Perfection

Perfection
Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

Perfection: 1.Jn.1:7 shows us that light, walking ,etc are all interrelated. Walking and light and both intersect. If we walk in the light. No evil is present. Then we sin, we get dirty and distant. Jesus became sin for us, he became dirty. Jesus is bringing us near to God.

We are made useful for the father’s use.

Purity of heart refers to the whole heart in integrity. Impurity is a violations of moral integrity, grieves the Spirit and breaks fellowship.

We need to be single hearted, pure in heart.

We loose the doctrine of perfection, not by voted it out, but by indifference.

Biblical perfection is not a perfectionism. Beyond Perfectionism there is no further development. Biblical perfection includes also being tempt-able.

Heb.10,10 Perfection is crises development.

Perfection is in the OT and NT integrity.

Perfection is integrity along the line, of maturation and it is the process of riping. It began in the beginning of Christian life, and in essential to love. Perfection is connected with love, that’s why perfection has been so long neglected.

James 1:15. The word is desire, we are not tempted of what we don’t desire. When desire has conceived, he brings sin, thus death. There is progression of sin. Desire, sin, death

13 Comments

  • Reply November 26, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    its the MOST important thing for Christians TODAY Melvin Harter Joe Absher We talk too much in prayer cause we are afraid if we hush God may tell us things we don’t want to hear and ask us to do things we don’t want to do
    We don’t want to keep quite in the presence of God because we don’t know how to deal with silence and because in the silence our own problems come out and we are afraid to deal with them

  • Reply November 26, 2019

    Mike Partyka

    Biblical perfection includes being temp-table. I think people miss this fact. Without temptation there would only be sin.

  • Reply November 26, 2019

    George Hartwell

    Isn’t the proper meaning coming to maturity?

    • Reply November 26, 2019

      Joe Absher

      It’s one definition . but with that approach comes excuses for sin . the babe in Christ can be pure and walking in victory by faith in Jesus Christ

    • Reply November 26, 2019

      George Hartwell

      I hope you don’t raise your kids like that!

    • Reply November 26, 2019

      Joe Absher

      I actually thought us was talk to a grown man sorry about that

    • Reply November 26, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      has to happen in this life time

    • Reply November 26, 2019

      George Hartwell

      The pursuit of perfection may lead to denial of one’s temptations and impulses. They get pushed into the unconscious and become breeding ground for the work of evil. I am uncomfortable with this direction in Christian thinking.

    • Reply November 27, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      George Hartwell not so easy I would say MANY escape from the Christian responsibility and would say CHRIST in the last day will perfect us ALL – WELL Christ did perfect us on the Cross in a positional way as RichardAnna Boyce would claim and upon salvation he expects we take this position and occupy it right then not in some far distant time He said BE HOLY not you shall be or will be holy in the future Melvin Harter its a command a Christian should not reject in this lifetime

    • Reply November 28, 2019

      George Hartwell

      Troy I find every discussion here is limited to verse-based theology and doctrine and I am trying to inject an objection based on reality. At the source of prejudice and genocide is the mechanism of projection – what we deny in ourselves we project on others. they become the scapegoat. Jung talks about what we deny in ourselves, refuse to face and acknowledge, we put into our shadow as he called it. Loading up our shadow self and projecting our sin on others is immature and unholy. Paradoxically Christian talk and teaching on perfection will and does cover up our sinful nature and lead to personal and social dysfunction. I would be much happier if interpreters would use a definition of ‘perfect’ that did not put so much unreasonable expectation of people to be perfect. Do I need to remind you that we can’t be perfect? “No man is good.” Christ in us will lead us toward maturity but not if we try to ‘be perfect’ or ‘be holy’ on our own strength. Of course, our carnal nature cannot do that. When our carnal nature or even conscious self tries to do so, it messes us up beyond what anyone might imagine.

    • Reply November 28, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      George Hartwell saved means that one has been saved, is being saved, and will be saved. That is important. Saves is used in various context, e.g. in the house of Cornelius. Peter does not go for the initial salvation of Cornelius, as Evangelicals point out. There is so much characteristics of salvation in Cornelius, and he was already saved. Peter indicates, “you know that of Jesus Christ”, Peter does not go to show initial aspects, but to show further aspects of salvation, which was the fulfillment of John’s promise – the Holy Spirit baptism.

      Salvation is never a punctual event, but part of the process in life. In the same way a birth is not only one punctual event, but part of a greater event, starting from conception, through a crown man. The “covenant” of life is the overall covenant of God with Adam and Eve. Their obedience was always their response to the love and live of God.

      The covenant of life was re-introduced on the bases of grace. The human sin is overcome by the power of grace. Life in Christ is a life in faith and obedience.

      We are not saved, from the experience in the past, but on the bases of the grace which works presently.

      God is from initial faith to their fulfillment in Christ. Faith is not a punctivity, as repentance is not punctitive. If we are not in a state of repentance we move to a state of hardness. Faith is always in the process of perpetuity. We shall not do witness, but we shall be by nature witness. By nature we are a witness, and confession is conceptually made and renewed, and made continually fresh.

      Obedience can become a cultural thing, and this is very dangerous, because doing the right thing is an act as obedience to God. We are always in the immediate present of God. This is not a threat, but it is a loving presence, and I know that God is seeing and hearing me in every moment of my being. God knows my sin, too, and I am glad. We are not confessing to an enemy, but we are confessing to a father. It is a rejection o our side, when we hide our sins from God.

      We have treaded law as if it is a synonym of legalism, law is a framework in which we structure our obedience to God. That’s David can say “I love your law”.

      Obedience is always living out, that which is formed within. That calls for the removal of the law of sin and death. “being free from the law of sin”, from here we go on to perfection by transformation and being cleansed within.

  • Reply November 26, 2019

    Joe Absher

    Psalm 50:2 KJV — Out of Zion, the perfection of beauty, God hath shined.

  • Reply November 26, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    be ye holy as I am… not just positional

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