Dr. Mohler, Our Nation is One Vast Mission Field…

Dr. Mohler, Our Nation is One Vast Mission Field…
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The new data from the Pew Research Center is sobering and important. With hard numbers, it confirms what we have observed for decades now. We are witnessing the rapid and accelerating secularization of America. The numbers point to a disappointing pattern of lessening identification with Christianity and falling church attendance rates. There is also no sign that these trends will be slowed, much less reversed. This is, for Christians, a confirmation of the fact that our nation is growing more distant from the Gospel and hardening its resistance to Christian truth. These trends have been visible for some time, but there is a startling new velocity to these changes, and one that we and our churches had better look closely and think hard about what they mean.

The saving power of the Gospel of Jesus Christ remains as true as ever, but the fact is that the evangelistic landscape of our nation is changing right before our eyes. The rise of self-identified unbelievers as a percentage of the population is one significant factor, but the falling rates of church participation among those who identify as Christians is perhaps more alarming.

All this points to the fact that the United States, following the sad example of Europe, is becoming a post-Christian culture—one in which decreasing percentages of Americans operate out of a Christian frame of reality. We are on the threshold of a radically new reality. This had better awaken American Christians to the new evangelistic and missions challenge right before our eyes and in our own neighborhoods. Our nation is becoming one vast mission field, with growing numbers of Americans who have virtually no knowledge of Christianity at all. We are going to have to rethink how we see our own nation, and redouble, again and again, our commitment to share Christ.

These changes will mean a reshaped moral landscape as well. The eclipse of Christianity and the rise of secularism means less commitment to Christian morality—especially sexual morality—and points to greater hostility toward those who contend for Christian morality. Secularization has immediate theological consequences, but comes with moral and political consequences as well.

These are indeed sobering trends, but Christians can handle the truth. Our responsibility, regardless of the survey data, is to preach and teach and tell and take the saving Gospel of Jesus Christ. This new report from Pew should make us even more determined to be faithful in our evangelism, starting right at home.

Dr. Albert Mohler Jr. is president of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky.

18 Comments

  • Troy Day
    Reply November 3, 2019

    Troy Day

    here we go Jim Price Michael Ellis Carter Jr.

  • Louise Cummings
    Reply November 3, 2019

    Louise Cummings

    Amen.

  • Troy Day
    Reply November 4, 2019

    Troy Day

    Joe Absher take heed – the sky is falling

  • Joe Absher
    Reply November 4, 2019

    Joe Absher

    seems simple enough?

  • Troy Day
    Reply November 4, 2019

    Troy Day

    The saving power of the Gospel of Jesus Christ remains as true as ever, but the fact is that the evangelistic landscape of our nation is changing right before our eyes. The rise of self-identified unbelievers as a percentage of the population is one significant factor, but the falling rates of church participation among those who identify as Christians is perhaps more alarming.

    All this points to the fact that the United States, following the sad example of Europe, is becoming a post-Christian culture—one in which decreasing percentages of Americans operate out of a Christian frame of reality. We are on the threshold of a radically new reality. This had better awaken American Christians to the new evangelistic and missions challenge right before our eyes and in our own neighborhoods. Our nation is becoming one vast mission field, with growing numbers of Americans who have virtually no knowledge of Christianity at all. We are going to have to rethink how we see our own nation, and redouble, again and again, our commitment to share Christ.

    • Joe Absher
      Reply November 4, 2019

      Joe Absher

      Exodus 1:12 KJV — But the more they afflicted them, the more they multiplied and grew. And they were grieved because of the children of Israel.

      You say, “The sky is falling” all is lost . are you falling for nationalism . is that the motive . or is it souls souls souls perishing and doomed .
      . the darker and more perverse it is the brighter the gospel shines in grace and cleansing power . at least for the willing and obedient .

  • RichardAnna Boyce
    Reply November 5, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    how can we be relevant when we evangelise a conditional gospel; so no believer has assurance of eternal salvation?

  • Troy Day
    Reply November 5, 2019

    Troy Day

    RichardAnna Boyce Did Jesus Call Us to Be Relevant? http://www.pentecostaltheology.com/did-jesus-call-us-to-be-relevant/

  • RichardAnna Boyce
    Reply November 5, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Jesus gave us a Gospel that would give total assurance of eternal destiny to those who believe it. Jesus calls us to be relevant by preaching His Gospel of total assurance. When we preach a conditional Gospel (for example ‘lose your faith = lose your salvation’) then we put pastors who have to clear up the mess of ‘no assurance’, under pressure of burnout and loss of faith themselves 🙁

  • Troy Day
    Reply November 5, 2019

    Troy Day

    RichardAnna Boyce Jesus Called Christians to Be ‘Perfect.’ NOT relevant Perfection means complete holiness via entire sanctification TODAY – else the church is no different than a sinful unreprented world

    Jesus Called Christians to Be ‘Perfect.’ What Does That Mean?
    An exploration of Matthew 5:48 may apply Let’s take a closer look at this verse: “Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.” The most important word in this verse is clear: perfect. But what if that is not the best English word to use to translate the original Hebrew word?

