Lucy F. Farrow: The Forgotten Apostle of the Azusa Street

Posted by Troy Day in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

Lucy F. Farrow: The Forgotten Apostle of the Azusa Street #REVIVAL

Lucy F. Farrow: The Forgotten Apostle of the Azusa Street #REVIVAL

Lucy F. Farrow: The Forgotten Apostle of the Azusa Street Revival
Lucy F. Farrow was Baptized in the Spirit on September 6, 1905 after Parham opened up a month-long meeting in Columbus, Kansas. Lucy F. Farrow was baptized in the Spirit during this month of meetings. In the meantime, Parham was…

Lucy F. Farrow: The Forgotten Apostle of the Azusa Street #REVIVAL

8 Comments

  • Reply November 15, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    Walter Polasik If it was not for women pastors like Lucy F. Farrow: there might not been Pentecostalism at all http://www.pentecostaltheology.com/massive-youth-revival-in-the-schools-of-delbarton-west-virginia/

  • Reply November 16, 2016

    Walter Polasik

    It’s pretty sad that you put it that way. You don’t know your Bible. If it wasn’t for the Holy Spirit and true Biblical doctrine, there might not be Pentecostalism. Troy, I have found, over the years, that helpful definition of Liberals is: “People who love making the exception to the rule, the rule.” What is also amazing to me is how much, across denominational divides, people are so alike in nature. To wit: when the Holy Spirit begins something and people see the hand of God in it, a Divine act, they are thankful for a while, give glory to God for a little bit….and then set about building their own traditions, their edifices, on top of it. After they have done so, they identify a particular God-birthed movement by their own little trappings and edifices that they have built. So it has been, increasingly over the years, that, instead of God’s supernatural work and His holiness and purity (regarding doctrine and practice in the church) the Pentecostal movement has increasingly been characterized by three things: 1.) Ecumenism (making peace at the expense of truth, otherwise known as “kumbayah”) 2. Pandering to the world by turning Praise and Worship music into a straight rock fest. There has also been a “youth-izing” of everything and today’s Pentecostal teen and 20-something is only as Pentecostal and Christian as it fits his personal convenience. The latest look and the latest Christian rock band are de reguer. Everything must be “the latest”, and ‘cool”. No one wants to be thought of as “peculiar” any more. 3.) While #’s 1 and 2 predominate in modern Pentecostalism, # 3 isn’t far behind. Pastorettes are all the rage and it was Pentecostalism who put women in the pulpit first before the Episcopal or Methodist or any other church did so as the fashion of feminism took hold.
    Pastorettes may be a “distinctive” of Pentecostal history and even theology, but it is no biblical distinctive and just as stubborn a denominational hold-over as pedo-baptism is for Presbyterians and Reformed. That’s not biblical either, but wild horses won’t tear it out of the people’s “denominational’ fidelity. Stubbornly, with nary a verse to show for it, they hang on. That kind of Christianity and Pentecostalism…I could do without.

  • Reply November 16, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    Like Robert Borders explained earlier comments like the one made by Walter Polasik “relate to whether or not denominations and traditional contemporary models of hierarchical church structure and government are biblical” and not to the Biblical role of women in ministry. I pray that this group and our movement have more wisdom in honoring and recognizing women pastors like Lucy F. Farrow and so many others with a historic role within Pentecostalism

  • Reply November 19, 2016

    Walter Polasik

    Troy Day: Again, notice how you phrase things “pastors like Lucy F. Farrow with a HISTORIC role within Pentecostalism”. Problem: that something is historic doesn’t make it right. Prostitution is historically the oldest trade in the world—yet its’ historicity doesn’t make it RIGHT. Roman Catholicism certainly has a long history and claims for itself the title of “historic church”. Again, this does not make it RIGHT. Cessationism also claims a long history and, if you include the general anti-supernatural attitude, this goes all the way back to the Sadduccees. It’s quite historic, but certainly not RIGHT. So, Troy, unless you’re able to demonstrate how women in the pastorate is a BIBLICAL concept, I suggest you drop what is “popular” and stick with what is clearly delineated in the Bible. 😉

  • Reply November 19, 2016

    Walter Polasik

    P.S.—-I’m somewhat qualified to speak on things historical, I think: I teach it for a living 5 days a week.

  • Reply November 19, 2016

    Varnel Watson

    Glad you are finally noticing it and BTW most here are also qualified and even over qualified so that doesnt make it right either. But since you teach history of Pentecostalism and Lucy F. Farrow please do share your insights with the group. It will benefit a few

  • Reply May 23, 2018

    Varnel Watson

    William DeArteaga Lucy F. Farrow was Baptized in the Spirit on September 6, 1905 after Parham opened up a month-long meeting in Columbus, Kansas. Lucy F. Farrow was baptized in the Spirit during this month of meetings. In the meantime, Parham was watching events unfold in Zion, Illinois, where John Alexander Dowie was faltering.

    I think Parham sent her and a man when Seymour sent notice that he needed help. Who was Julia?

    It was not a Nazarene church, but an independent Holiness church. The NAzarenes have proved this. We learned this later

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