Why is the multi-site movement growing?

Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

Speaking as one of the “nones” mentioned as a population to reach, this is not enough. These are superficial trends that will affect retention, but will not recruit, not even enough to combat attrition in most places.

One of the things I learned in the business world is when drilling into a problem, ask “why” until you get to the root of the problem… and anything less than 5 whys is staying too superficial.

Why is the multi-site movement growing when destination churches are plateauing or declining? Is the cost of gas really a deep seated reason or just an excuse when the motivation level drops to an ambivalent level. If you notice, the drop in driving is about the same percentage-wise as when we had the Oil Embargo and high oil prices under Jimmy Carter. That hardship didn’t seem to dent the growth of the Evangelical movement.

Perhaps the next “why” down is why is a relatively small challenge is causing the ambivalent to not seek out a church that “meets more of their needs”? If even a church that meets more of their needs isn’t meeting enough of the needs to draw them in, there is a deeper issue still going down.

So what do you think is the next “why” in this chain?

John Kissinger [01/26/2016 8:00 PM]
Do you think 100,000 churches is a realistic figure for 2016? Does this statistics fit your area of ministry?http://churchinfluence.com/2015-state-of-the-megachurch-report-recent-shifts-in-americas-largest-protestant-churches/

John Kissinger [01/28/2016 1:33 PM]

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Why is the multi-site movement growing?

Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

Speaking as one of the “nones” mentioned as a population to reach, this is not enough. These are superficial trends that will affect retention, but will not recruit, not even enough to combat attrition in most places.

One of the things I learned in the business world is when drilling into a problem, ask “why” until you get to the root of the problem… and anything less than 5 whys is staying too superficial.

Why is the multi-site movement growing when destination churches are plateauing or declining? Is the cost of gas really a deep seated reason or just an excuse when the motivation level drops to an ambivalent level. If you notice, the drop in driving is about the same percentage-wise as when we had the Oil Embargo and high oil prices under Jimmy Carter. That hardship didn’t seem to dent the growth of the Evangelical movement.

Perhaps the next “why” down is why is a relatively small challenge is causing the ambivalent to not seek out a church that “meets more of their needs”? If even a church that meets more of their needs isn’t meeting enough of the needs to draw them in, there is a deeper issue still going down.

So what do you think is the next “why” in this chain?

John Kissinger [01/26/2016 8:00 PM]
Do you think 100,000 churches is a realistic figure for 2016? Does this statistics fit your area of ministry?http://churchinfluence.com/2015-state-of-the-megachurch-report-recent-shifts-in-americas-largest-protestant-churches/

John Kissinger [01/28/2016 1:33 PM]

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This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.