Pentecost Sunday: Put Prayer Back in our Schools

Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

18 Comments

  • Reply May 10, 2016

    Troy Day

  • Reply May 10, 2016

    Troy Day

  • Reply May 10, 2016

    Troy Day

    true spirit of prayer is replacing artificial prayer. Believers are waking up to the fact that they prayed wrong. They had agendas in prayer. Pastors prayed as if prayer was a booster rocket for their pet program. Prayer is returning to the raw, unconditional surrender that it was supposed to be all along. https://mariomurilloministries.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/the-william-branham-moment/

  • Mary Ellen Nissley
    Reply July 5, 2016

    Mary Ellen Nissley

    No. I do not support putting prayer back into the Public Schools, by federal decree.
    Why? Because the Federal government would word the law so as to make it “inclusive” in nature.

    Instead of the prayer once heard in American schools, addressed to God, the Father of Jesus Christ, our kids would be learning to pray to Allah, Hare Krishna, Buddha, and any other deity of today’s idolatrous American public.

    In fact, the ONE prayer they would learn NOT to pray, would be to God the Father, through Jesus Christ. Because that’s the only religion rejected by political correct “inclusiveness.”

    If we put prayer back into the schools, before America repents and turns back to God, our children will only be instructed to forsake the true God.

    Psalm 127:1 “Except the LORD build the house, they labor in vain that build it.”

  • Troy Day
    Reply January 17, 2020

    Troy Day

    Eddie L. Hyatt Ed Brewer I remember well when we called for this 4 yrs ago on Pentecost Sunday Ray E Horton William DeArteaga Jim Price is there a slight chance for this to happen like it was back in our day in the 60s https://time.com/5765829/trump-school-prayer-evangelicals/

    • Eddie L. Hyatt
      Reply January 17, 2020

      Eddie L. Hyatt

      My understanding is that this is not a push for pre-1963 school sponsored prayer but for giving religious groups equal access to school facilities and individuals the freedom to express their faith. The issue in 1963 was over forcing non Christians to participate in public school religious exercises. Since 1963, the pendelum has swung to the opposite extreme where there is now a need to affirm the equal rights of religious groups and individuals of faith.

    • Troy Day
      Reply January 18, 2020

      Troy Day

      Eddie L. Hyatt is it a push at all then? The promo had muslim girls as well Is it some sort of Chrislamic prayer or what?

    • Eddie L. Hyatt
      Reply January 18, 2020

      Eddie L. Hyatt

      My understaning is that this is a push for the government NOT to stifle prayer of any sort. For example, not too far from here in Honey Grove, TX a young middle school girl was praying with a friend in the corner of the caferteria when the principle came over and told them to stop, that they if they wanted to pray they would have to go outside or hide out in the gym. First Liberty Institute (an org that defends religius liberty) sent a letter to the school and they immediately responded that the students can pray. That is the sort of thing this new push is addressing and it would apply to a Muslim student that wanted to pray. I would be totally opposed to the govt imposing some generic or Chrislam sort of prayer. It ‘s about individual, religious liberty. The Founders were tolerant because they believed in the power of truth and that if there was a level playing field with no govt interference, Christian truth would prevail.

    • Troy Day
      Reply January 18, 2020

      Troy Day

      Eddie L. Hyatt I have not seen such information connected to the signed document It is more of a modern day application of prayer protection for ALL religions – or not?

    • Eddie L. Hyatt
      Reply January 18, 2020

      Eddie L. Hyatt

      Troy Day I haven’t seen the document itself but my understanding, but based on the reports I have read, is that it protects all kinds of religious prayer as does the First Amendment (although there was an assumption of Christianity in the First Amendment).

    • Troy Day
      Reply January 18, 2020

      Troy Day

      Eddie L. Hyatt maybe thats why So much speculation among evangelicals – hopes its not election gimmick

    • Eddie L. Hyatt
      Reply January 18, 2020

      Eddie L. Hyatt

      Troy Day Thanks for that info.

