Understand Holy Spirit And Speaking in Tongues

Understand Holy Spirit And Speaking in Tongues
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Understand Holy Spirit And Speaking in Tongues Timothy R. Carter, Ph.D I have incorporated an online article into this Bible study to strengthen the readers’ understanding without having the reader jump around: 5 WAYS THAT PRAYS IN TONGUES WILLS CHANGE YOUR LIFE FORGVER, Charismanews.com by: Larry Sparks Web add no longer available Article: The Origins of the Church at Corinth Robert L. (Bob)Deffinbaugh graduated from Dallas https://bible.org/users/bob-deffinbaugh I have also used the commentary: Expositors Greek New Testament Brother Link Hudson, you were I got the idea “Linguist” from. This is the word this commentary uses.

Speaking in tongues —Let’s examine primary Scripture portions that lead us to understand Holy Spirit better. Acts 1:4-5; 2:1-4 On one occasion, while he was eating with them, he gave them this command: “Do not leave Jerusalem, but wait for the gift my Father promised, which you have heard me speak about. [5] For John baptized with water, but in a few days you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit.” … [2:1] When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. [2] Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. [3] They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. [4] All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them. •• What is unique here? — the speaking in other tongues. •• What is not unique here? — the manifestations of wind and fire. • 1 Kings 19:11 The LORD said [to Elijah], “Go out and stand on the mountain in the presence of the LORD, for the LORD is about to pass by.” Then a great and powerful wind tore the mountains apart and shattered the rocks before the LORD, but the LORD was not in the wind. • 1 Kings 19:12a After the earthquake came a fire, but the LORD was not in the fire. • 1 Kings 19:12b And after the fire came a gentle whisper [KJV: a still small voice]. It was in the voice, the speaking, that Elijah discerned the Lord. So he went out to the mouth of the cave to meet with the Lord who spoke to him. •• Elijah met with God at Mount Horeb. God granted him dramatic manifestations of wind and fire, also an earthquake. But the bible specifically states that “the Lord was not in the wind … not in the fire.” Elijah sensed the Lord in the “still small voice.” •• At Pentecost in Acts 2:1-4, the disciples likewise experienced dramatic, God-sent manifestations of wind and fire — similar to Elijah at Mt. Horeb. But the only unique manifestation on that day of Pentecost was the speaking in tongues, not the wind and fire. Acts 10:44-46 While Peter was still speaking these words, the Holy Spirit came on all who heard the message. [45] The circumcised believers who had come with Peter were astonished that the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out even on the Gentiles. [46] For they heard them speaking in tongues and praising God. •• Again, what was unique here? — the speaking in tongues. •• What was not unique here? — the praising of God, which is common throughout the Old and New Testaments. Acts 19:6 When Paul placed his hands on them, the Holy Spirit came on them, and they spoke in tongues and prophesied. •• Once more, what was unique here? — the speaking in tongues. •• What was not unique here? — the prophesying, which is commonly seen in both Testaments. The Scriptural conclusion? The baptism with the Holy Spirit (as we have seen in Acts 2, 10, and 19) is a unique New Testament experience. And it has a unique initial evidence — speaking in tongues! The sound of a rushing, mighty wind (Acts 2:2) is not an evidence, nor is it “the evidence”. It occurred on only one of the New Testament instances of the baptism in the Holy Spirit. And it had occurred in the Old Testament (e.g., 1 Kings 19:11), where it was clearly not the evidence of the baptism with the Spirit. Fire, or tongues of fire (Acts 2:3), is not an evidence, nor is it “the evidence” of the Holy Ghost baptism. It also occurred in only one of the New Testament cases. And fire was a fairly common occurrence in the Old Testament when God revealed Himself, and again clearly not in the context of the Holy Spirit baptism. Praising God (Acts 10:46) is universal throughout Scripture. So it cannot be singled out as an evidence that one is Spirit-filled. Many non-Spirit-filled people praised God in the Old Testament. Prophecy (Acts 19:6) is likewise common in the Old Testament among those not baptized in the Holy Spirit in the abiding, Acts 2, Pentecostal way. So it too cannot be put forth as a unique evidence that one has received the baptism in the Spirit. What conclusions can be drawn from the Scriptures we have examined? • Neither wind nor fire are necessary evidences of the baptism with the Holy Spirit. • And if they do occur, as they already had in the Old Testament, they do not therefore uniquely certify that the person has received the Holy Spirit baptism. • Neither praise nor prophecy is a necessary evidence. They may indeed occur, but many Old Testament persons did one or both, but were not baptized in the Spirit. • Other things — like love, or renewed zeal — may indeed flow from the baptism with the Holy Spirit. But they also characterize many Old Testament saints without this Pentecostal, spiritual filling. • Only SPEAKING IN TONGUES (as in Acts 2, Acts 10, and Acts 19) is the UNIQUE EVIDENCE of the UNIQUE NEW TESTAMENT experience called the BAPTISM with the HOLY SPIRIT. A more extensive treatment of this topic may be found at our bible study entitled “Why Speak in Tongues?” A related sermon is entitled Evidences of the Spirit-Filled Life. Why Speak in Tongues? What Is Pray in Tongues? Praying in Tongues Gives us Understanding of God’s Mysteries “For he who speaks in a tongue does not speak to men but to God, for no one understands Him; however, in the spirit he speaks mysteries” (1 Cor. 14:2, NKJV). God is mysterious, yes, but the Spirit who knows everything about the mysterious, expansive, glorious God is the same Spirit who lives inside of us! And furthermore, He wants to reveal mysteries to us about God, His will, your life and the circumstances you are facing. How do we access this revelation? Communion with the Holy Spirit on His level—in His language. Remember, Paul defines Holy Spirit as the One who “searches out everything and shows us God’s deep secrets” (1 Cor. 2:10, NLT). As you pray in the Spirit, you will discover things that were previously mysterious and unknown will start coming into