“False prophets” aren’t simply those whose teachings are odd

Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

“False prophets” aren’t simply those whose teachings are at odds with the teachings of Jesus and the apostles. They aren’t just the “heretics.” Rather, they are often found to be men who say the right thing, and outwardly have very impressive ministries. But at the end of the day, they are self-seeking opportunists looking to exploit you for their own gain. And they do this by hiding their true nature as best as they can….

John Kissinger [01/17/2016 12:54 PM]
Wouldn’t they be called “False teachers” Humphrey? and wouldn’t “False prophets” are the ones who prophesied false and after strange gods?

Jimmy Humphrey [01/17/2016 12:58 PM]
Exegetically no πŸ™‚

John Kissinger [01/17/2016 12:59 PM]
so if a prophet teaches, what does a teacher do?

Jimmy Humphrey [01/17/2016 1:00 PM]
That’s not the concern of Jesus. πŸ™‚

John Kissinger [01/17/2016 1:01 PM]
where do you see “teaching” in Matthew 7:15-20? (exegetically)

Jimmy Humphrey [01/17/2016 1:04 PM]
Jesus’s preoccupation in this passage isn’t with the method of delivery or office the person claims. It’s just their falseness

John Kissinger [01/17/2016 1:06 PM]
I’d say fruit is exactly gift/fruit of prophecy – I dont see “teaching” per se in the passage

Jimmy Humphrey [01/17/2016 1:11 PM]
If you are worried about whether Jesus is talking about prophecy vs. teaching, you are missing the point. Jesus isn’t concerning himself about ones gifting. He’s concerning himself about ones style of living.

John Kissinger [01/17/2016 1:12 PM]
I just dont see connection between prophecy and teaching in the text you quote. Wouldn’t false teacher be one who takes the text and teaches something that’s not in it? May even prophecy about it a bit

Jimmy Humphrey [01/17/2016 1:14 PM]
Jesus says false prophets often say the right things and have solid theology. They say Jesus is Lord and speak in His name.

Charles Page [01/17/2016 3:03 PM]
“Dawg, whut’s up in the Spirit?” Wouldn’t false teacher be one who takes the text and teaches something that’s not in it? he would be about any preacher you know!!!

John Ruffle [01/17/2016 5:06 PM]
Okay, one problem is that no-one is permitted to actually SEE the fruit of the leaders behind today’s ‘mega-ministries’. We can see a whole host of action — but that’s not the same as fruit. Fruit starts from within, so we are looking at the outworkings of the fruit of the Holy Spirit in a leader’s life. Fruit is not ever the same as gifts. It’s been said too many times, but gifts are given, whereas fruit grows. When you have minsters who can;t talk to the people because it might distract them from the ‘anointing’ then we have a problem. Take someone like Ken Copland, as the first example that comes to mind. I remember being at a fairly early crusade of his in downtown St. Louis, and guess who was running the bookstall? Gloria. Another time, a friend of mine, Chuck Shcmitt, was at one of his meetings and Chuck jumps up in the middle of the meeting and starts prophesying against the prosperity gospel. Thre ushers immediately jumped to chuck him out, but Ken stopped them and said, ‘No, he’s a man of God, let him speak.’ (I’m just speaking out what I know, that’s all.)

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“False prophets” aren’t simply those whose teachings are odd

Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

“False prophets” aren’t simply those whose teachings are at odds with the teachings of Jesus and the apostles. They aren’t just the “heretics.” Rather, they are often found to be men who say the right thing, and outwardly have very impressive ministries. But at the end of the day, they are self-seeking opportunists looking to exploit you for their own gain. And they do this by hiding their true nature as best as they can….

John Kissinger [01/17/2016 12:54 PM]
Wouldn’t they be called “False teachers” Humphrey? and wouldn’t “False prophets” are the ones who prophesied false and after strange gods?

Jimmy Humphrey [01/17/2016 12:58 PM]
Exegetically no πŸ™‚

John Kissinger [01/17/2016 12:59 PM]
so if a prophet teaches, what does a teacher do?

Jimmy Humphrey [01/17/2016 1:00 PM]
That’s not the concern of Jesus. πŸ™‚

John Kissinger [01/17/2016 1:01 PM]
where do you see “teaching” in Matthew 7:15-20? (exegetically)

Jimmy Humphrey [01/17/2016 1:04 PM]
Jesus’s preoccupation in this passage isn’t with the method of delivery or office the person claims. It’s just their falseness

John Kissinger [01/17/2016 1:06 PM]
I’d say fruit is exactly gift/fruit of prophecy – I dont see “teaching” per se in the passage

Jimmy Humphrey [01/17/2016 1:11 PM]
If you are worried about whether Jesus is talking about prophecy vs. teaching, you are missing the point. Jesus isn’t concerning himself about ones gifting. He’s concerning himself about ones style of living.

John Kissinger [01/17/2016 1:12 PM]
I just dont see connection between prophecy and teaching in the text you quote. Wouldn’t false teacher be one who takes the text and teaches something that’s not in it? May even prophecy about it a bit

Jimmy Humphrey [01/17/2016 1:14 PM]
Jesus says false prophets often say the right things and have solid theology. They say Jesus is Lord and speak in His name.

Charles Page [01/17/2016 3:03 PM]
“Dawg, whut’s up in the Spirit?” Wouldn’t false teacher be one who takes the text and teaches something that’s not in it? he would be about any preacher you know!!!

John Ruffle [01/17/2016 5:06 PM]
Okay, one problem is that no-one is permitted to actually SEE the fruit of the leaders behind today’s ‘mega-ministries’. We can see a whole host of action — but that’s not the same as fruit. Fruit starts from within, so we are looking at the outworkings of the fruit of the Holy Spirit in a leader’s life. Fruit is not ever the same as gifts. It’s been said too many times, but gifts are given, whereas fruit grows. When you have minsters who can;t talk to the people because it might distract them from the ‘anointing’ then we have a problem. Take someone like Ken Copland, as the first example that comes to mind. I remember being at a fairly early crusade of his in downtown St. Louis, and guess who was running the bookstall? Gloria. Another time, a friend of mine, Chuck Shcmitt, was at one of his meetings and Chuck jumps up in the middle of the meeting and starts prophesying against the prosperity gospel. Thre ushers immediately jumped to chuck him out, but Ken stopped them and said, ‘No, he’s a man of God, let him speak.’ (I’m just speaking out what I know, that’s all.)

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