Did Jesus go to Hell between His Death and Resurrection?

Did Jesus go to Hell between His Death and Resurrection?
| PentecostalTheology.com

It is surprising to find that the phrase “he descended into hell” was not found in any of the early versions of the Creed (in the versions used in Rome, in the rest of Italy, and in Africa) until it appeared in one of two versions from Rufinus in A.D. 390.

Then it was not included again in any version of the Creed until A.D. 650.

Moreover, Rufinus, the only person who included it before A.D. 650, did not think that it meant that Christ descended into hell, but understood the phrase simply to mean that Christ was “buried.” In other words, he took it to mean that Christ “descended into the grave.” (The Greek form has hadēs, which can mean just “grave,” not geenna, “hell, place of punishment.”).

We should also note that the phrase only appears in one of the two versions of the Creed that we have from Rufinus: it was not in the Roman form of the Creed that he preserved.

This means, therefore, that until A.D. 650 no version of the Creed included this phrase with the intention of saying that Christ “descended into hell”—and the only version to include the phrase before A.D. 650 gives it a different meaning.

Later when the phrase was incorporated into different versions of the Creed that already had the phrase “and buried,” some other explanation had to be given to it.

There have been three possible meanings proposed throughout church history:

  1. Some take this phrase to mean that Christ suffered the pains of hell while on the cross. Calvin takes this approach, as does the Heidelberg Catechism.
  2. Others have understood it to mean that Christ continued in the “state of death” until his resurrection. The Westminster Larger Catechism, Question 50 takes this approach: “Christ’s humiliation after his death consisted in his being buried, and continuing in the state of the dead, and under the power of death till the third day; which hath been otherwise expressed in these words, He descended into hell.”
  3. Finally, some have argued that the phrase means just what it appears to mean on first reading: that Christ actually did descend into hell after his death on the cross.

What does the Bible say? 5 passages used to support the descent into hell

There are five Bible passages used to support the idea that Christ really did descend into hell between his death and resurrection.

1. Acts 2:27

This is part of Peter’s sermon on the Day of Pentecost, where he quotes Psalm 16:10: “because you will not abandon me to the realm of the dead [KJV: “leave my soul in hell”], nor will you let your faithful one see decay.”

Does this mean Jesus entered hell? Not necessarily. Peter is using David’s psalm to show that Christ’s body did not decay—he is therefore unlike David, who “died and was buried, and his tomb is here to this day”

2. Romans 10:6–7

These verses contain two rhetorical questions, again Old Testament quotations (from Deut. 30:13): “Do not say in your heart, ‘Who will ascend into heaven?’ (that is, to bring Christ down) or ‘Who will descend into the abyss?’ (that is, to bring Christ up from the dead).”

But this passage hardly teaches that Christ descended into hell. The point of the passage is that Paul is telling people not to ask these questions, because Christ is not far away—he is near—and faith in him is as near as confessing with our mouth and believing in our heart (v. 9).

3. Ephesians 4:8–9

Here Paul writes, “In saying, ‘He ascended,’ what does it mean but that he had also descended into the lower parts of the earth?”

Does this mean that Christ “descended” to hell?

It is at first unclear what is meant by “the lower parts of the earth,” but another translation seems to give the best sense: “What does ‘he ascended’ mean except that he also descended to the lower, earthly regions?” (NIV). Here the NIV takes “descended” to refer to Christ’s coming to earth as a baby (the Incarnation). The last four words are an acceptable understanding of the Greek text, taking the phrase “the lower regions of the earth” to mean “lower regions which are the earth.”

Paul is saying that the Christ who went up to heaven (in his ascension) is the same one who earlier came down from heaven (v. 10). That “descent” from heaven occurred, of course, when Christ came to be born as a man. So the verse speaks of the incarnation, not of a descent into hell.

4. 1 Peter 3:18–20

This passage says: “For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, to bring you to God. He was put to death in the body but made alive in the Spirit. After being made alive, he went and made proclamation to the imprisoned spirits—to those who were disobedient long ago when God waited patiently in the days of Noah while the ark was being built.”

For many people this is the most puzzling passage on this entire subject. Let’s unpack several questions surrounding this text:

Does 1 Peter 3:18–20 refer to Christ preaching in hell?

Some have taken “he went and preached to the spirits in prison” to mean that Christ went into hell and preached to the spirits who were there—either proclaiming the gospel and offering a second chance to repent, or just proclaiming that he had triumphed over them and that they were eternally condemned.