greater focus and clarity. Praying in Tongues Grants You Access to Other Revelatory Gifts of the Holy Spirit “For to one is given the word of wisdom through the Spirit, to another the word of knowledge through the same Spirit … to another prophecy, to another discerning of spirits, to another (DIFFERENT) different kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues” (1 Cor. 12: 8, 10, NKJV). Praying in tongues actually unlocks other revelatory gifts of the Holy Spirit in your life, namely the word of wisdom, word of knowledge, prophecy and discerning of spirits. Remember, you are not praying on a natural dimension, but rather engaging on a purely spiritual one. Don’t be surprised if, while praying in tongues, the Holy Spirit gives you supernatural insight about something, leads you to pray for people and unlocks clarity over people, situations and even regions, enabling you to effectively pray for and break off the spiritual strongholds that are influencing them. This happens all the time in Church of God, Cleveland, TN churches. But We are all praying at the say time. Holy Spirit knows what he is doing He is the one giving the ability to speak/ pray in tongues. He is NOT confused. When we have 6,000 people in one room at one time at South Carolina Camp meting at least 4,000 people are praying at one time. Brother Link Hudson are you going to run around the room of 6,000 people while the Holy Spirit is moving and tell them to STOP!!! Because this does NOT fit into your little box that you are trying to create for Holy Spirit? Yes, you are creating this BOX Brother Link Hudson the Bible is NOT teaching what you are teaching. Paul was talking to a group of people who were already having problems with poor sportsmanship they were constancy arguing about who was better at doing what. This is where we hear Paul say I speak in tongues more than any of you. See Almost any commentary to find out that the 1 Coronation church had problems. This is a letter to set things in order. This case study is NOT telling us that me must never be ashamed of tongues and never speak in tongues for fear that someone may also speak. Chapters 12 through 14 focus on the subject of spiritual gifts. In chapter 12, Paul teaches that every we are given at least one spiritual gift. These gifts are sovereignly bestowed, as He wills (not by our manipulation, or in accordance with our fleshly desires). No one possesses all of the spiritual gifts, and no gift is possessed by all. These gifts give every Christian a unique and vital role to play as a member of the body of Christ. Each gift is designed to contribute to the health and growth of the body, so that whenever anyone fails to exercise their gift(s) the whole body suffers. In the Corinthian church, certain gifts were valued above others. In particular, the gift of tongues seems to have been viewed as the greatest gift, so that all were striving to get it, and those who did not have it felt inferior and useless to the body. In some of our churches today people have this wrong understanding of who Holy Spirit is and why He speaks through us. This is what these conversations are so important. Paul turns the tables on those who sought to elevate the gift of tongues above all others by declaring that it was the lesser gifts that were given “more honor” to compensate for their apparent insignificance. In so doing, Paul turned their spiritual scale of values upside-down. It is the less visible gifts that are the most valuable, just as it is the invisible organs of our bodies (kidneys, liver, heart, brain) that are most valuable to us. In chapter 13, Paul turns to the essential ingredient of love. It is love that makes our gifts and service beneficial to others. Gifts that are not exercised in love are not only useless, but annoying (“a clanging cymbal” – 13:1). Love causes us to seek to employ our spiritual gifts for the edification of others, rather than for the exaltation of self. Chapter 14 returns to the subject of spiritual gifts and their use in the church meeting. Paul shows that the gift of prophecy is superior to the gift of tongues, unless tongues are interpreted. Unless tongues are interpreted, their value is minimal to the speaker personally, or to the church. If tongues are uninterested, then those who hear cannot understand what was said, and thus they cannot be edified. Only the speaker is edified, and if he or she cannot interpret what was said, they gain little as well. Paul now lays down the guiding principle for the exercise of spiritual gifts in the gathering of the church, the principle of edification: 12 It is the same with you. Since you are eager for manifestations of the Spirit, seek to abound in order to strengthen [edify] the church. . . . 26 What should you do then, brothers and sisters? When you come together, each one has a song, has a lesson, has a revelation, has a tongue, has an interpretation. Let all these things be done for the strengthening [edification] of the church (1 Corinthians 14;12, 26; see also Ephesians 4:29). There is another guiding principle set down in 1 Corinthians 14: And do everything in a decent and orderly manner (1 Corinthians 14:40; see also 14:33). An orderly meeting is one in which there is a balance of participation and a decorum that is maintained. There is to be no interrupting or clamoring for the podium. There is not to be an imbalance in the kinds of participation (two or no more than three in any category of speaking). There is to be silence when the saints will not be edified (as in the speaking of tongues without an interpreter, or when the same gift has been repeatedly exercised). The women are to remain silent in the church meeting. They are not to exercise headship, and thus they are not to “take the floor” to speak or to lead. They are to remain quiet. And if any would quibble with these restrictions, Paul wants his readers to know that this is his consistent teaching and practice: 17 For this reason, I have sent Timothy to you, who is my dear and faithful son in the Lord. He will remind you of my ways in Christ, as I teach them everywhere in every church. 18 Some have become puffed up, as if I were not coming to you (1 Corinthians 4:17-18). Notice there it is again in V. 18 “some have become puffed up.” These people are argent and prideful about their spiritual gifts. This is NOT Paul telling us we are NOT allowed to let people hear us. This is Paul telling us NOT to be Puffed up.

Also the grate Apostle is telling us that we are allowed to pray in tongues in church (gathering of associated believers).

