Is Genesis 1:1 grammatically correct in English?

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Genesis 1:1 States: ‘in the beginning God created’ or should it read ‘God in the beginning created’?

22 Comments

  • Reply January 1, 2017

    David Lewayne Porter

    Depends on if the main subject is God, or when the “created” action happened,

    • Reply January 1, 2017

      David Lewayne Porter

      If we say that Genesis 1:1 is not grammatically correct we would have to examine John 1:1 and ask what the writer’s intent is.
      Subject in view of time, or the lack of time.

  • Reply January 1, 2017

    Nelson Banuchi

    What difference does it make?

  • Reply January 1, 2017

    Jen Welcher

    I agree with Nelson Banuchi. It really doesn’t matter, In the beginning God created, Seems that’s how he spoke it.

  • Reply January 1, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    The connection of the present verse with those which follow has been much debated. The proposal of Aben Ezra, adopted by Calvin, to read, “In the beginning when God created the heavens and the earth, the earth was” is grammatically inadmissible. Equally objectionable on the ground of grammar is the suggestion of Bunsen and Ewald, to connect the first verse with the third, and make the second parenthetical; while it is opposed to that simplicity of construction which pervades the chapter.

    • Reply January 1, 2017

      Street Preacherz

      dang!!!

    • Reply January 1, 2017

      Nelson Banuchi

      Troy Day, What are the theological ramifications between the two translations in the OP?

    • Reply January 1, 2017

      Varnel Watson

      The Torah starting with the word GOD or with the phrase in the beginning

    • Reply January 1, 2017

      Nelson Banuchi

      Troy Day Oh, so there is no real theological point to one or the other, just a grammar issue.

      Why is that important?

  • Reply January 1, 2017

    David Lewayne Porter

    Troy Day
    Then how do we look at John 1:1
    In the beginning was the Word…..

    Verses let’s say
    THE Word was in the beginning.

  • Reply January 1, 2017

    Paul Hughes

    Doesn’t matter, let’s all learn Hebrew!

  • Reply January 1, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    David Lewayne Porter Greek vs Hebrew – whole different ball game

  • Reply January 1, 2017

    David Lewayne Porter

    Troy Day
    As in how?

  • Reply January 2, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Completely different morphological structuring of the sentence. past-aorist tense for the verb and verb position in the sentence and so on and so on. Based on that, some interpretations even consider the phrase “in the beginning” as an opening line or a title NOT directly connected to the sentence it self i.e.
    IN THE BEGINNING
    God created…

    As per the Greek equivalence both Gen 1:1 in LXX and John 1:1 begin with Ἐν ἀρχῇ – And per Ricky Grimsley theology of Christ Sonship the word for was is equally translated as became. Same counts for the Heb. verb in the much discussed as related to the Gap Theory Gen. 1:2 Some have stated to be part of the same sentence structure (since verse division was introduced much later) and contribution to John mimicking Gen. 1:1-2 with by using the past aorist form of the verb “to be” as became. Dual meaning is understood when reading both Greek and Hebrew texts. http://www.chabad.org/library/bible_cdo/aid/8165/jewish/Chapter-1.htm#showrashi=true

  • Reply January 2, 2017

    Grover Katzmarek Sr

    For all translation s I have read for me I believe Fenton’s is most accurate.

    He places the days as ages which makes more sense to me and answers many questions I’ve had for four decades

  • Reply January 2, 2017

    Grover Katzmarek Sr

    In Ephesians chapter six KJV says fiery darts, NIV says flaming arrows but Fenton says blazing artillery. Ive just starting reading this translation more to follow

    • Reply January 2, 2017

      Varnel Watson

      Street Preacherz I knew this preacher in NC (not David Lewayne Porter ) who would always quote it as “diary farts”

    • Reply January 2, 2017

      Street Preacherz

      B.D. or A.D.? Before Dentures or After?

  • Reply January 2, 2017

    Tim Renneberg

    Using the Hebrew word order, Genesis 1:1 reads, “In beginning created God the heavens and the earth.”

  • Reply January 2, 2017

    Stan Wayne

    Spell check when the subject is grammar

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