But these interpretations fail to explain adequately either the passage itself or its setting in this context. Peter does not say that Christ preached to spirits generally, but only to those “who formerly did not obey…during the building of the ark.” Such a limited audience—those who disobeyed during the building of the ark—would be a strange group for Christ to travel to hell and preach to.

If Christ proclaimed his triumph, why only to these sinners and not to all? And if he offered a second chance for salvation, why only to these sinners and not to all? Even more difficult for this view is the fact that Scripture elsewhere indicates that there is no opportunity for repentance after death (Luke 16:26; Heb. 10:26–27).

Moreover, the context of 1 Peter 3 makes “preaching in hell” unlikely. Peter is encouraging his readers to witness boldly to hostile unbelievers around them. He just told them to “always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you” (1 Peter 3:15 NIV). This evangelistic motif would lose its urgency if Peter were teaching a second chance for salvation after death. And it would not fit at all with a “preaching” of condemnation.

Does 1 Peter 3:18–20 refer to Christ preaching to fallen angels?

To give a better explanation for these difficulties, several commentators have proposed taking “spirits in prison” to mean demonic spirits, the spirits of fallen angels, and have said that Christ proclaimed condemnation to these demons. This (it is claimed) would comfort Peter’s readers by showing them that the demonic forces oppressing them would also be defeated by Christ.

However, Peter’s readers would have to go through an incredibly complicated reasoning process to draw this conclusion when Peter does not explicitly teach it. They would have to reason from (1) some demons who sinned long ago were condemned, to (2) other demons are now inciting your human persecutors, to (3) those demons will likewise be condemned someday, to (4) therefore your persecutors will finally be judged as well. Finally Peter’s readers would get to Peter’s point: (5) Therefore don’t fear your persecutors.

Does it not seem too farfetched to say that Peter knew his readers would read all this into the text?

Moreover, Peter emphasizes hostile persons, not demons, in the context (1 Peter 3:14, 16). And where would Peter’s readers get the idea that angels sinned “during the building of the ark”? There is nothing of that in the Genesis story about the building of the ark. And (in spite of what some have claimed), if we look at all the traditions of Jewish interpretation of the flood story, we find no mention of angels sinning specifically “during the building of the ark.” Therefore the view that Peter is speaking of Christ’s proclamation of judgment to fallen angels is really not persuasive either.

Does 1 Peter 3:18–20 refer to Christ’s proclaiming release to Old Testament saints?

Another explanation is that Christ, after his death, went and proclaimed release to Old Testament believers who had been unable to enter heaven until the completion of Christ’s redemptive work.

But again we may question whether this view adequately accounts for what the text actually says. It does not say that Christ preached to those who were believers or faithful to God, but to those “who formerly did not obey”—the emphasis is on their disobedience. Moreover, Peter does not specify Old Testament believers generally, but only those who were disobedient “in the days of Noah, during the building of the ark” (1 Peter 3:20).

Finally, Scripture gives us no clear evidence to make us think that full access to the blessings of being in God’s presence in heaven were withheld from Old Testament believers when they died—indeed, several passages suggest that believers who died before Christ’s death did enter into the presence of God at once because their sins were forgiven by trusting in the Messiah who was to come (Gen. 5:24; 2 Sam. 12:23; Pss. 16:11; 17:15; 23:6; Eccl. 12:7; Matt. 22:31–32; Luke 16:22; Rom. 4:1–8; Heb. 11:5).

A more satisfying explanation of 1 Peter 3:18–20

The most satisfactory explanation of 1 Peter 3:18–20 seems rather to be one proposed (but not really defended) long ago by Augustine: the passage refers not to something Christ did between his death and resurrection, but to what he did “in the spiritual realm of existence” (or “through the Spirit”) at the time of Noah. When Noah was building the ark, Christ “in spirit” was preaching through Noah to the hostile unbelievers around him.

This interpretation is very appropriate to the larger context of 1 Peter 3:13–22. The parallel between the situation of Noah and the situation of Peter’s readers is clear at several points:

  • Both were a religious minority
  • Both were surrounded by hostile unbelievers
  • Both were facing the possibility of imminent judgment
  • Both were to witness
  • Both were finally saved

Such an understanding of 1 Peter 3:18–20 seems to be by far the most likely solution to a puzzling passage.