PAUL’S PERMISSION TO PRAY IN TOUNGES 1 Cor 14:28

New Living Translation But if no one is present who can interpret, they must be silent in your church meeting and speak in tongues to God privately.

English Standard Version But if there is no one to interpret, let each of them keep silent in church and speak to himself and to God.

Berean Study Bible But if there is no interpreter, he should remain silent in the church and speak only to himself and God.

Berean Literal Bible But if there is no interpreter, let him be silent in the church, and let him speak to himself and to God.

New American Standard Bible but if there is no interpreter, he must keep silent in the church; and let him speak to himself and to God.

King James Bible But if there be no interpreter, let him keep silence in the church; and let him speak to himself, and to God.

Holman Christian Standard Bible But if there is no interpreter, that person should keep silent in the church and speak to himself and to God.

International Standard Version If an interpreter is not present, the speaker should remain silent in the church and speak to himself and God.

NET Bible But if there is no interpreter, he should be silent in the church. Let him speak to himself and to God.

Aramaic Bible in Plain English And if there is no translator, let him who speaks in a language be silent in the church and let him speak to himself and to God.

GOD’S WORD® Translation But if an interpreter isn’t present, those people should remain silent in church. They should only speak to themselves and to God.

New American Standard 1977 but if there is no interpreter, let him keep silent in the church; and let him speak to himself and to God.

Jubilee Bible 2000 But if there is no interpreter, let him keep silence in the congregation {Gr. ekklesia – called out ones}, and let him speak to himself and to God.

King James 2000 Bible But if there be no interpreter, let him keep silence in the church; and let him speak to himself, and to God.

American King James Version But if there be no interpreter, let him keep silence in the church; and let him speak to himself, and to God.

American Standard Version but if there be no interpreter, let him keep silence in the church; and let him speak to himself, and to God.

Douay-Rheims Bible But if there be no interpreter, let him hold his peace in the church, and speak to himself and to God.

Darby Bible Translation but if there be no interpreter, let him be silent in [the] assembly, and let him speak to himself and to God.

English Revised Version but if there be no interpreter, let him keep silence in the church; and let him speak to himself, and to God.

Webster’s Bible Translation But if there is no interpreter, let him keep silence in the church; and let him speak to himself, and to God.

Weymouth New Testament or if there is no interpreter, let the man with the gift be silent in the Church, speaking to himself and to God.

World English Bible But if there is no interpreter, let him keep silent in the assembly, and let him speak to himself, and to God.

Young’s Literal Translation and if there may be no interpreter, let him be silent in an assembly, and to himself let him speak, and to God. Parallel Commentaries Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary

14:26-33 Religious exercises in public assemblies should have this view; Let all be done to edifying. As to the speaking in an unknown tongue, if another were present who could interpret, two miraculous gifts might be exercised at once, and thereby the church be edified, and the faith of the hearers confirmed at the same time. As to prophesying, two or three only should speak at one meeting, and this one after the other, not all at once. The man who is inspired by the Spirit of God will observe order and decency in delivering his revelations. God never teaches men to neglect their duties, or to act in any way unbecoming their age or station.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 28. – Let him keep silence. The “him” refers to the glossolalist, not to the interpreter. To himself. In his private devotions (as St. Paul himself seems to have done); not in the public assembly.

Gill’s Exposition of the Entire Bible

But if there be no interpreter,…. None that has the gift of interpretation of divers tongues, and he that speaks with them has not that, which was sometimes the case:

let him keep silence in the church; let him not make use of his gift publicly before the whole congregation, since without an interpreter it will be entirely useless:

and let him speak to himself, and to God; he may make use of his gift to his own edification, and to the glory of God, by speaking with a low voice, or in his heart, which he himself may be conscious of, and God the searcher of hearts, and that knows all languages, fully understands; and so may be edified himself, and God may be glorified by him; whereas, if he was to use it openly and publicly, it would not only be unprofitable, but an hinderance to others: or he might retire to his own house, and there exercise it by himself, and in the presence of God, when it might be of some use and advantage to himself, but would be highly improper to bring it into the church, or public congregation; for instead of assisting, it would but dampen their devotion, and therefore it was very reasonable he should be silent there. Historically “Speaking in tongues”! Just utter that phrase among Christians, and you elicit a wide variety of reactions, sometimes very strong reactions. Bible studies by the thousands have been written for it … and against it. Many ask a legitimate question: “Is speaking in tongues for today?”

Historically, speaking in a tongue (glossolalia) by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit was common among Christians in the first-century Church, then seemed to fade out gradually in succeeding centuries. In the very early twentieth century there came a resurgence of this biblical practice, North Carolina (For this earth known as the grates denomination on this earth Church of God, Cleaved, TN) then sometime latter- most notably in Topeka, Kansas, and in revival meetings on Azusa Street in Los Angeles. From those and other places of spiritual renewal came many of today’s leading Pentecostal denominations. Subsequent movements in which speaking in tongues was a prominent feature included the Latter Rain revival, the mid-20th-century healing ministries, the Full Gospel Businessmen’s Fellowship, and the Charismatic Renewal. In this latter movement especially, the biblical doctrine of the baptism with the Holy Spirit, with the initial evidence of speaking in tongues, spread broadly into both the Roman Catholic Church and many Protestant denominations. By the early 21st century, speaking in tongues (the theological term is glossolalia) — that is, languages unknown to the speaker, given by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit — had become broadly if not universally accepted within worldwide Christianity. Many portions of the worldwide Church today have once again come to embrace one of the historical ancient landmarks of the Church that Jesus created.