  • Troy Day
    Reply January 18, 2020

    Troy Day

    Section 8524(b) of the ESEA also requires that, by November 1 of each year, each SEA must send to the Secretary a list of those LEAs that have not filed the required certification or that have been the subject of a complaint to the SEA alleging that the LEA has a policy that prevents, or otherwise denies participation in, constitutionally protected prayer in public elementary and secondary schools. The SEA must provide a process for filing a complaint against an LEA that allegedly denies a person, including a student or employee, the right to participate in constitutionally protected prayer. To the extent the SEA has notice of a public legal charge or complaint such as a lawsuit filed against an LEA, alleging that the LEA denied a person the right to participate in constitutionally protected prayer, the SEA must report the complaint to the Secretary. The SEA must report all complaints that are filed through the process the SEA provides, including complaints that the SEA may deem meritless, to the Secretary. This list should be sent to:

    Office of Elementary and Secondary Education and
    Center for Faith and Opportunity Initiatives
    Attention: Phyllis Knight and Angel Rush
    U.S. Department of Education
    400 Maryland Avenue, S.W.
    Washington, D.C. 20202

    The SEA’s submission should describe what investigation and/or enforcement action the SEA has initiated with respect to each listed LEA and the status of the investigation or action. The SEA should not send the LEA certifications to the Secretary but should maintain these records in accordance with its usual records retention policy.

  • Eddie L. Hyatt
    Reply January 18, 2020

    Eddie L. Hyatt

    Just scanned down this document and thought this was worth sharing.

    A. Prayer During Non-instructional Time
    Students may pray when not engaged in school activities or instruction, subject to the same rules designed to prevent material disruption of the educational program that are applied to other privately initiated expressive activities. Among other things, students may read their Bibles, Torahs, Korans, or other scriptures; say grace before meals; and pray or study religious materials with fellow students during recess, the lunch hour, or other non-instructional time to the same extent that they may engage in nonreligious activities. While school authorities may impose rules of order and pedagogical restrictions on student activities, they may not discriminate against student prayer or religious perspectives in applying such rules and restrictions.

    B. Organized Prayer Groups and Activities
    Students may organize prayer groups, religious clubs, and “see you at the pole” gatherings before school to the same extent that students are permitted to organize other noncurricular student activities groups. Such groups must be given the same access to school facilities for assembling as is given to other noncurricular groups, without discrimination because of the religious perspective of their expression. School authorities possess substantial discretion concerning whether to permit the use of school media for student advertising or announcements regarding noncurricular activities. However, where student groups that meet for nonreligious activities are permitted to advertise or announce their meetings—for example, by advertising in a student newspaper, making announcements on a student activities bulletin board or public address system, or handing out leaflets—school authorities may not discriminate against groups who meet to engage in religious expression such as prayer. School authorities may disclaim sponsorship of noncurricular groups and events, provided they administer such disclaimers in a manner that neither favors nor disfavors groups that meet to engage in prayer or express religious perspectives.

    • Troy Day
      Reply January 18, 2020

      Troy Day

      I posted the link to its whole presentation above BUT what does this mean to us as the church today?

    • Eddie L. Hyatt
      Reply January 18, 2020

      Eddie L. Hyatt

      Yes, thank you for posting it. I see this as an opportunity for individual Christians as well as Christian groups to be much more bold in their witness and outreach on public school campuses.

    • Troy Day
      Reply January 19, 2020

      Troy Day

      Eddie L. Hyatt The document is very very interesting The least to say It does read like evangelicals pulled it out of the dusty shelves of the early 90s BUT still nice to have it out there under attention Maybe non-prayers would finally get it

  • Troy Day
    Reply January 18, 2020

    Troy Day

    William DeArteaga if there is a signed document but Christians dont care to read it and believe it will be like back in the 60s isnt this another CT hoax?

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.