Are pastors narcissistic?

| PentecostalTheology.com

17 Comments

  • Reply December 17, 2017

    Randy Buchanan

    Why give no name ministers who know how to write attention getting titles any publicity by posting their nonsense?

  • Reply December 17, 2017

    Cameron King

    I guess it would be abusive and narcissistic to say this guy is an idiot. So I referred this to my brother and sister-in-law who are PhD University researchers to look into the methodology of these studies.

    • Reply December 17, 2017

      Varnel Watson

      it kind of falls in the category Vision and Mission are Disorganized: The effect of an NPD leader in a congregation is that the entire congregational effort gets tainted with the toxicity of the NPD style of interacting with others. This skews the central mission and blurs the vision of a congregation. The tell-tale signs will be an inconsistent vision, mission statements that are laughable in light of the functioning of the congregation, and frequently stated plans that never reach fruition, or run off the rails soon after decided upon.

  • Reply December 17, 2017

    Scott Phillips

    “100% of statistics are questionable.” Abraham Lincoln

  • Reply December 17, 2017

    Jim Price

    having an excessive or erotic interest in oneself and one’s physical appearance. This is the definition of narcissism and in my experience does not match the attitude and personality of the preachers that I have known ( with the exception of a few ) I think the writer has got his percentages backwards. Even if we look at the synonyms I do not see them fitting the preachers that I have known. I can think of a lot of humble and meek servants of God, so his observation I dismiss.

    synonyms: vain, self-loving, self-admiring, self-absorbed, self-obsessed, conceited, self-centered, self-regarding, egotistic, egotistical,

  • Reply December 17, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Narcissistic Psychopathology and the Clergy
    J. Reid Meloy, Ph.D.
    It is the hypothesis of this author that narcissistic character disorders
    are prevalent among members of the clergy precisely because the
    profession provides strong reinforcement for such personality problems.
    Such an assertion, however valid it may be, presents an exceedingly
    difficult challenge to both the author and reader; the hypothesis
    itself will be met by resistance within the laity and emotional defensiveness
    ~mong certain clergymen. A psychological critique of those
    who have chosen the religious profession must be objective, circumspect,
    and fair if it is to be granted any credibility. Such critical dialogue
    is unusual, and, when expressed, is often ended with the thought,
    after all, that clergymen are just human like the rest of us. The hope
    that such a proposition will be considered and discussed at the level of
    personal experience and introspection by the clergy themselves may be
    quixotic at best. Those most affected by narcissistic character problems
    will have the least capacity for personal reflection outside the sanction
    of their professional identity. They are the least likely to seek individual
    psychotherapy, and have historically been the most difficult patients
    to treat; and perhaps, most importantly, will be the readers least
    likely to finish this article. https://goodguyswearblack.org/2013/11/22/signs-in-a-congregation-that-a-leader-has-covert-narcissistic-personality-disorder/

    • Reply December 18, 2017

      Johnny Martin

      in other words a “backslidden minister”, who does not believe in the true word of GOD, nor GODS power.

  • Reply December 17, 2017

    Dan Irving

    I think there is a key distinction to be made between those who enter the ministry for carnal reasons vs. those who are judged and given over to spiritual harlotry.

    • Reply December 17, 2017

      Dan Irving

      Paul said a lot of things as regards the errant or disorderly, such as: Pray For, Separate From, Mark Those, etc. etc. But he never said to “diagnose.” I don’t believe efforts to diagnose a fellow member of the body of Christ to be spiritual.

    • Reply December 18, 2017

      Jim Price

      The article in Pastoral Psychology is well worth reading and now that we have more educated people in the pew they will discern the pastors narcissistic problems and that will undercut his leadership. Therefore it is best if the pastor is strong enough and honest enough to see himself as he really is. Would that the president be able to see himself as millions of others do and somehow be cured of his narcissism.

    • Reply December 18, 2017

      Dan Irving

      It’s a spirit.

  • Reply December 18, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Full-blown narcissists (1) have this “self-referential” orientation in every area of their personality; (2) have narcissism present in their personality for their adult lifetime; (3) do not see this self-referential orientation as a problem. When all three of these conditions are true of someone, he or she is diagnosed as a narcissist. When some of these things are true, a person has narcissistic tendencies and is “functional,” that is, relates in ways that seem “normal” to unstudied observers. http://www.christianitytoday.com/pastors/2010/november-online-only/workingnarcissisticleader.html

  • Reply March 14, 2021

    M Rogers

    Thank you for confirming what victims have experienced and seen time and again. I expected that the Narcissists would object in the comments, and sure enough they did with little in the way of valid arguments. Thank you also for pointing out that modern churches ignore the Biblical pattern of the New Testament church where everyone participated in fellowship as brothers and sisters, not putting a pastor on a pedestal to be worshipped like an idol. People can go to church for weeks, months, even years without feeling known or loved. This is because most churches are following the pattern of money hungry corporations that only care about numbers, not discipleship or love, and have self-absorbed leaders, rather than church families, who don’t care to listen and thus do not discern the day of their inspection. “Many teachers, but few fathers.” Clanging bells without love. That these issues are ignored shows that the hearts of those in leadership in most churches are not humble or right with God. I don’t see any much hope for willing repentance, so God will likely let the world do what they will to them. A heavier judgment is much deserved for ignoring the cries of “the least of these.”

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