But historical and anecdotal testimonies, as interesting as they may be, are still secondary. The Bible must be the source of primary importance in establishing the present-day validity of speaking in tongues. So to that treasure trove, the Bible, we will now turn to answer the question: “Why should we speak in tongues?”

Mark 16:15-17 He [Jesus] said to them, “Go into all the world and preach the good news to all creation. Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved, but whoever does not believe will be condemned. And these signs will accompany those who believe: In my name they will drive out demons; they will speak in new tongues.

The verses above are an excerpt of Mark’s account of Jesus’ Great Commission. It was Jesus Himself who initiated the subject of speaking in tongues in the New Testament. He said that it would be a “sign” that would accompany believers as they went into all the world and preached the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

• So our first reply to the question “Why speak in tongues?” is that Jesus endorsed the practice. In fact, Jesus said that speaking in tongues is one of the signs that “will accompany those who believe.”

Praying in Tongues Opens Up God’s Word in a New, Living Way as we Read It “However, when He, the Spirit of truth, has come, He will guide you into all truth; for He will not speak on His own authority, but whatever He hears He will speak” (John 16:13).

For some modern believers, reading the Bible can feel like a life-draining experience. It’s not just history. It is not a mere record of facts. Scripture isn’t just stories. The same Holy Spirit who inspired the writing and assembly of the Holy Scriptures lives inside of you. He wants to guide you through the Bible, make the words jump off the page, give you understanding on confusing matters, empower you to apply God’s Word to your everyday life, share prophetic promises with you and help you discover your role in God’s unfolding story.

When Praying in Tongues, You Are Speaking Directly to God “For he who speaks in a tongue does not speak to men but to God” (1 Cor. 14:2).

As you pray in tongues, you have a direct line to the creator of the universe. Sometimes while praying in our native languages, we have the tendency to veer off and get distracted. We may start complaining. We may start going through the routine laundry list of prayer requests—and by the time we are finished reading them off to God, we feel more burdened than refreshed (because we actively thought of every single one of those circumstances as we listed them off in prayer). Tongues keeps us talking directly to God, praying in agreement with His perfect will (Rom. 8:26-28).

Praying in Tongues Empowers You to Engage Spiritual Warfare From the Position of Victory

“Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit” (Eph. 6:18). Praying in tongues is not some magic formula that guarantees us some free and easy lifestyle of health, wealth, prosperity and all of those fixings. Jesus assured us that in this life, we will experience tribulation (John 16:33). In the same passage, the same Jesus declared that He has overcome the world. Victory has already been secured at Calvary. In times of trial and assault, it is easy for us to become weary in the place of prayer, often not knowing what or how to pray. Praise God for the Holy Spirit! Paul reminds us “for we do not know what we should pray for as we ought, but the Spirit Himself makes intercession for us” (Rom. 8:26). When in the heat of spiritual combat, it is easy to start praying prayers that agree with the size of the attack, emphasizing the problem rather than focusing on the size of the blood-bought victory that Jesus purchased at the cross. Praying in tongues empowers you to agree with God’s victorious battle plan for your life and your circumstances, no matter what is going on around you. It does not deny reality; it simply positions you to agree with the higher truth of Scripture: Victory has been purchased, and it is yours through Jesus Christ.

Tongues Reveals the Wisdom of God Again, praying in tongues does not make you a better Christian. It does not instantly elevate you into spiritual superstardom. There are many believers who speak in tongues but live like the devil. However, tongues is a relevant and available gift to believers today. Why tongues—something that seems so foolish, uneducated and ungraspable to our natural human minds? Keep in mind that you are dealing with the King of the universe who arrived on Planet Earth in a manger surrounded by farm animals. He is the holy God who died the death of a criminal on a Roman cross to make atonement for the sins of the world. Our God is the One who deals in wisdom that is so infinitely superior to what our natural minds can comfortably wrap around that, at first glance, such methods appear downright foolish. Birthing His church with wind, fire and speaking in tongues would be another such demonstration of God’s otherworldly wisdom. But consider the words of the apostle Paul”

“But God has chosen the foolish things of the world to put to shame the wise, and God has chosen the weak things of the world to put to shame the things which are mighty; and the base things of the world and the things which are despised God has chosen, and the things which are not, to bring to nothing the things that are, that no flesh should glory in His presence” (1 Cor. 1:27-29).

Just because our minds cannot understand the whys of God’s ways, that does not give us permission to ignore them. Tongues is surely a mystery, but at the same time it is a powerful gift that will not only enrich your personal prayer life but will bring you into deeper intimacy and communion with the Holy Spirit.

At this point, it will be helpful to examine several portions of Scripture in the book of Acts (see the three quotes below) that speak of being “baptized with” or “filled with” the Holy Spirit. As we will see, on all three occasions believers who were said to be filled/baptized with the Spirit immediately spoke in tongues. This is the biblical pattern. When believers are baptized with the Holy Spirit, they begin to speak in tongues.

Acts 1:4-5; 2:1-4, KJV And, being assembled together with them, commanded them that they should not depart from Jerusalem, but wait for the promise of the Father, which, saith he, ye have heard of me. For John truly baptized with water; but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost not many days hence…. [2:1] And when the day of Pentecost was fully come, they were all with one accord in one place. And suddenly there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting. And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them. And they were all filled with the Holy Ghost, and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance.

This was the first New Testament day of Pentecost after Jesus’ resurrection. He had prophesied to His followers that they would be “baptized with the Holy Ghost” (1:5). This occurred some few days later on “the day of Pentecost” (2:1) when it is said that “they were all filled with the Holy Ghost” (2:4) and manifested this by the evidence of speaking in tongues (2:4). As a point of interest, because this happened on “the day of Pentecost” (2:1), those who have received this baptism with the Spirit, with the evidence of speaking in tongues, have often in modern times been called “Pentecostals”.

