Holiness, sanctification

Holiness, sanctification
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  1. Holiness, sanctification

Holiness – qatesh – has the idea of separation, a cutting of what is not from God. To be holy is to be separated unto the holy. God is sanctifying us. The firing glory shines out from the holy. The profane is the opposite of the holy, it is the common. If we make fun of scripture we are profane, and unholy. To be holy is to be dedicated to God. Worship without fear is no worship. Worship needs deep reference. The holiness of God is a consuming fire.

God is jealous of his name, he does not allow worship if it is contrary to his nature.

Holiness is associated with wrath. Hes.38:

(see handout on Theology of Holiness for further points)

 

Holiness refers to the essential nature of God. To be sanctified is to be God-ivied.

Salvation is the way of thinking of all the wholeness, of which God brings us by the Holy Spirit. Salvation is all the provision of God, that Christ gave us in Christ through the Spirit, healing, etc.

 

Discipleship is then the essential ongoing relationship with Jesus.

The commission to disciple is found in Mt.28.18. Baptize into the name, that is into the reality of God, therefor teach everything.

We deny ourselves to a world that falls away, and choose simultaneously the cross. The cross leads home. The primary reference is Jesus Christ, a person and not only principles.

The community loves as he loves.

Hear oh Israel, hearing is also going and doing it. Following Jesus on the journey requires discipleship, which is in love.

15 Comments

  • Troy Day
    Reply November 18, 2019

    Troy Day

    Sanctification as a Biblical Word
    To assess competing claims about sanctification we must first attend to the biblical language of sanctification. Then, the biblical terminology for sanctification must also be related to ways of articulating a doctrine of sanctification, which we will examine in the next major section.

    1.1. Old Testament Background
    Before examining NT usage, a brief statement of OT sanctification terminology will be useful. In this section I am simply summarizing Peterson’s own work since it nicely captures the main thrust of OT teaching.15

    The central reality in any discussion of sanctification is the holiness of God himself. One of the most common epithets for God in the OT is “the Holy One.”16 God is holy, which means that he is morally pure, separate from all sin and defilement, but also separate (transcendent) from all created things in his “majesty, sovereignty and awesome power.”17

    Because God is holy, all that is unholy must be cast out his presence. “Nevertheless, many Old Testament passages indicate that holiness can be attributed or imparted to people or objects because they are cleansed and consecrated to the Lord and his service.”18 When one is sanctified one is set apart for God’s special use. However (and just as importantly), the consecration of God’s people is rooted in God’s election and work of redemption. Sinful people cannot be consecrated for service to God unless they are first purified and cleansed of their sinful defilements. God is the one who takes the initiative in sanctifying his people. Israel is specifically set apart by God as his “possession” (סְגֻלָּה), a “holy nation” (גוֹי קָדוֹשׁ). This consecration, however, is only possible because of the mediation and atonement that is worked by God in and through the priestly system, encapsulated above all in the Day of Atonement (Lev 16). In other words, Israel is called to be holy, but must first be cleansed by God and thereby granted a holy status.19 If it were not for this latter fact, God’s awesome holiness would have annihilated Israel (see e.g., Exod 19:22–24).20

    Finally, because God is holy and has set his people apart as holy, He “demand[s] holiness of living as a response,” which is best summed up in the first half of Leviticus 11:44: “For I am the LORD your God. Consecrate yourselves therefore, and be holy, for I am holy.”21 Peterson summarizes OT teaching about the sanctification of God’s people like this: “holiness means being set apart for a relationship with the Holy One, to display his character in every sphere of life.”22

    http://www.pentecostaltheology.com/biblical-words-and-theological-meanings-sanctification-as-consecration-for-transformation/

  • RichardAnna Boyce
    Reply November 18, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    3. Summary and Conclusions
    The biblical word “sanctification” does not mean transformation, but it is clearly connected to transformation. The claim that linking sanctification with renewal and spiritual growth “obscures the distinctive meaning and value of the terminology in the New Testament” needs to be modified.73 The NT pattern can be summarized like this: at conversion believers are definitively set apart (sanctified) for God’s own special use. Also, at conversion believers die with Christ and are raised up with him to newness of life (the doctrine of definitive sanctification). Finally, believers must strive, in reliance on the Holy Spirit, to preserve, and live in light of, their holy status until the end of their lives (the doctrine of progressive sanctification).74 While neither the doctrines of definitive sanctification nor progressive sanctification are based narrowly on the meaning of sanctification words, both doctrines are integrally connected to the once-for-all setting apart of believers that is denoted by the biblical terminology of sanctification. Sanctification is consecration for the purpose of transformation. Thus, the argument that we should not speak (even doctrinally) of sanctification as transformation needs nuancing. Is there really a significant difference in arguing, as Peterson does, that “sanctification means having a new identity, with the obligation to live according to that identity,” rather than arguing that sanctification is a process?75

