not promising success here. He is promising that God will give all that is needed so that believers might achieve what He has just commanded.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day 2 Peter 1:4 The words by which have been given to us are connected with the main idea of v 3: His divine power has given believers all things, including exceedingly great and precious promises. These valuable promises are the means by which believers can be sharers of the divine nature and can escape the lust-driven corruption of the world around them.

      While all believers have a divine seed imparted to them at the new birth (1 John 3:9), Peter is here speaking at a practical level. God has given believers what they need for godly living and thus they can experientially share in God’s nature, in His holiness, and actually escape the bondage to lust that corrupts human life in this world.

      2 Peter 1:9 The blind and shortsighted believer lacks appreciation for God’s mercy in the past. But he also shows an unconcern about new sins that will also require forgiveness from God. Naturally this does not mean that he is in danger of losing eternal life. The fact remains that sinning believers must seek their Father’s forgiveness in order to renew their fellowship with Him (1 John 1:7-9). Remembering one’s past cleansing ought to galvanize him to pursue holiness and growth (3:17-18).

      2 Peter 1:10-11 All Christians have been given a royal summons by God Himself, inviting them to the glorious privilege of co-reigning with Christ in the life to come (2 Tim 2:12; Rev 2:26-27; 3:21). But not all Christians will be chosen to co-reign (cf. Rom 8:17 b; 2 Tim 2:12).

      Peter, therefore, wishes his readership to produce in their lifestyle appropriate verification that they are royal people, destined for high honor in the coming kingdom of God.

      1:11. All born-again Christians will enter the kingdom of Christ, but only those who develop the Christian character described in this chapter will have a special kind of entrance. For so, says Peter, an entrance will be supplied to you abundantly.

      The words will be supplied are from the passive form of the same verb, epichoregeœ, in v 5. Only if believers add to their faith the character qualities Peter describes will God add to him a rich entrance to the kingdom.

      Heavenly reward, not salvation from hell, is the theme here. The holy and fruitful lifestyle of vv 3-8 can be a demonstration that an individual Christian has not only been called, but actually chosen, for great reward in God’s future kingdom. As he diligently pursues this pathway, doing the things Peter has enjoined, he will be able to avoid any serious spiritual stumble (v 10). Thus his pathway can climax in a rich entrance into Jesus’ everlasting kingdom.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day 2 Peter 3:18
      Knowledge is not for Peter the only, or even the primary, key to spiritual growth. Instead grace has primacy in this process and true spiritual knowledge flows from an understanding of grace. Experience teaches the wise spiritual shepherd that an appreciation of the grace of God as manifested in Jesus Christ is the catalyst for spiritual progress.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce 2 Cor 7:1 he is NOT describing progressive sanctification as the Greek clearly states that If he wanted to describe progressive he could have used the example I gave but he didnt – it was a done deal in Pauls blessing

      Eph 2 the TEMPLE was sanctified entirely There was no progresso there at all It had to be ALL sanctified before used for the service of worship

      1 Thessalonians 5
      This is a work God HAS already done in the believe Are you now claiming God is not done with his salvific plan and must repeat it over and over just for your theory to work?

      2 Pet 3:18 and 1:4 are BOTH irrelevant to the OP Melvin Harter Hold on to your britches Philip Williams you see what Im dealing with there

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      Troy Day Thanks for those verses clarifying your interpretation. There is no disagreement on my part.

      Just to clarify, I am not saying the Bible does not teach “entire sanctification”; as I stated before that I believe the Bible teaches entire sanctification. However, I do think (and I will go over those verses more in-depth with your interpretations in mind) that they also support a progressive aspect of sanctification.

      Nor am I implying that one is not entirely sanctified if progressing in sanctification or sinful while progressing in sanctification. To progress in sanctification does not assume being “in and out” of sin but of overcoming sin in every aspect and situation and overcoming sin as greater light and insight is developed.

      But neither do I think either the idea of entire or progressive sanctification excludes the possibility of sins of ignorance that the Spirit in tie convicts and seeks repentance, for one obtains a clear conscience before God not only by continual obedience but by keeping repentance up-to-date.

      Also, entire and progressive sanctification does not mean one will perfectly obey – and to not perfectly obey does not necessarily mean they are sinning – but only that we are being as obedient as we can be, performing the good with a clear conscience and with the strength one is able to perform it.

      For example, some are able to pray for 3 hours at a time, others for only 5 minutes at a time. Is the latter sinning or not entirely sanctified by not taking greater time to pray? Is one sinning or not entirely sanctified because his prayer may be (as seen by others) shallow? I don’t think so. But the one praying 5 minutes may be as entirely sanctified as the one who is praying for 3 hours. However, both their progress in time in prayer, that is, may result in taking more time and having more depth while entirely sanctified, which is progression IN their state of being entirely sanctified.

      Progression in entire sanctification as adding to it; like adding more purified water into a large bottle of purified water where space allows. Our purification continues in even greater purification (1 John 3:3).