Compare verses 1:5 and 2:4. We see that the Bible uses the terms “baptized with the Holy Ghost” and “filled with the Holy Ghost” as synonyms for the same biblical experience. And the discernible evidence of that baptism with the Holy Spirit was their speaking in tongues. This will be seen again in Acts, chapters 10 and 19 (below).

But before looking at Acts 10, let’s take one more look at Acts 1:5 (KJV) — “John truly baptized with water; but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost not many days hence.” Jesus made a clear distinction between water baptism and baptism with the Holy Spirit. They are not one and the same. Now on to Acts, chapter 10.

Acts 10:44-47 While Peter was still speaking these words, the Holy Spirit came on all who heard the message. The circumcised believers who had come with Peter were astonished that the gift of the Holy Spirit had been poured out even on the Gentiles. For they heard them speaking in tongues and praising God. Then Peter said, “Can anyone keep these people from being baptized with water? They have received the Holy Spirit just as we have.”

Some Gentiles had assembled in Cornelius’s house to hear Peter preach. While Peter was still speaking, the listeners received the Holy Spirit and began to speak in tongues. And how did Peter and his companions know that they had received “the gift of the Holy Spirit”? The answer is in verse 46: “FOR they heard them speaking in tongues.” Again, as in Acts 2, the evidence of their having received the gift of the Holy Spirit was their speaking in tongues.

In Act 1 and 2 we saw the first group in Jerusalem being “baptized with…filled with the Holy Spirit.” Peter certified that these Gentiles in Acts 10 had received the identical experience — “They have received the Holy Spirit just as we have.” So Acts 2, the first New Testament day of Pentecost, was not a one-time occurrence. To the contrary, Peter asserts that these Gentiles had received the identical gift of the Holy Spirit. Peter recounts this again in Acts 11:15-17 — “As I began to speak, the Holy Spirit came on them as he had come on us at the beginning. Then I remembered what the Lord had said: ‘John baptized with water, but you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit.’ So if God gave them the same gift as he gave us, who believed in the Lord Jesus Christ, who was I to think that I could oppose God?” (underlinings mine) The Gentiles in Acts 10 received the “same gift,” the same baptism with the Holy Spirit, that the 120 had received in Jerusalem in Acts. And in both instances they manifested the identical evidence — they immediately spoke in tongues.

And notice once more (vss. 10:47-48) that Peter made a clear distinction between water baptism and their having received the Holy Spirit. Acts 19:1-6 While Apollos was at Corinth, Paul took the road through the interior and arrived at Ephesus. There he found some disciples and asked them, “Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?” They answered, “No, we have not even heard that there is a Holy Spirit.” So Paul asked, “Then what baptism did you receive?” “John’s baptism,” they replied. Paul said, “John’s baptism was a baptism of repentance. He told the people to believe in the one coming after him, that is, in Jesus.” On hearing this, they were baptized into the name of the Lord Jesus. When Paul placed his hands on them, the Holy Spirit came on them, and they spoke in tongues and prophesied.

Here is a third clear instance in the book of Acts — along with Acts 2 and Acts 10 just studied above — where believers received the baptism with the Spirit and spoke in tongues. So we have a consistent bible pattern — believers who are baptized with/filled with the Holy Spirit will immediately speak in tongues.

• These three clear illustrations from Acts 2, 10, and 19 certify that speaking in tongues is the Scriptural evidence of the baptism with the Holy Spirit.

Acts 19:1-6 (quoted just above) brings us another important insight. Notice that the apostle Paul considered these believers to be baptized disciples. Paul’s question establishes the fact that it is perfectly appropriate to ask a water-baptized Christian, “Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?” There is a clear difference between being “born of the Spirit” (John 3:5) and “baptized with the Holy Spirit.” They are entirely different Greek words. The context — they spoke in tongues in verse 6 — shows that Paul’s question “Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?” was asked in the sense of “Have you water-baptized disciples been baptized with the Holy Spirit yet?”

In sum, our Scripture texts in Acts 2, 10, and 19 give us a consistent pattern: • There is a baptism in water, and there is a distinct baptism in the Holy Spirit. • Those who receive the baptism with the Holy Spirit give evidence to this by speaking in tongues. Acts 2:4 All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them. KJV: …as the Spirit gave them utterance. • Why speak in tongues? — It gives us an ever-present opportunity to submit to the leading, the direction, the enablement of the Holy Spirit. We do the speaking, but the Holy Spirit actually enables us to do so by prompting us with the words to speak in a language not known to us. This humble, willing submission of our vocal organs to the Holy Spirit’s leading will stand us in good stead as we open ourselves to other facets of the Holy Spirit’s direction and guidance.

Acts 11:15-18, KJV And as I began to speak, the Holy Ghost fell on them, as on us at the beginning. Then remembered I the word of the Lord, how that he said, John indeed baptized with water; but ye shall be baptized with the Holy Ghost. Forasmuch then as God gave them the like gift as he did unto us, who believed on the Lord Jesus Christ; what was I, that I could withstand God? When they heard these things, they held their peace, and glorified God, saying, Then hath God also to the Gentiles granted repentance unto life.