5. 1 Peter 4:6

This fifth and final passage that supports Jesus’ descent into hell says, “For this is why the gospel was preached even to the dead, that though judged in the flesh like men, they might live in the spirit like God.”

Does this verse mean that Christ went to hell and preached the gospel to those who had died? If so, it would be the only passage in the Bible that taught a “second chance” for salvation after death and would contradict passages such as Luke 16:19–31 and Hebrews 9:27, which clearly seem to deny this possibility.

Moreover, the passage does not explicitly say that Christ preached to people after they had died, and could rather mean that the gospel in general was preached (this verse does not even say that Christ preached) to people who are now dead, but that it was preached to them while they were still alive on earth.

This is a common explanation, and it seems to fit this verse much better. It finds support in the second word of the verse, “this,” which refers back to the final judgment mentioned at the end of verse 5. Peter is saying that it was because of the final judgment that the gospel was preached to the dead.

Thus, “the dead” are people who have died and are now dead, even though they were alive and on earth when the gospel was preached to them.

We conclude, therefore, that this last passage, when viewed in its context, turns out to provide no convincing support for the doctrine of a descent of Christ into hell.

Learn more in the
Systematic Theology online course, taught by Wayne Grudem

3 passages that indicate Jesus did not descend to hell

In addition to the fact that there is little if any biblical support for a descent of Christ into hell, there are some New Testament texts that argue against the possibility of Christ’s going to hell after his death.

1. Luke 23:43

Jesus’ words to the thief on the cross, “Today you will be with me in Paradise” (Luke 23:43), imply that after Jesus died his soul (or spirit) went immediately to the presence of the Father in heaven, even though his body remained on earth and was buried.

Some people deny this by arguing that “Paradise” is a place distinct from heaven, but in both of the other New Testament uses the word clearly means “heaven”: in 2 Corinthians 12:4 it is the place to which Paul was caught up in his revelation of heaven, and in Revelation 2:7 it is the place where we find the tree of life–which is clearly heaven in Revelation 22:2 and 14.

2. John 19:30

In addition, the cry of Jesus, “It is finished” (John 19:30) strongly suggests that Christ’s suffering was finished at that moment and so was his alienation from the Father because of bearing our sin. This implies that he would not descend into hell, but would go at once into the Father’s presence.

3. Luke 23:46

Finally, the cry, “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit” (Luke 23:46), also suggests that Christ expected (correctly) the immediate end of his suffering and estrangement and the welcoming of his spirit into heaven by God the Father (note Stephen’s similar cry in Acts 7:59).

If Jesus didn’t descend into hell, then what happened when he died?

These texts indicate, then, that Christ in his death experienced the same things believers in this present age experience when they die: his dead body remained on earth and was buried (as ours will be), but his spirit (or soul) passed immediately into the presence of God in heaven (just as ours will).

Then on the first Easter morning, Christ’s spirit was reunited with his body and he was raised from the dead—just as Christians who have died will (when Christ returns) be reunited to their bodies and raised in their perfect resurrection bodies to new life.

This fact has pastoral encouragement for us: we need not fear death, not only because eternal life lies on the other side, but also because we know that our Savior himself has gone through exactly the same experience we will go through—he has prepared, even sanctified the way, and we follow him with confidence each step of that way.

81 Comments

  • Reply April 20, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    now that is one interesting question Philip Williams

  • Reply April 20, 2019

    Nora Neel-Toney

    Yes He did. Read your Bible

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Isara Mo

      Nora Neel-Toney
      Plse give the scripture that shows Jesus went to hell…
      Is hell different from the lake of fire?

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Nora Neel-Toney

      Isara Mo I’ll look it up. Matthew chapter 2 verse 40. There are several references even in the Old Testament that talks of those days.

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Nora Neel-Toney

      Isara Mo The lake of fire is Hell

    • Reply April 21, 2019

      Isara Mo

      Nora Neel-Toney
      Blessed are you

    • Reply April 21, 2019

      Isara Mo

      Nora Neel-Toney
      By the way Nora,
      When was hell(lake of fire created?)
      In Genesis narration there is no mention of lake of fire..?

