5 Error Drops in Your Christmas Sermon

5 Error Drops in Your Christmas Sermon
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5 Error Drops in Your Christmas Sermon Rick Wadholm Jr

1. Don’t add details that aren’t in the text. For example, the nature of the stable (cave, open-air, wood, etc.); whether there even was a stable; whether or not there were animals nearby; or the number of wise men. Almost certainly didn’t arrive on the night of the birth. And a star wouldn’t have been suspended right above the roofline.

2. Supply spiritual explanations for cultural practices to make them sound biblical. Like the feast wipe napkin at the feet of the buried Christ meaning I will be back. What kind of parent would you be if you didn’t give your child a Christmas present (or, in many cases, a whole roomful of them)? Or, just imagine, if you didn’t celebrate Christmas at all (like the Puritans) and go see Star Wars instead

3. Don’t be embarrassed by the Jewishness (or the Jesusness) of Christmas

4. Dubious challenges to the biblical witness to Jesus’ birth. Matthew, for example, goes out of his way to make clear that Mary was Jesus’ mother, but that Joseph was not his real father. According to Aslan, the early Christians concocted the myth of Jesus’ birth in Bethlehem in order “to get Jesus’s parents to Bethlehem so he could be born in the same city as David.” Others, such as Andrew Lincoln, deny the historicity of the Virgin Birth

5. Don’t miss the true birth of Jesus Scholars continue to debate questions such as the year of Jesus’s birth, and whether or not Jesus was born on December 25. They debate the historicity of Quirinius’s census, the year of Herod the Great’s death, the phenomena surrounding Jesus’ birth—the star of Bethlehem

5 Error Drops in Your Christmas Sermon Rick Wadholm Jr

1. Don’t add details that aren’t in the text. For example, the nature of the stable (cave, open-air, wood, etc.); whether there even was a stable; whether or not there were animals nearby; or the number of wise men. Almost certainly didn’t arrive on the night of the birth. And a star wouldn’t have been suspended right above the roofline.

2. Supply spiritual explanations for cultural practices to make them sound biblical. Like the feast wipe napkin at the feet of the buried Christ meaning I will be back. What kind of parent would you be if you didn’t give your child a Christmas present (or, in many cases, a whole roomful of them)? Or, just imagine, if you didn’t celebrate Christmas at all (like the Puritans) and go see Star Wars instead

3. Don’t be embarrassed by the Jewishness (or the Jesusness) of Christmas

4. Dubious challenges to the biblical witness to Jesus’ birth. Matthew, for example, goes out of his way to make clear that Mary was Jesus’ mother, but that Joseph was not his real father. According to Aslan, the early Christians concocted the myth of Jesus’ birth in Bethlehem in order “to get Jesus’s parents to Bethlehem so he could be born in the same city as David.” Others, such as Andrew Lincoln, deny the historicity of the Virgin Birth

5. Don’t miss the true birth of Jesus 
Scholars continue to debate questions such as the year of Jesus’s birth, and whether or not Jesus was born on December 25. They debate the historicity of Quirinius’s census, the year of Herod the Great’s death, the phenomena surrounding Jesus’ birth—the star of Bethlehem

4 Comments

  • Reply December 25, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    dont drop em erros now Joe Absher

  • Reply December 25, 2019

    Joe Absher

    You mean like saying Jacob wrestled with Jesus Christ
    I don’t think you have to worry about me adding to the Bible

    • Reply December 26, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      I dont think you dont think I have to worry… Puritans in the English Parliament eliminated Christmas as a national holiday in 1645, amid widespread anti-Christmas sentiment. Settlers in New England went even further, outlawing Christmas celebrations entirely in 1659. Anyone caught shirking their work duties or feasting was forced to pay a significant penalty of five shillings. Christmas returned to England in 1660, but in New England it remained banned until the 1680s, when the Crown managed to exert greater control over its subjects in Massachusetts. In 1686, the royal governor of the colony, Sir Edmund Andros, sponsored a Christmas Day service at the Boston Town House. Fearing a violent backlash from Puritan settlers, Andros was flanked by redcoats as he prayed and sang Christmas hymns.

  • Reply December 27, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    “I regularly read and watch Southern Baptist pastors as well as keep up with numerous Baptist blogs and I can assure you that there are dire days ahead for this convention. There is a marked departure from Scripture and that never ends well.
    Here are some of the danger signs:
    1. Preaching that nationalism is a sin.
    2. Preaching that the church is guilty of racism and needs to repent.
    3. Preaching that white people are responsible for racism in America.
    4. Ordaining women as pastors and preachers.
    5. Denying the infallibility and authority of Scripture.
    6. Openly embracing the LGBTQ agenda.

    In light of this, I am wondering where the modern day prophets are… The pulpits are strangely silent.”

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