• Why speak in tongues? — It demonstrates the reality of God in the life of the one speaking in tongues. At this early stage of the New Testament Church, the original Jewish Christians in Jerusalem were still doubtful that the Gospel should even be preached to the Gentiles! Peter corrected their error by telling the account of his preaching to the Gentiles at Cornelius’s house, and of those Gentiles receiving the Holy Spirit and speaking in tongues. This dramatic event convinced the skeptics in Jerusalem, and they acknowledged that God had indeed “granted repentance unto life” (18) to the Gentiles. The fact that the Gentiles spoke with tongues was sufficient evidence for the Jewish Christians to discard centuries of anti-Gentile sentiment and to embrace them as fellow Christians. Acts 19:2a, 6 [Paul] asked them, “Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?” … [6] When Paul placed his hands on them, the Holy Spirit came on them, and they spoke in tongues and prophesied. • The baptism with the Holy Spirit opens the door to other spiritual gifts from the Holy Spirit — here, “they…prophesied.” Jesus Himself was conceived by the Holy Spirit (Matthew 1:20). But at about age 30 at River Jordan, Jesus was anointed and empowered by the Holy Spirit (John 1:32-33 with Acts 10:38). Only after this distinct experience of the Spirit did Jesus do his first miracle at the wedding feast of Cana (John 2:11).

It is the Holy Spirit anointing, which comes in the baptism with the Spirit, that tends to release in the recipients a greater flow in the gifts of the Spirit. 1 Corinthians 12:7, 10 Now to each one the manifestation of the Spirit is given for the common good… [10] to another miraculous powers, to another prophecy, to another distinguishing between spirits, to another speaking in different kinds of tongues, and to still another the interpretation of tongues.

• The companion gifts of the Spirit — tongues and interpretation of tongues — are manifested in church services “for the [church’s] common good.” We will look at the subject of tongues in church services in greater depth in chapter 14 of this epistle. 1 Corinthians 14:2 For anyone who speaks in a tongue does not speak to men but to God. Indeed, no one understands him; he utters mysteries with his spirit.

There is an ability to speak in tongues (glossolalia) that is given to all who receive the baptism with the Holy Spirit, as shown in our earlier discussions of Acts chapters 2, 10, and 19. 1 Corinthians 14:2 gives us an additional reason why Spirit-baptized believers should speak in tongues — “Anyone who speaks in a tongue … speak[s] … to God.” • That is, speaking in tongues is a God-given way for believers to “speak to God.” As such, it is a valuable asset in our prayer life, along with speaking to God in our own native language (which is English for me). 1 Corinthians 14:2, 14-15a For anyone who speaks in a tongue … utters mysteries with his spirit [KJV: ‘in the spirit’]…. [14] For if I pray in a tongue, my spirit prays, but my mind is unfruitful. So what shall I do? I will pray with my spirit, but I will also pray with my mind. • Praying in tongues is praying “in” or “with the spirit.” There is a praying in the known language, comprehended by our minds. And there is also a “praying in the spirit,” inspired by the Holy Spirit and not understood by our minds. 1 Corinthians 14:4 He who speaks in a tongue edifies himself, but he who prophesies edifies the church. • Why speak in tongues? — The one speaking in tongues is edified, built up. Some have wrongly read this as Paul minimizing the importance of tongues. But Paul is making two positive comments here: (1) speaking in tongues edifies the individual, and (2) prophecy spoken in the church edifies the church. It is a good thing for both individuals and the church to be edified.

1 Corinthians 14:5a, 39 I would like every one of you to speak in tongues…. [39] Therefore, my brothers, be eager to prophesy, and do not forbid speaking in tongues. • Why speak in tongues? — The great apostle Paul spoke very favorably of the practice: “I would like every one of you to speak in tongues.” Even further, Paul gave an admonition that, sadly, is disobeyed in some churches of our day: “Do not forbid speaking in tongues.” Yet many pastors in our day do exactly this, telling their congregations that tongues are not for them or not for this day and age. 1 Corinthians 14:5, 12-13 I would like every one of you to speak in tongues, but I would rather have you prophesy. He who prophesies is greater than one who speaks in tongues, unless he interprets, so that the church may be edified…. [12] So it is with you. Since you are eager to have spiritual gifts, try to excel in gifts that build up the church. For this reason anyone who speaks in a tongue should pray that he may interpret what he says.

• Why speak in tongues? — The spiritual gift of tongues (1 Corinthians 12:10), when coupled with the companion spiritual gift of interpretation of tongues (1 Corinthians 12:10), edifies and builds up the church. On many occasions and in various congregations I have heard someone bring forth a message in tongues in church. This was followed by the gift of interpretation. And the net result in each case was that the people present were edified and built up.

In the Scripture just above, the apostle Paul declares that “He who prophesies is greater than one who speaks in tongues, unless he interprets.” So if there is a tongue with interpretation, Paul is saying that the value is roughly equivalent to prophecy.

1 Corinthians 14:14-15, KJV For if I pray in an unknown tongue, my spirit prayeth, but my understanding is unfruitful. What is it then? I will pray with the spirit, and I will pray with the understanding also: I will sing with the spirit, and I will sing with the understanding also.

• Why speak in tongues? — It helps us to have a balanced prayer life and a balanced worship experience. Paul endorses both “pray[ing] with the spirit and … pray[ing] with the understanding.” Interestingly, in this direct context of tongues, the apostle also encourages singing with both the spirit and the understanding. 1 Corinthians 14:16-17 If you are praising God with your spirit, how can one who finds himself among those who do not understand say “Amen” to your thanksgiving, since he does not know what you are saying? You may be giving thanks well enough, but the other man is not edified. • Why speak in tongues? — When speaking in tongues, “you may be giving thanks well.” As we have seen (Acts 2:4), tongues are a language inspired by the Holy Spirit. The speaker does not know the content of what is being spoken. But God does! And the Spirit of God can inspire a wide variety of content in the tongue spoken — including “giving thanks well.” 1 Corinthians 14:18 I thank God that I speak in tongues more than all of you. • Why speak in tongues? — It was apostolic practice. Paul spoke in tongues. On the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:1-4), the original apostles of Jesus (less Judas, Acts 1:13-15) were part of the group that received the first outpouring of the Spirit, with the immediate evidence of speaking in tongues. Paul thanked God for the God-given ability to speak in tongues. And he desired the same experience for all believers — (14:5) “I would like every one of you to speak in tongues.”