    As we have seen, one could argue (like Peterson) that other terminology corresponds more closely with biblical usage. For example one could (as John Calvin does) use the word regeneration rather than sanctification.76 This could be said to have the benefit of simplicity: believers are regenerated by God at conversion, and God continues to regenerate (renew) them until the end of their lives. This, however, would simply be using different words to convey the same theological reality that is conveyed in the doctrines of definitive and progressive sanctification. And it is very doubtful whether the lexicographical meaning of any single biblical word (including regeneration) can capture the entire picture of Christian development from conversion to final glorification.77 What is of primary importance is the substance of the concept being described, not the specific word used as the doctrinal heading (sanctification, regeneration, etc.). Using the word sanctification to depict Spirit-wrought transformation of believers seems to have become so entrenched in theological discussion that employing a different term would probably introduce more confusion than clarity. And more significantly, we have seen that sanctification terminology does indeed have a close and vital link with transformation. Most importantly, the substance of the doctrines of definitive and progressive sanctification is indeed biblical.

  • Troy Day
    Reply November 18, 2019

    Troy Day

    RichardAnna Boyce lets put it this way plain and simple

    without entire sanctification the BIBLE ap Paul says you will not see GOD at all – period – end

    if you dont have holiness in this life and you think it will happen at the end of your life Right there when you are about to meet Jesus you will find out that you got no sanctification and cant see GOD – period – end for eternity Joe Absher GOD is my witness I’ve known many ol progressos who hoped to get holy at the end and never saw GOD coming

    • RichardAnna Boyce
      Reply November 19, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      but i received God’s promise of eternal security 100 times in John’s Gospel; so my loved ones are 100 percent sure of where i am going when i leave this life. Are yours?

    • Troy Day
      Reply November 19, 2019

      Troy Day

      RichardAnna Boyce You will not see Jesus without sanctification Paul says it – read Hebrews

  • Daniel J Hesse
    Reply November 18, 2019

    Daniel J Hesse

    A definite work of grace? Second?

  • Troy Day
    Reply November 19, 2019

    Troy Day

    Entire Sanctification, also known as Substantiation Sanctification or Instantaneous Sanctification, is the lost Doctrine of the Church. Early Modern Pentecostalism came from the Holiness Movement. However, in today’s society, it has been neglected and failed to be taught in our bible colleges until we have come to the point of absolutely no understanding of it whatsoever. Nevertheless, the
    Doctrine of Entire Sanctification is still emphasized in the word of God as a second, definite experience for the believer. We are warned in Hebrews 12:14 should we fail to obtain such experience. In conclusion, I must state that HOLINESS IS THE RESULT OF A SANCTIFIED LIFE. RichardAnna Boyce I read your long long too long copy paste with references to Hebrews – I see you got no interpretation for 12:14 Finally, the use of ἁγιασμός is Hebrews 12:14 should also be understood in the same way: if people do not “pursue” (διώκω) “holiness” (ἁγιασμός) throughout their lives they will not see the Lord (i.e., be saved) in the end. Even though ἁγιασμός means separateness from defilement and sin, this separateness must be continually manifest throughout the Christian life. Believers are set apart as holy, and they must strive to preserve that holy status until the final judgment. As Anthony Thiselton puts it, believers must be “holy in life, as a habituated pattern which has become reflected in settled character.”70 Thus, even in Hebrews, where the definitiveness of sanctification is the most pronounced in the whole NT, it is seen that sanctification/holiness must be maintained over the entirety of a believer’s life.

  • RichardAnna Boyce
    Reply November 19, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Hebrews 12:14-21
    If the readers viewed their hardships as part of God’s beneficial discipline, this would help them endure and finish their Christian pilgrimage well. For those tempted to respond negatively, the author issues a final “warning passage.”