    • Reply April 21, 2019

      Nora Neel-Toney

      There are many references in the Bible concerning Hell starting in the Old Testament. Deuterium 32:22

    • Reply April 23, 2019

      Nora Neel-Toney

      Isara Mo do a search on the internet for faithfulwordbaptist.org. There is a sermon that gives scriptures on Jesus spending 3 days in Hell. Here are scriptures for it: Psalms 16:10, Acts 2:31, Jonah 2:2 and verses 5, Matt 12:40, Psalms 139:8, Romans 10:9. I pray these will help you. God bless

    • Reply April 23, 2019

      Isara Mo

      Nora Neel-Toney
      Thks Nora I will read thru

    • Reply April 23, 2019

      Isara Mo

      Nora Neel-Toney
      New World Order?
      No comment?

    • Reply April 24, 2019

      Nora Neel-Toney

      Isara Mo there is a New World coming. Sooner than we think.

    • Reply April 24, 2019

      Isara Mo

      Nora Neel-Toney
      Spiritual or carnal?

    • Reply April 24, 2019

      Nora Neel-Toney

      Isara Mo carnal

  • Reply April 20, 2019

    Jim Brantley

    He went to paradise. Remember his words… “Today thou shall be with me in paradise.”

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Isara Mo

      Jim Brantley
      So He did not go to hades(sheol), hell or any other place but to paradise?
      Scriptures has it that He went to preach to ” imprisoned souls”…(epistle of Peter?

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Isara Mo

      Jim Brantley
      The Book of Acts says he was seen by over 500 people over a period of 40 days…after His resurrection..
      So if He went to paradise on THAT DAY He possibly came back and stayed another 39 days?(just thinking)…
      In the Gospel of John when He appeared to Mary Madgalene, He told her not to touch Him because He had not ascended to His Father…but He directed Mary to go to the disciples to inform them that He had risen..

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Isara Mo

      Isara Mo
      Jesus said, “Do not hold on to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father. Go instead to my brothers and tell them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’ ”
      John 20:17 NIV

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Isara Mo

      On the evening of that first day of the week, when the disciples were together, with the doors locked for fear of the Jewish leaders, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you!”
      John 20:19 NIV

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Isara Mo

      Isara Mo
      On the EVENING of THAT FIRST DAY(OF HIS RESURRECTION.) …?
      If Jesus Had spoken with Mary in the morning of that day, the whole afternoon of that day He was absent(possibly in Heaven…or Paradise(?) or Sheol or Hell…then after finishing whatever business He was doing He appeared to His disciples in the EVENING of the same day…
      To Mary He said He was ascending to the Father….

    • The followers of E. W. KENYON said he died spiritual on the cross (made sin) and went to hell and suffered and then on the third day he was born again (or restored Godliness with all power) and rose up and defeated Satan and his horde! He then took away the Keyes and victoriously crossed the Gulf and rescued the righteous and took captivity captive and ascended into heaven…. while the rest of us belive that he defended into hell victorius and took away the keys and led captivity captivate and ascended into heaven…

    • Reply April 21, 2019

      Nora Neel-Toney

      Jim Brantley Jesus meant after His resurrection

  • Reply April 20, 2019

    Steve Losee

    NO, Scripture does NOT teach that He went to the place of eternal torment. And He certainly never suffered there! 1 Pet. 3:18 & 19 don’t teach that, and biblical cosmology shows that Sheol/Hades was not the same as Gehenna.

  • Reply April 20, 2019

    Charles Page

    He went to hades and not to paradise, the whole need not further announcement of redemption. He went as always to the lost sheep and specifically to the Noahic sheep imprisoned in Hades.

  • Reply April 20, 2019

    Ray E Horton

    I was ready to challenge this out of traditional belief until reading the article, which addresses the subject thoroughly and is very convincing. Did you write it, brother Troy Day?

  • Reply April 20, 2019

    Philip Williams

    He didn’t then harrow Hell, but he did go there to preach to those who died in the Flood and to take Abraham and those resting with Abraham to Heaven upon his ascension 40 days later.

  • Reply April 20, 2019

    Isara Mo

    Why is there no straight answer to this question?

  • Reply April 20, 2019

    Jim Brantley

    The straight answer comes from the lips of Jesus which I have already stated. What’s hard to believe?

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Isara Mo

      Jim Brantley
      After being made alive, he went and made proclamation to the imprisoned spirits—
      1 Peter 3:19 NIV
      Is paradise where imprisoned spirits dwell?

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Jim Brantley

      Isara Mo only to those who believed in his coming. Notice he didn’t tell the doubting thief what he told the believing thief.

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Jim Brantley

      Those in Paradise still had to accept HIM as the one.