1 Corinthians 14:26 What then shall we say, brothers? When you come together, everyone has a hymn, or a word of instruction, a revelation, a tongue or an interpretation. All of these must be done for the strengthening of the church.

• Why speak in tongues? — Tongues with interpretation are an appropriate part of an edifying New Testament church service. Verse 26 lists the most important parts of a church service — praise/worship (“a hymn”), the ministry of the word (“a word of instruction”), and the gifts of the Spirit (“a revelation, a tongue or an interpretation”). And Paul declares that “all of these must be done for the strengthening of the church.” Sadly, in our day the typical church accepts some of these — praise/worship and the ministry of the word — and rejects the various gifts of the Spirit, including tongues and interpretation. If we want “strengthened” churches, we will include the word, worship, and gifts of the Spirit in our church services.

In conclusion, it will be informative to see the different expressions that the Bible uses for tongues. Remember that, although the language may or may not be understood by listeners, in all instances recorded in Scripture, the tongue being spoken was supernaturally given to the speaker by the Holy Spirit and was not understood by the one speaking. Listed below are a variety of bible terms for the practice of glossolalia, or speaking in tongues: • “new tongues” (Mark 16:17) • “other tongues” (Acts 2:4) • “different kinds of tongues” (1 Corinthians 12:10, 28) • “diversities of tongues” (1 Corinthians 12:28, KJV) • “tongues of men and of angels” (1 Corinthians 13:1), that is, human languages and angelic, heavenly languages • “an unknown tongue … no man understandeth” (1 Corinthians 14:2, KJV) • Then we see other spiritual phenomenon which leads us to believe that writer believes the first century audience saw and heard speaking in tongues: To summarize, why then should we encourage speaking in tongues today, in the 21st century? • Jesus said that believers would (Mark 16:17). • Tongues certify and give evidence that the person is baptized with the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:5; 2:1-4; 10:44-46; 11:15-17; 19:1-6). • Speaking in tongues is a good opportunity to submit to the Holy Spirit’s leading (Acts 2:4). • Tongues demonstrate the reality of God in the speaker’s life (Acts 11:15-18). • The baptism with the Holy Spirit, evidenced by speaking in tongues, opens the door to other gifts of the Spirit (Acts 19:2,6). • Tongues with interpretation are “for the [church’s] common good” (1 Corinthians 12:7, 10). • Speaking in tongues is speaking to God (1 Corinthians 14:2a). • Praying in tongues is praying “in” or “with the Spirit” (1 Corinthians 14:2, 14-15). • The speaker in tongues is edified (1 Corinthians 14:4). • The apostle Paul expressly approved of tongues (1 Corinthians 14:5a, 39). • A tongue followed by an interpretation edifies the church (1 Corinthians 14:5, 12-13). • Tongues allow us a balanced prayer and worship life, both with the spirit and with the understanding (1 Corinthians 14:14-15). • When speaking in tongues, you may be giving thanks well to God (1 Corinthians 14:16-17). • Speaking in tongues was apostolic practice (1 Corinthians 14:18 and at Pentecost). • Tongues with interpretation are an appropriate, strengthening part of an edifying church service (1 Corinthians 14:26). From the bottom of my heart, I commend to you the words of the apostle Paul in 1 Corinthians 14:5: “I would like every one of you to speak in tongues.” Please see our related bible study on tongues (glossolalia) as the initial evidence of the baptism with the Holy Spirit as well as our sermon on Evidences of the Spirit-Filled Life. Evidences of the Spirit-Filled Life