    1. A word of caution for the disobedient (12:14-17)
    Just as believers should help the “weaker” ones (vv 12-13), so the whole community has a responsibility to look out for any who might drift away from the Lord.
    12:14. He exhorts them to pursue peace with all people. By “all people,” he means all in the community of faith, since both the preceding and following contexts have these in view. By peace, the author may have in mind the Hebrew concept of “shalom”–not merely peace but one’s whole welfare. To pursue peace with everyone in God’s family would be to seek for their total welfare, especially their spiritual well-being. The words translated “pursue” and “peace” are also found in combination in Rom 14:19, in a context calling for mutual concern and edification among believers (cf. Ps 34:14).
    Each believer also needs to pursue holiness (or “sanctification,” hagiasmos). This normally denotes progressive sanctification (e.g., Rom 6:19), and the preceding context confirms that meaning here (note “partakers of His holiness” in Heb 12:10). This is essential for one to see the Lord.
    In light of the epistle’s eschatological concerns (Christ’s return was referred to in both 9:28 and 10:37), “seeing the Lord” probably looks forward to that future moment that completes the sanctification process when each believer will see the Lord face to face and be like Him (cf. 1 John 3:2). Though none of us will become completely like Christ in this life, yet because this is our ultimate destiny, we ought to pursue sanctification now (cooperating with God in His discipline of us).
    Just as all true sons partake of God’s discipline (Heb 12:8), so also all enter the sanctification process, progress to some degree, and ultimately see the Lord. The text is not saying that people will be saved in the final analysis because they attain to a certain level of holiness. Simple faith in Christ and His atoning work is the sole basis by which people go to heaven, not the extent of their sanctification.
    12:15. The same communal spiritual concern includes being on the lookout for anyone who might fall short of the grace of God. The stress on progressive sanctification suggests this does not mean a failure to believe the gospel. In light of the context of Hebrews (especially the weak and failing ones mentioned in vv 12-13), this probably looks at the failure to appropriate God’s grace for successfully completing one’s Christian pilgrimage (cf. 4:16). This can lead to a root of bitterness in the believer’s life (cf. Deut 29:18-21), that furthers a hardened unbelieving heart and eventually leads to withdrawal from the community into apostasy. Like a bad disease, this can spread to others and defile them.
    12:16-17. Immaturity (and spurning the grace of God) can degenerate to an immoral lifestyle that further hardens a believer’s heart. In Esau’s case he was the firstborn son and therefore entitled to the firstborn’s inheritance rights. Later on he wanted that privilege back, but found it was too late. Hence, he found no place for repentance, that is, Isaac, his father, would not change his mind. Not even tears could change his father’s mind and restore what he, Esau, had forfeited (Gen 27:34,38). One must be careful not to follow in Esau’s footsteps in light of the future eschatological “rest” (and inheritance) at stake.

    2. The contrast of two covenants (12:18-24)
    The thought of Esau forfeiting his inheritance is analogous to any who might jeopardize his future by turning back to the Old Covenant. T

    If the readers viewed their hardships as part of God’s beneficial discipline, this would help them endure and finish their Christian pilgrimage well. For those tempted to respond negatively, the author issues a final “warning passage.”

    1. A word of caution for the disobedient (12:14-17)
    Just as believers should help the “weaker” ones (vv 12-13), so the whole community has a responsibility to look out for any who might drift away from the Lord.
    12:14. He exhorts them to pursue peace with all people. By “all people,” he means all in the community of faith, since both the preceding and following contexts have these in view. By peace, the author may have in mind the Hebrew concept of “shalom”–not merely peace but one’s whole welfare. To pursue peace with everyone in God’s family would be to seek for their total welfare, especially their spiritual well-being. The words translated “pursue” and “peace” are also found in combination in Rom 14:19, in a context calling for mutual concern and edification among believers (cf. Ps 34:14).
    Each believer also needs to pursue holiness (or “sanctification,” hagiasmos). This normally denotes progressive sanctification (e.g., Rom 6:19), and the preceding context confirms that meaning here (note “partakers of His holiness” in Heb 12:10). This is essential for one to see the Lord.
    In light of the epistle’s eschatological concerns (Christ’s return was referred to in both 9:28 and 10:37), “seeing the Lord” probably looks forward to that future moment that completes the sanctification process when each believer will see the Lord face to face and be like Him (cf. 1 John 3:2). Though none of us will become completely like Christ in this life, yet because this is our ultimate destiny, we ought to pursue sanctification now (cooperating with God in His discipline of us).
    Just as all true sons partake of God’s discipline (Heb 12:8), so also all enter the sanctification process, progress to some degree, and ultimately see the Lord. The text is not saying that people will be saved in the final analysis because they attain to a certain level of holiness. Simple faith in Christ and His atoning work is the sole basis by which people go to heaven, not the extent of their sanctification.
    12:15. The same communal spiritual concern includes being on the lookout for anyone who might fall short of the grace of God. The stress on progressive sanctification suggests this does not mean a failure to believe the gospel. In light of the context of Hebrews (especially the weak and failing ones mentioned in vv 12-13), this probably looks at the failure to appropriate God’s grace for successfully completing one’s Christian pilgrimage (cf. 4:16). This can lead to a root of bitterness in the believer’s life (cf. Deut 29:18-21), that furthers a hardened unbelieving heart and eventually leads to withdrawal from the community into apostasy. Like a bad disease, this can spread to others and defile them.
    12:16-17. Immaturity (and spurning the grace of God) can degenerate to an immoral lifestyle that further hardens a believer’s heart. In Esau’s case he was the firstborn son and therefore entitled to the firstborn’s inheritance rights. Later on he wanted that privilege back, but found it was too late. Hence, he found no place for repentance, that is, Isaac, his father, would not change his mind. Not even tears could change his father’s mind and restore what he, Esau, had forfeited (Gen 27:34,38). One must be careful not to follow in Esau’s footsteps in light of the future eschatological “rest” (and inheritance) at stake.