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      didnt they already accept him by believing he was to come – – – how else did they get to the said paradizo?

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Jim Brantley

      Troy Day they looked for the coming Messiah.

    • Reply April 20, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      and that’s how they were saved through faith alone

    • Reply April 21, 2019

      Thangsan Hisfootstep

      This passage is not about Passion Weekend, but it’s about the time before the flood, when eternal Logos (Word of God) came to the people of pre-flood age through the mouth of Noah. However, the problem is that people didn’t listen to Noah as many do to us today, so their souls are imprisoned now. This is how we should read this passage (1 Peter 3:19).

  • Reply April 21, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    I think its straight forward too

  • Reply April 23, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    in very common and vary basic
    systematic theology even by baptist Ericson
    7 steps descending down to hades
    7 steps ascending up to the heavens

  • Reply April 23, 2019

    Gary Micheal Epping

    It is clear that Christ died on the cross. The roman soldiers would not take him down until he was dead. His body was wrapped and placed in the tomb. Until after his resurrection, the Old Testament teaches life after death, and that all people went to a place of conscious existence called Sheol. This would include the sprit of Jesus. The wicked were there (Psalm 9:17; 31:17; 49:14; Isa 5:14), and so were the righteous (Gen 37:35; 42:38; 2 Sam 22:6; Job
    14:13; Psalm 88:3; Eccl 9:10; Isa 38:10; Jonah 2:2).
    The New Testament term for Sheol is Hades. Prior to His death and resurrection, in Luke 16:19-31, Jesus taught that Hades was divided into two sections: a place of comfort where the poor man Lazarus went after he died, and a place of torment where the rich man (who refused to feed poor Lazarus while the two men were alive) went after he died. In this same passage Jesus taught that there was a ‘great chasm’ between the two sides of Hades (Lk 16:26), but that people could see each other across the chasm, and even speak to each other at times (Lk 16:23-25).
    But, Hades could not hold Jesus as he had never commited a sin. Rather, the Scripture says that after Jesus died He descended into Hades to preach to the saints who were there. It was at this
    time that all of these pre-Jesus saints were saved and moved to Heaven, where they now await the Resurrection of their
    bodies. All believers who have died since then go directly to Heaven and join them. Hades still exists, but it now contains
    only the souls of dead. Hell could not hold Jesus, nor the captives that he set free. So, it is clear that Jesus was not taking a breather and resting up during the three days.

  • Reply April 23, 2019

    William DeArteaga

    No, he went to Sheol, and there preached to the “disobedient spirits” 1 Peter 3&4

    • Reply April 23, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      now where is Sheol now?

    • Reply April 23, 2019

      Gary Micheal Epping

      What good would it do to preach to ‘disobedient spirits’ if you are referring to those in the place of torment, as there is no way for them to repent and get out. Only the saints in the place of comfort could be preached to and then taken out of hades to heaven.

    • Reply April 24, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      the preaching part is more of a karuzo – proclamation of the resurrection victory over sin and death

  • Reply April 10, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    tell us now Ray E Horton Neil Steven Lawrence

  • Reply April 10, 2020

    William DeArteaga

    No he preached to the “disobedient spirits” in “prison” i.e. shoel as in 1 Peter 3 & 4, lookit p.

  • Reply April 10, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    isnt their prison in hell – where else is it ?

  • Reply April 10, 2020

    Ray E Horton

    WHERE WAS JESUS IN SPIRIT BETWEEN HIS DEATH AND RESURRECTION?

    I believe instantly with the Father. After that, the creeds tell us He descended into hell to defeat the devil, although the devil suffered his ultimate defeat at the Cross. The creeds are incorrect. Jesus did not go to the place of eternal suffering.

    Jesus said to the thief beside Him, “Today you will be with me in paradise” (Luke 23:43). That’s the more likely answer. Paradise, “Abraham’s bosom,” was the place where believers went before the cross, awaiting redemption. He “set the captives free.”

    I really appreciate Darrell Chipman’s explanation: “We know our Lord descended to Paradise (Abraham’s Bosom-the place that people went and were held that were pleasing to God). Our Lord took these out of That place and took them to the surface with Him. Which was evidenced by them appearing to many. After 40 days when He rose to Heaven, he took those captives with Him. No one could enter Heaven until Christ paid the price for us all. Thank God He did this for us all.”

