What do you think, theologically, about the new tax proposal?

Posted by Jim Price in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

What do you think, theologically, about the new tax proposal that gives hugh tax breaks to the very rich and will very likely put more burden in one way or the other on the working class?

8 Comments

  • Reply April 27, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Proposed a discussion on TAX laws to Stan Wayne when the tax bill was still news, not in legislation yet. Now that’s a official legislation HOW does it change the initial view on Trump and taxes? Does he have to show his before he changes ours? http://www.pentecostaltheology.com/trump-taxes-and-theology/

  • Reply April 27, 2017

    Jim Price

    No law says that the president has to reveal his taxes but since he likes to brag about his wealth you have to wonder if there isn’t something in the wood pile. Many of his debtors might be shocked at little his true wealth is and many who he has bankrupted on would be mad if he truly is worth 10 billion or so. A lot of different people might well see his return in a different way.

  • Reply April 27, 2017

    Paul Jones

    The wealthy like making money. If their tax rate is such that it PAYS them to invest, they will. If not, they’ll sit on it. Reduce the tax rate and let them put people to work. It was effective for Kennedy. It was effective for Reagan.

  • Reply April 28, 2017

    Varnel Watson

    Jim Price Law or morality? The people are entitled to know if their president is keeping the Constitution. True or false?

  • Reply April 15, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    BY ACCEPTING FEDERAL AID, RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS MAY SUBJECT THEMSELVES TO STATE LAW MANDATES.
    Under some state laws, acceptance of government aid – even federal aid – triggers new legal obligations and restrictions. For example, the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Act (CADA) generally prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of religion, sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity. CADA expressly exempts “any religious organization” from these requirements. But the exemption is lost if the organization “is supported in whole or in part by money raised by taxation or public borrowing.” C.R.S. § 24-34-402(7).

    Even without this exemption, CADA still permits religious organizations to select employees based upon religious preference. But as with Title VII, this may not permit an employer to discriminate based on other protected classes, such as sexual orientation and gender identity.

    Most Colorado churches and ministries aren’t subject to CADA because they’re not supported by government aid. But accepting PPP or EIDL loans could change that and cause an organization to lose at least some of its religious exemption.

    BE CAREFUL
    Many religious organizations find themselves in dire straits as a result of this crisis. And each will have to balance the economic threat to their operations with the legal risks that come with accepting the government’s help. Every church and ministry will have decide for itself how to strike that balance. But each should go into it with eyes wide open, mindful of the potential costs to their mission and values. As always, you should consult with an attorney regarding your specific situation.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NhKH91nvJg&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR3_Hqh8KmCrHvi8KJBTO8aKaPJ0ifa76Zurzmqi5o5WGPCUjFk2q3jOOIs

  • Reply April 17, 2020

    Chris Baudean

    When we sign up as a 501-3 C we state that the government is the sole authority over our church what you do after that is inconsequential

    • Reply April 17, 2020

      Varnel Watson

      where doe it say it means that?

    • Reply April 17, 2020

      Chris Baudean

      Troy Day look up incorporations of a 501 C3 in your local government incorporation documents to incorporate a church.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.