    2. The contrast of two covenants (12:18-24)
    The thought of Esau forfeiting his inheritance is analogous to any who might jeopardize his future by turning back to the Old Covenant.

    • Troy Day
      Reply November 19, 2019

      Troy Day

      proper exegesis of the text shows 12:14 with the use of ἁγιασμός is Hebrews 12:14 should also be understood in the same way: if people do not “pursue” (διώκω) “holiness” (ἁγιασμός) throughout their lives they will not see the Lord (i.e., be saved) in the end. Even though ἁγιασμός means separateness from defilement and sin, this separateness must be continually manifest throughout the Christian life. Believers are set apart as holy, and they must strive to preserve that holy status until the final judgment. As Anthony Thiselton puts it, believers must be “holy in life, as a habituated pattern which has become reflected in settled character.”70 Thus, even in Hebrews, where the definitiveness of sanctification is the most pronounced in the whole NT, it is seen that sanctification/holiness must be maintained over the entirety of a believer’s life.

    • RichardAnna Boyce
      Reply November 19, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day when will you be 100 percent sure you have persevered in holiness, or strived enough to preserve your personal holiness? When you meet God in several years time? Will your loved ones be sure at your funeral? Do you evangelise to unbelievers that they must sign up for a personal struggle that they will never be sure they have persevere enough? Is their any temptation to boast that you can persevere better than others? How many pastors have you burnt out trying to pastor your lack of assurance, and those you have evangelised???????????

  • Troy Day
    Reply November 19, 2019

    Troy Day

  • RichardAnna Boyce
    Reply November 19, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    If you say that total sanctification is one of the conditions on “How to Have Eternal Life.” then that becomes a work. An unbeliever is given eternal life by believing in Christ to receive it. We are saved by grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone; not in Christ plus total or entire sanctification.

  • RichardAnna Boyce
    Reply November 19, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Lordship Salvation has an effect upon the assurance of the believer.
    Assurance from the objective promise of God recedes in importance to the subjective assessment of the quality of faith of the one professing faith and the equally subjective evaluation of visible fruits of total sanctification.
    No longer is emphasis on gospel proclamation as “only” salvation from sin, because it is believed the gospel itself demands visible fruits of total sanctification.

  • George Hartwell
    Reply November 19, 2019

    George Hartwell

    Another hard-fought detailed discussion of the fine points of doctrine, and definitions of holiness. Is this another ‘you search the scriptures’ but miss Jesus times? No intuition, common sense or reference to people’s experience? In practical exploration of how is the church doing in generating the fruit of Christians who live healed and holy and are radiant lives that are sources of life, love and peace (shalom) to others. The holiness movement and early Methodists talked about this but they also lived it and had practices in their meetings that helped produce what they talked about. The devil got us distracted on definitions of holiness, complete sanctification and so on and we forgot the reality.

    • RichardAnna Boyce
      Reply November 19, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      i agree George Hartwell about the differences in doctrine. For that reason i am trying to condense the discussion to assurance of salvation: whether loved ones are sure when we die, and whether we can give assurance of eternal life when we evangelise?

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