  • Reply April 10, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    I think Jesus went to pick them up and took the keys too

    • Reply April 10, 2020

      Ray E Horton

      Troy Day, check messages – I just sent you a message you might want to see right away.

    • Reply April 10, 2020

      Varnel Watson

      Ray E Horton I think I did already Hence my statement

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      Neil Steven Lawrence

      Troy Day “keys” -don’t irritate me!

  • Reply April 11, 2020

    Thangsan Hisfootstep

    Think that we need to read the passage in its immediate literary context. Not “eisegesis” but “exegesis.”

  • Reply April 11, 2020

    Neil Steven Lawrence

    Jesus did not go to hell after the cross; he did not need to defeat the devil anymore; he did not need to take keys that God never gave away; he did not take unbelievers out of hell up to heaven that contradicts all kinds of scriptures!

    Hell is not under the earth; when someone dies their soul does not sleep, but they either go to be with God directly or go to be separated from him directly in hell.

  • Reply April 11, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    did he Doyle Rogers Poppy Thompson ?

  • Reply April 11, 2020

    Stan Cooke

    No
    Christ went to the underworld or Hades. He preached to those in paradise and hell. He led those people that were in paradise to heaven and presented them to the father.

  • Reply April 11, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    Stan Cooke underworld = Hades = hell NOW where was paradise to begin with?

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      Ray E Horton

      Troy Day Two sides. Two sides to Sheol, Hades and Paradise/Abraham’s bosom.

  • Reply April 11, 2020

    David Singh

    Wow! There is so much of Arminian and Calvinistic doctrine on this site. Most all the teachings are from a Dispensationalist background. It is amazing in these days when present truths are revealed that men could hold on to doctrines of men, set forth by religious organizations. This is all I have to say on this topic!

  • Reply April 11, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    David Singh you are quite wrong of course! This is not a site but a group first of all. Second being Wesleyan Pentecostal we are not Calvinistic and since as Pentecostals we are continuallists we cannot be dispensational. Please make sure you have a correct understanding of Pentecostalism before you come out like that

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      Ray E Horton

      Troy Day – I thought Continualists were the opposite of Cessationists. Are you equating Dispensationalists with Cessationists theology. I never saw that as necessarily so. Are not many Dispensationalists also Continualists? I can believe in a dispensational age of grace for the church in which the gifts are for today and the whole age of grace. What am I missing, from your perspective?

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      Varnel Watson

      Ray E Horton This is not an easy question and I doubt one David Singh can answer it per se What we do know is that Dispensationalism limits the Work of the Holy Spirit to one era while we well know gifts worked through both NT and OT Everything but casting out of demons…

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      David Singh

      Troy Day please help me to understand what is a continuallist? Since you are not a Calvinist, then you don’t believe that people will be tortured in hell forever? Just asking?

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      David Singh

      To get to the bottom of this discussion, we must go back to what the Apostles and the early Fathers believe and taught, examine when and where their doctrine changed by which church council. As a Historist and Restorationist we can determine what we believe or should believe, as Paul puts it “present day truths.”

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      David Singh

      Troy Day My apologies to you and the group!

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      Varnel Watson

      David Singh No problem I just wanted to clarify Shouldnt we go back to the BIBLE instead of early Fathers ? Ricky Grimsley Poppy Thompson ||| Ray E Horton you proposed a GREAT question indeed on Dispensationalism Work of the Holy Spirit and continuallists – you should do 3 posts on each soon

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      David Singh

      Troy Day Yes we should, the whole book, but how many today believe the law was done away with, that in itself becomes an obstacle because all the teachings of Jesus will be removed, as He taught strictly from the OT, the Law. Everything we speak or teach must have a second witness, like Jesus his second witness was the Father. The NT is concealed in the OT and the OT is revealed in the NT. We will never fully understand the NT, until we understand the old. God bless!

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      Ray E Horton

      Troy Day Sure, if you find me some extra time. I’d have to do quite a bit of research since my knowledge on the subject is only cursery.

  • Reply April 11, 2020

    Neil Steven Lawrence

    Jesus was only in the grave for 39 hours! If you don’t know this fact maybe you are confused about where he went during that time.

    https://youtu.be/G52f6XYK2dY

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      Ray E Horton

      Without taking the time to listen to an hour + teaching, can you summarize.