      Holiness is measured not by what we do but by what we are in Christ, that is, the chosen as such to be saved and serve. There is always room to grow; even Jesus grew in grace and wisdom, which entails a progression in sanctification whole he was yet entirely – and absolutely! – sanctified, he being God.

      One last thing, there are many verses that, I think, show the teaching of sanctification is both entire and progressive, which may not necessarily include the word “sanctification,” “sanctify,” “holy,” or “holiness” like 1 John 3:3 and 2 Peter 1:5-9 and 3:18.

      Perhaps, such progression IN entire sanctification will cease when “we shall see Him as He is,” although, I believe, there will still be some sort of continuance in growth and increase for us.

      One thing I do find disturbing is that there are those who believe in entire sanctification yet limit sin to acts of disobedience with 1 John 3:4 as their, apparently, sole support. Yet, while sin is the act of disobedience, it is not merely an act of disobedience. Sin is so much more than the act for it involves the thoughts, attitudes, and aims of the heart. Even while the act may be good, the attitude, thoughts, and aims may be sinful.

      In any case, I think we are essentially in agreement regarding entire sanctification, however, I may not be able to explain myself clearly since it seems there is something you are not understanding. Anyway, I do hope this clears things up for you regarding my thoughts on the issue.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Nelson Banuchi I understand your clarification entirely

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      Nelson Banuchi

      Then you understand that I believe in entire sanctification as you do but with the caveat that one can increase in holiness. If you still don’t think I believe in entire sanctification as you, perhaps you can define it as you understand it for me.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Nelson Banuchi and Troy Day, i agree with both of you to the extent that the moment we are born again we receive positional entire sanctification in our spirit; we sin by hypocritical choice in the flesh. There is a battle between our spirit and flesh; and we hopefully progressively experience positional ‘entire’ sanctification; but by grace it is not mandatory; and an unfortunate apostate believer will make it through the fire into eternal heaven, but with loss of rewards in the Millennium.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Wesley’s Entire sanctification involves freedom from willful sin, but it is not the final destination of Christian growth.
      Dieter says, “the idea of a gradual progression in sanctification is extended beyond the boundaries of this life,
      even though the basic relationship that nourishes such development is established
      in the crisis moment of entire sanctification.”

      Dieter also believes that the Reformation tradition, with its emphasis on imputed righteousness,
      neglects Paul’s teaching that existential deliverance from sin is available in Christ.
      Since the life of Jesus is being revealed in them, Christians should “not let sin reign in their mortal bodies.”
      They have been “set free from sin and have become slaves to God.”
      For Wesley and his followers, then, any view of sanctification that doesn’t hold out the possibility of real, experiential deliverance from sin in this life falls short of the full Gospel.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      In The John Wesley Reader, a compilation of Wesley’s sermon notes and journal entries, Wesley translates Rom. 6:6 as “Our old man is crucified with Christ, that the body of sin might be destroyed (katargeo), that henceforth we should not serve sin.” Translating katargeo as “destroyed” is consistent with Wesley’s belief in the removal of the sin nature. This is confirmed when he adds, “an immediate fruit of this faith… is power over sin… for it purifies the heart from every unholy desire and temper.”[18]

      Wesley minimized the role of the sin nature in the life of the believer and the conflict it causes within. This conclusion is also supported by the Wesleyan doctrine of entire sanctification.

      Entire sanctification is an important doctrine in Wesleyan theology. It offers the hope that Christians are able to live without sin during their lives on Earth.[19] But this claim doesn’t account for numerous New Testament texts which describe a struggle between the flesh and the spirit. In Galatians 5:17, Paul describes struggling against the sinful tendencies of our flesh as if it were a normative part of the Christian experience. In Romans 7:18 Paul says, “the wishing (of doing good) is present in me, but the doing of the good is not.” How does the doctrine of entire sanctification explain how statements like these can come from a mature Christian?

      Dieter cites Matt 5:48 as proof that it is possible to live free of willful sin.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      At the turn of the 20th century, when their movement started, Pentecostals disagreed over the way sanctification occurs in the life of a believer.
      Holiness Pentecostals asserted that before one can receive the baptism of the Holy Spirit,[37]
      they must first undergo the crisis experience of entire sanctification. This type of sanctification was seen as a definitive work of God’s grace that a believer receives much in the same way he receives salvation.

      Other Pentecostals (like those who later formed the Assemblies of God) argued
      that putting one’s faith in Christ’s forgiveness is the only precondition for receiving the baptism of the Holy Spirit. They downplayed the importance of a second (or third) work of grace in which Christians are entirely sanctified,
      and instead viewed sanctification as process.

