Rapture To Be or Not To Be

777 The Rapture To Be or Not To Be
Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

12 Comments

  • Reply September 2, 2020

    Troy Day

    YES to BE Alan Smith Ray E Horton Isara Mo

    • Reply September 2, 2020

      Isara Mo

      Troy Day
      What IF there is NO CHURCH?.
      Will Jesus rapture a carnal minded church or a religious church or sin filled church?..
      Conjecture VS Reality

    • Reply September 2, 2020

      Isara Mo

      Troy Day
      By the way Troy if there be a church to be ruptured will it be the Catholic church, The Pentecostal Church Jehova Witness or Advents, Oneness or what? ..
      Or will it be just CHURCH as is often used in regard to people…
      Everyone has THEIR church lol

    • Reply September 2, 2020

      Ray E Horton

      Isara Mo The church is the people of God – nothing to do with denominations.

    • Reply September 2, 2020

      Barbara Ann Wolfe

      Church is not a building or a “religion”! It’s God’s Children. Those that have accepted him as their Savior as John 3:16 tells us.

  • Reply September 2, 2020

    Alan Smith

    Jesus didn’t say HE was coming back for a Church Isara Mo, HE IS coming back for his bride. Humans made the church, humans run the church, GOD is building a kingdom.
    Ps 127:1 Unless God builds the house, the work of the labors are waisted (NLT)
    God needed a tabernacle for HIM to dwell with His people, but now He needs a vessel. His Ruach Ha-Kodesh lives IN US, His people!

    • Reply September 2, 2020

      Isara Mo

      Alan Smith
      Can you call a bride a bride if she doesn’t have wedding clothes on?
      Just thinking..

    • Reply September 2, 2020

      Alan Smith

      Isara Mo yes

  • Reply September 2, 2020

    Keith Day

    the word rapture is not in the Bible but the doctrine that has become know as the rapture in which the saints will be caught up to be with the Lord is found in these verses………….1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 (KJV)
    But I would not have you to be ignorant, brethren, concerning them which are asleep, that ye sorrow not, even as others which have no hope.
    For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him.
    For this we say unto you by the word of the Lord, that we which are alive and remain unto the coming of the Lord shall not prevent them which are asleep.
    For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first:
    Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord.
    Wherefore comfort one another with these words.

    • Reply September 3, 2020

      Troy Day

      Actually the word RAPTURE – harpazzo in Greek translated rappire in the Latin is very much in the Bible What Bible are you reading that has deleted it for you?

    • Reply September 4, 2020

      Kent Wall

      It’s Rapiemur in the Latin Vulgate.

  • Reply September 5, 2020

    Troy Day

    Kent Wall actually the word rapture is literaly
    raptUM from the verb rapiO – to grab, to rapture

    You are referring to the Latin form of the verb which is rapiemur used in Jerome’s translation of the Greek word ἁρπαγησόμεθα. This is a faithful translation, using a form of the Latin verb rapiō, “to catch up” or “take away”.

    The Greek word from this term “rapture” is derived appears in 1 Thessalonians 4:17, translated “caught up.” The Latin translation of this verse used the word rapturo. The Greek word it translates is harpazo, which means to snatch or take away. Elsewhere it is used to describe how the Spirit caught up Philip near Gaza and brought him to Caesarea (Acts 8:39) and to describe Paul’s experience of being caught up into the third heaven (2 Cor. 12:2-4). Thus there can be no doubt that the word is used in 1 Thessalonians 4:17 to indicate the actual removal of people from earth to heaven.

    Don’t be fooled by the superficial differences between Latin rapio and Greek harpazō. The -αζω (-azō) on the end of ̔αρπαζω (harpazō) is not part of the shared stem but a common Koine Greek verb ending. And the rough breather, the “h”, at the beginning, is not part of the shared stem either. The shared stem is simply “rap” — rap in Latin and ρ-π (r-p) in Greek.

    The fact is, harpazō and rapio belong to a class of Greek and Latin cognates where Greek adds an “h” to the shared stem. Another example from this class is Greek ̔ιστημι (histēmi) and Latin sto. Here again, neither the “h” at the beginning nor the -μι (-mi) verb ending are part of the shared stem. The stem is stē in Greek and sto in Latin. And it is sta in English, from whence we get words like stand and standard.

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