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      Varnel Watson

      Ray E Horton that would make it 39+1=40hrs

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      David Singh

      Neil Steven Lawrence Hi Bro., please supply scriptures or types and shadows in the Bible as to how you arrived that Jesus was 39 hours in the grave. I say he was in the grave 3 days and 3 nights as He said and also as Jonah was! Keeping in mind that he physically died at 3 pm on a Friday, as both the weekly sabbath and the Passover sabbath was approaching at dusk! Also He had to arise on the third day Sunday because that is when the high priest waved the sheaf offering of barley at 9am that Sunday morning, which was the exact time that Jesus presented himself to the Father in heaven to receive the kingdom. I await your answer!

    • Reply April 12, 2020

      Neil Steven Lawrence

      Ray E Horton click on the video I posted above, scroll to minutes 31–34 that is where the answer is.

    • Reply April 12, 2020

      Neil Steven Lawrence

      David Singh The video I shared above called “39 Hours“ is the most complex message I’ve ever preached. It is the result of answering these kind of confuse questions for my students. It is difficult to explain in a post what I took hours and hours to prepare for the video message.
      Simply put:
      Jesus said to his father into your hands I commit my spirit
      Jesus told the thief on the cross “today“ you’ll be with me in paradise
      As soon as Jesus gave up his spirit the veil and the temple was torn into

      All these are proves that he went straight to be with the father and did not wait around in the grave like some superstitious people believe.

      According to Jewish law one day was equal to any time spent during the day.
      The Bible is very specific about the timeline of Jesus death and resurrection; and the time in between. The Jewish clock day ends at 6 PM and begins the next day.
      Jesus was only in the grave for 39 hours not 3 – 24 hour periods!

      Fri – 3PM to 6PM
      Sat – 6PM to 6PM
      Sun – 6PM to 6AM (he arose first thing at sunrise)

      The video explains it more completely. But if you are unable to watch one hour to bring clarity then simply watch minutes 31–34.

    • Reply April 12, 2020

      Neil Steven Lawrence

      Ray E Horton The video I shared above called “39 Hours“ is the most complex message I’ve ever preached. It is the result of answering these kind of confuse questions for my students. It is difficult to explain in a post what I took hours and hours to prepare for the video message.
      Simply put:
      Jesus said to his father into your hands I commit my spirit
      Jesus told the thief on the cross “today“ you’ll be with me in paradise
      As soon as Jesus gave up his spirit the veil and the temple was torn into

      All these are proves that he went straight to be with the father and did not wait around in the grave like some superstitious people believe.

      According to Jewish law one day was equal to any time spent during the day.
      The Bible is very specific about the timeline of Jesus death and resurrection; and the time in between. The Jewish clock day ends at 6 PM and begins the next day.
      Jesus was only in the grave for 39 hours not 3 – 24 hour periods!

      Fri – 3PM to 6PM
      Sat – 6PM to 6PM
      Sun – 6PM to 6AM (he arose first thing at sunrise)

      The video explains it more completely. But if you are unable to watch one hour to bring clarity then simply watch minutes 31–34.

    • Reply April 12, 2020

      Ray E Horton

      Neil Steven Lawrence I will watch that section, but you explanation makes complete sense to me.

  • Reply April 11, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    Neil Steven Lawrence I am still waiting on you to present actual Bible verse for that 39hr theory

  • Reply April 11, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    David Singh A continuallist is believer in the ongoing work of the gifts of the Spirit through the ages I am not a Calvinist but I do believe in eternal hell Calvin believe some were created and doomed for eternal hell We dont believe that in Pentecostalism NOW since you like to put your questions in either-or form though there are other options out of your box Are you a Pentecostal – you are either Pentecostal or you are not and from what you posted so far I lean toward the latter

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      David Singh

      Troy Day Thanks for your response. No I am not a Pentecostal, although I grew up in the Pentecostal religion. I am Apostolic in the true sense like Paul, and also believe in full restoration of all things like him. I don’t believe in eternal hell. Everything Jesus taught was from the OT, therefore the Jubilee comes in to play at the end of the millennium age, when all things, including sin, will be totally forgiven for all, no matter how big your sin debt was. These are very long subjects and this is not the medium for it.

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      Varnel Watson

      David Singh Jesus-only Apostolic?

    • Reply April 11, 2020

      David Singh

      Troy Day No not Jesus only. But there is one God!

    • Reply April 12, 2020

      Varnel Watson

      David Singh I dont follow – what are you saying about the OP topic in this discussion ? did HE go to hell?

  • Reply April 12, 2020

    Varnel Watson

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.