I’m an introvert, charismatic, Pentecostal. Church needs me!

Posted by Brian Fulthorp in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

I’m an introvert. Why the charismatic [and Pentecostal] Church needs introverts

John Kissinger Always wondered WHY there are ‘many’ introverts in ministry? After all, extroverts are much more fitted for the ministry… Do you know which personality style is more effective for the pastor of a large church? http://www.churchcentral.com/videos/extroverts-and-introverts-in-ministry-which-is-more-effective/


John Kissinger
[12/14/2015 7:16 AM]
Susan Cain explores many questions related to the rise of one particular characteristic identified in the Myers-Briggs, “extroversion,” as the “cultural ideal” in American society. And, among the most interesting issues she explores, is the question, “Was Jesus an extrovert?” The idea Cain is, in fact, exploring is not the Christological question, per se, but the tendency in the American church to idealize extroversion to the point that we have, perhaps, idolized this one particular way of being in relationship. And this tendency may be undercutting the effectiveness of ministry.
She quotes one church leader as saying: “The priest must be … an extrovert who enthusiastically engages members and newcomers, a team player.” Another church leader warns church members who are charged with recruiting a new pastor to take a close look at the Myers-Briggs personality test on every potential minister. “If the first letter isn’t an ‘E’ [for extrovert]… think twice… I’m sure our Lord was [an extrovert].” http://bit.ly/1RMZ5hN

So I’ve been wondering about whether Jesus was an introvert or an extrovert. Obviously I may be projecting, but I believe he was an introvert. He was certainly a “high reactive” to religious hypocrisy and “sensitive” to religious outcasts. When tempted in his solitary sojourn in the wilderness by relevance, sensationalism, and power, he resisted. Though followed by multitudes seeking healings and teachings, he found lonely places to pray or a boat from which to preach. He called 12 disciples, and taught them privately. Perhaps it was the temperament of being introverts that Jesus shared with “the disciple whom Jesus (especially) loved” who gave us the most mystical gospel. But without extroverts like Peter and Paul, the world may not have been evangelized. http://chrisglaser.blogspot.com/2013/05/jesus-introvert-or-extrovert.html

10 Comments

  • Charles Page
    Reply September 18, 2016

    Charles Page

    God needs introverts like he needs a hole in his head

  • Troy Day
    Reply July 3, 2019

    Troy Day

    I disagree but oh well Philip Williams

  • Link Hudson
    Reply July 4, 2019

    Link Hudson

    Was Jesus emotionally ‘energized’ by being around others or by internal contemplation? Which category do we put getting awayby Himself with His Father to pray to be’energized’? Is that being around Someone or more like being alone? IMO, it does not fit Meyers Vriggs well.

    I have heard a university faculty member say she knew of no academic research to support the test. It was developed just as statistical research methodology was starting to take root and probably not subject to the same scrutiny as later tools.

    The Bible does not mention introversion or extroversion. Neither corresponds with requirements for overseership in I Timothy or Titus or instructions to risers in ai Peter. Moses and Saul might have fit the description of introverts prior tobeing chosen.

    • Troy Day
      Reply July 5, 2019

      Troy Day

      Jesus was never said to laugh in the NT Philip Williams

    • RichardAnna Boyce
      Reply July 5, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Link Hudson Jesus is like a diamond prism, showing all temperaments (or motivational gifts) at any one time. We are parts of His body, with unique temperament (or unique combinations of motivational gifts), which are God created at birth and last a lifetime. Jesus gave ministry gifts to His church; and prophets and teachers in the Bible tend to be introverts. We need an introverted pastor to disciple one on one; whereas extroverted pastors provide dynamic leadership we unfortunately demand. They take us up the mountain, one performance step at a time; and then leave us half way up as there; in legalist performance steps to burn us out. Holy Spirit gives power gifts to believers; like divine escalators to take us up the mountain at any time. IMHO. Myers Brigg only measures learnt evolutionary behaviour, but IDRLABS.COM Temperament test is a good free example of inborn created temperament.

    • Troy Day
      Reply July 5, 2019

      Troy Day

      RichardAnna Boyce there are 4 known temperaments but many unknown Charles Page

    • RichardAnna Boyce
      Reply July 5, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Creation Therapy Christian counselling has found a 5th called Supine; which is a follower or passive wanna be Sanguine (Iam Supine). But there are millions of unique combinations (using these 5) of unique temperaments; in inclusion, control and affection areas; and each divided between expressed and wanted. http://www.pastoral-counseling-center.org/Creation-Therapy-Introduction.htm

    • Charles Page
      Reply July 5, 2019

      Charles Page

      Troy Day yung/Freud slycology

    • Troy Day
      Reply July 5, 2019

      Troy Day

      Alan Smith I think Charles Page ONLY gets emotional around LIVE @ 5 and other drinking events

  • Troy Day
    Reply December 9, 2019

    Troy Day

    SOME 45% of megachurches are led by introverted pastors. Erwin McManus, Dan Kimball, and Mark Driscoll, among many others, are self-confessed introverts. Hence their results

    Joe Absher I SUBMIT to you that the BIGGEST problem of the church in America today are introverts in leading ministry #THERE Peter Vandever write an azusa reporting about that one day 🙂

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