      Further refinement of the Pentecostal understanding of sanctification grew out of disagreements over the nature of the trinity.
      In 1916, trinitarian disputes compelled the Assemblies of God to clearly delineate their beliefs in the form of a 16-point statement of faith.
      This document touched on sanctification, but leaders soon recognized that the definition provided was vague and poorly formulated. Over time, however, the definition of sanctification was fleshed out. Instead of entire sanctification, they favored instantaneous sanctification (see 1 Cor. 6:11-12)
      and progressive sanctification (2 Cor. 3:15), that is, that Christians are positionally sanctified at conversion
      but then progressively sanctified over the course of their lives.
      The distinction between instantaneous and progressive sanctification, promoted by the Assemblies of God,
      moved away from the belief in entire sanctification espoused by the Holiness wing of the Pentecostal movement.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      The bulk of Horton’s essay explains the view of sanctification being taught today in the Assemblies of God
      and focuses on the meaning of instantaneous, progressive, and entire sanctification.

      Instantaneous/ positional sanctification
      Instantaneous or positional sanctification is similar to the Reformed notion of definitive sanctification.
      This type of sanctification:

      – occurs at the moment of belief
      – involves the believer being set apart from the world to follow Christ
      – is symbolized by baptism (Col. 2:11-12)
      – occurs because we are united with Christ and given new life (1 Cor. 1:30)
      – puts us in perfect relationship with God
      – sets Christians free to do God’s will
      – is based on the finished work of Christ

      Progressive sanctification
      Horton cites a number of verses to show that Christians don’t always measure up to their positional sanctification. Corinthians, despite being called sanctified in 1 Cor. 6:11, were still addressed as “infants” in 1 Cor. 3:1.
      Other passages indicate that self-control needs to be learned (1 Thes. 4:3-4),
      and that old habits, like lying, must be renounced (Col. 3:5-10).

      While Wesleyans claim they have been released from willful sin through entire sanctification,
      Horton believes these claims result in “making God out to be a liar.”[38]
      He also holds that the blood of Christ cleanses us from our sin in an ongoing way.
      This is in contrast to the notion that there is no need for Christians to repeatedly seek to be cleansed from their sins.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Entire sanctification
      Pentecostals in the Assemblies of God reject Holiness claims to be able to reach a state of sinless perfection in this life.
      They contend that the old nature is still active in a Christian and that claims of perfection depend on a weakened definition of sin.
      Despite these objections, however, they still use the term “entire sanctification.”
      Instead of abandoning the term, they redefine it as:

      (1) following the purposes and desires of God to the best of one’s ability or
      (2) an event that occurs when Christ comes back and gives us glorified bodies.

      Thus, the term entire sanctification is being used here in a way that is entirely different than Wesley’s usage.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Summary
      Holiness and A o G Pentecostals agree that justification and positional sanctification occur at the same time.
      They also agree that both man and God play a role in Christian growth.
      They differ as to the definition of entire sanctification and whether it is possible to live a life free from sin.
      The Assemblies of God maintain that sin is not entirely removed in the life of a believer
      and that sanctification is a long process of growth and change.
      Holiness Pentecostals tend to view sanctification as a defining, post-conversion event in the life of a Christian.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      FREE GRACE VIEW:- ……………………………………… Perfection
      – Christians will never reach a sinless state on this side of the grave (Phil. 3:12-16; James 3:2; 1 John 1:8-10).
      I reject the Wesleyan notion of freedom from known sin and the Keswick teaching on freedom from deliberate sin. Claims to perfection are fertile ground for self-deception and rationalization.

      Process/ Crisis
      Bible teaches that sanctification is an ongoing process (Gal. 3:3; Eph. 4:15-16; 1 Thes. 4:1,10; 2 Peter 1:3-8).
      During this process, the new man is transformed into Christ’s image (2 Cor. 3:18; Eph. 4:23; Col. 3:10)
      and increased victory is won over sin (Eph. 4:22-24; Gal. 5:16-6:5; 1 Thes. 4:3-7).
      – Crises that promote growth can and do occur in the life of a Christian (2 Cor. 1:8-11; 2 Cor. 12:1-10).
      The New Testament teaches nowhere, however, that crises such as surrender (Keswick), entire sanctification (Wesley), or the Baptism of the Holy Spirit are normative experiences that should be sought by all Christians. Christians are never urged to seek life-defining post-conversion crisis experiences.
      Instead we hear more about not losing heart, not growing weary (Gal. 6:9-10)
      and pressing on with the acknowledgment we have not become perfect (Phil. 3:12-16; Gal. 5:16-6:10).

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Maturity
      – Bible makes distinctions between the maturity level of different Christians (Heb. 5:11-14; Gal. 5:13-15; 1 Cor. 2:6). But this distinction is based on knowledge of the Word of God,
      not on whether or not someone has had an experience such as entire sanctification.

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce How can you be a non Wesleyan non holiness and still claim to be Pentecostal? Are you a Calvinist now? – pls note that you claim BIBLE verses but when given the true interpretation you turn away from the BIBLE into man made doctrines

    • Reply September 4, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day i have repeated many times i am not a calvinist or arminian, but a Free Grace Pentecostal Biblicist. I am independent and study AOG Gordon D Fee & Douglas Stuart “HOW To READ THE BIBLE FOR ALL ITS WORTH”

    • Reply September 5, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      RichardAnna Boyce then you’ve lost me in your argument You have started from quoting irrelevant scriptures on the OP to now defending human made doctrinal systems

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