Article Summary: Many bible teachings and sermons assert that “the evidence” of the baptism with the Holy Spirit, in every instance, is speaking in tongues. This is correct. However, along with the every-time evidence of tongues, there are numerous other results and evidences of the Spirit-filled life.
Acts 1:4-5; 2:1-4 … [5] For John baptized with water, but in a few days you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit… [2:4] All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them.
• (1) Speaking in tongues – always! This is universally “the initial evidence” that a believer has been baptized with the Holy Spirit. The identical evidence of tongues occurred also in Acts 10:44-46 and Acts 19:1-6 when believers were filled with the Holy Spirit.
• But there are other results and evidences of the Spirit-filled life in addition to speaking in tongues. A Spirit-filled, tongues-speaking Christian should not stop at the experience of speaking in tongues. The Holy Spirit will also bring other spiritual manifestations into the daily expression of the Spirit-filled life.
• (2) “As the Spirit enabled them … [KJV] gave them utterance” — to the Spirit-filled Christian there comes an enabling by the Spirit to do things not possible in the natural — for example, as here, the speaking of a language one has not learned.
Acts 1:8 But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.
• (3) The Spirit-filled believer will “receive power” — in context via the baptism [vs. 5], not the new birth, of the Holy Spirit. Holy Ghost power for ministry comes with the mighty baptism with the Holy Spirit.
• (4) “be [His] witnesses” — A Spirit-filled Christian grows in the ability to be an effective witness (for example, Peter’s dynamic, soul-winning sermon on the Day of Pentecost [Acts 2]!).
Acts 2:14 Then Peter stood up with the Eleven, raised his voice and addressed the crowd: “Fellow Jews and all of you who live in Jerusalem, let me explain this to you; listen carefully to what I say.”
• (5) Fear is replaced by courage. Before Pentecost, Peter denied Christ three times. After Pentecost and his personal experience of the Pentecostal infilling of the Spirit, Peter preached boldly in Jerusalem.
Acts 2:16-17 No, this is what was spoken by the prophet Joel: “In the last days, God says, I will pour out my Spirit on all people. Your sons and daughters will prophesy your young men will see visions, your old men will dream dreams.”
• (6) Prophecy, visions, dreams, even among the young people, begin to be experienced by those living the Spirit-filled life.
Acts 2:36 “Therefore let all Israel be assured of this: God has made this Jesus, whom you crucified, both Lord and Christ.”
• (7) Hear insights from God. For example, the newly Spirit-baptized Peter here voices the first mention in the bible of the full name of the Lord … Jesus … Christ.
• I can picture the surprised bible teachers and students reaching right now for their concordances. Please do; there you will find that never in the four Gospels is the full name — “Lord Jesus Christ” in any order of those three words — revealed. It is not disclosed until its revelation to Spirit-filled Peter in Acts 2:36!
• A delightful result of the Spirit-filled life is an enhanced ability to sense and hear the voice of the Holy Spirit.
Acts 2:41 Those who accepted his message were baptized, and about three thousand were added to their number that day.
• (8) Spirit-filled believers begin to see greater fruit in their ministries. Prior to Pentecost, the apostles had never borne fruit of this magnitude. Then here, on the very day of their Pentecostal baptism, Peter preached a sermon that won 3,000 converts to the Lord and to water baptism.
Acts 2:43 …and many wonders and miraculous signs were done by the apostles.
• (9) Some Spirit-filled believers — not necessarily all — begin to be used in what have been called the “power gifts”.
Acts 3:6-7 Then Peter said, “Silver or gold I do not have, but what I have I give you. In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, walk.” [7] …and instantly the man’s feet and ankles became strong.
• (10) To some are given gifts of healing.
Acts 3:16; 4:10, 12 “By faith in the name of Jesus, this man whom you see and know was made strong. It is Jesus’ name and the faith that comes through him that has given this complete healing to him, as you can all see…. [4:10] …it is by the name of Jesus Christ… [12] Salvation is found in no one else…”
• (11) The baptism with the Holy Spirit makes you Christ-centered, not Holy-Spirit-centered. As Paul said, “We preach Christ!” One of the Holy Spirit’s works is to make us effective in pointing people to Jesus Christ.
Acts 4:29-31 Now, Lord, consider their threats and enable your servants to speak your word with great boldness… [31b] And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and spoke the word of God boldly.
• (12) One result of being filled with the Holy Spirit is a divine enabling to speak the Word of God boldly.

John Kissinger [10/23/2015 10:20 AM]
https://docs.google.com/viewerng/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fpneumareview.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2013%2F12%2FNTGlossolalia.pdf

8 Comments

  • Reply December 7, 2019

    Varnel Watson

    so this guy here is NOT a phd and certainly not in theology He may have done some masters – mdiv or ma but who knows The observations presented are copy paste from an online BIBLE study

    Can anyone confirm this is even a Pentecostal view? Steve Phifer Daniel J Hesse Peter Vandever J.D. King Paul L. King

    • Peter Vandever
      Reply December 7, 2019

      Peter Vandever

      Troy Day it is not coming up. What did he say?

    • Reply December 7, 2019

      Varnel Watson

      Peter Vandever Understand Holy Spirit And Speaking in Tongues Timothy R. Carter, Ph.D I have incorporated an online article into this Bible study to strengthen the readers’ understanding without having the reader jump around: 5 WAYS THAT PRAYS IN TONGUES WILLS CHANGE YOUR LIFE FORGVER, Charismanews.com by: Larry Sparks Web add no longer available Article: The Origins of the Church at Corinth Robert L. (Bob)Deffinbaugh graduated from Dallas https://bible.org/users/bob-deffinbaugh I have also used the commentary: Expositors Greek New Testament Brother Link Hudson, you were I got the idea “Linguist” from. This is the word this commentary uses.

      Speaking in tongues —Let’s examine primary Scripture portions that lead us to understand Holy Spirit better. Acts 1:4-5; 2:1-4 On one occasion, while he was eating with them, he gave them this command: “Do not leave Jerusalem, but wait for the gift my Father promised, which you have heard me speak about. [5] For John baptized with water, but in a few days you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit.” … [2:1] When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. [2] Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. [3] They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. [4] All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit enabled them. and so on … http://www.pentecostaltheology.com/holy-spirit-and-speaking-in-tongues/?fbclid=IwAR0XNxWcbo1tber9vozUMN-G6jSB9xLNGjr2YeUfxjENvV1j9PA3kqZLgiw

  • Reply May 9, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    if you need understanding Jimmy Pearson

  • Neil Steven Lawrence

    I don’t like this recent tendency to remove the article before the word Holy Spirit. Can you say the same title about the Father or the Son without the word “the“ in it?

    It should say:

    “Understanding the Holy Spirit…“

    • Isara Mo
      Reply May 10, 2020

      Isara Mo

      Neil Steven Lawrence
      The definitive signs the KNOWN..
      Good observation.

  • Isara Mo
    Reply May 10, 2020

    Isara Mo

    Without wanting to demean the post I always ask myself how did those unlearned disciples KNOW about the Holy Spirit without there being a professor of theology or rather an expert theologian to expound or explain the Holy Spirit to them?.
    How did the 120 know it was Him at Pentecost?..
    What about Cornelius and his household..

  • Reply May 10, 2020

    Varnel Watson

    I dont believe Janice Hutton believes it that way

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