    The original word used in this verse is tamim. Many scholars argue that this word may actually be better translated into English as whole or complete. If we read this verse as “be complete as your heavenly Father is complete,” it starts to look a little different. It asks us to wonder what being whole or complete in God looks like.

    One of the synonyms of complete is integrated. To be integrated is to have all the aspects of our lives match up without conflict. It is to have what you believe on the inside match what you are doing on the outside.

    In other words, it is practicing what you preach.

    SO if you preach salvation but have never repented from your sins well you see my point Joe Absher Ed Brewer Jim Price

    • RichardAnna Boyce
      Reply November 5, 2019

      RichardAnna Boyce

      Troy Day, i always say that for BELIEVERS it is COMPULSORY to 1 John 1:9 repent and agree with God to earn rewards in the Millennium; so please dont twist my words implying i am saying believers never need to repent brother. Matthew 5:44-48 I agree
      the word perfect in its normal sense means sinless righteousness. This is what God is (1 John 1:5), and what believers should be as well. Such a shocking statement is a proper conclusion to the section of the sermon on pharisaical tradition. The section begins with Christ’s statement in Matt 5:20 that perfect righteousness is God’s requirement for entrance into the kingdom of heaven. God is spirit, we will enter heaven as spirits, with a spiritual body; God/ Christ is perfect, so our spirit is perfect now, as we are in Christ, and Christ is in us. The implied question was, “How can anyone be that righteous?” Jesus gives six examples on how perfection is revealed, and then concludes by saying that if believers can do these things they will be perfect.

      Those who try to attain such perfection by their soul/bodies’ works should now be sufficiently deflated. No one can attain such righteousness on his or her own. The only way any person can become as perfect as the Father in heaven is if God gives His righteousness to him in his spirit.

      For those who have already believed in Jesus for eternal life, however, Jesus does not lower the standard; He presents it as an ideal to aim for, in our soul/body where the rubber hits the road, even though He knows people will still fall short. And even then, in context, the goal is not external soul/body righteousness, but the inner spirit purity and love Christ has been extolling (cf. 1 Peter 1:13-16).

    • Louise Cummings
      Reply November 5, 2019

      Louise Cummings

      Troy Day yes as he was saying you earn your rewards in the Thousand year reign. You earn your rewards now as we use our gifts that God has given us to do now. If we hide our talents. That He has given us. He will take it and give it to the one who has gained the most. He intends for us to use our talents now as we obey Him. Then at the Rapture is when we will gain our rewards. Our Crown we will cast at his feet. That’s how I see it. We don’t wait until we get to the thousand year Reign. We work for Him now. And can’t change , because the world is changing. We have to be steadfast and true , and Holy. It like you said. Jesus said, be he Holy , for I Am Holy.

    • Joe Absher
      Reply November 6, 2019

      Joe Absher

      Mrs Louise Cummings please be advised the afore mentioned is no “he” it’s a woman using her husband’s name. Claiming they are “one flesh”

    • Louise Cummings
      Reply November 6, 2019

      Louise Cummings

      Joe Absher I am so glad you told me. I have got to be careful who I make comments behind. I couldn’t figure her out. I thought it was a man. Thank you so much.

    • Troy Day
      Reply November 7, 2019

      Troy Day

      Robert Menzies challenges the position that )iaûq~& does not mean “Christians” in
      this case. He notes that Luke also used the relative pronoun ~ivq with paûrlr6ç in other
      places, such as his description of Ananias (9: 10) and Tirnothy (16: 1). In addition, Luke
      deliberately mentions Apollos in connection with the disciples at Ephesus. Apollos’ standing
      can hardly be questioned, for Luke indicates that he had ben “instnicted in the way of the
      Lord” and “taught accurately about Jesus” (1 8:25). Moreover, Apollos’ preaching was
      delivered under the inspiration of the Spirit “ÇÉwv TG rrv&6pcmn. Thus Luke connects these
      disciples with Apollos, highlighting the similarity of their faith in Christ (hrough their
      baptism of repentance

  • Troy Day
    Reply November 7, 2019

    Troy Day

    Joe Absher are you sure about the boy and the girl THe copy paste could be a woman BUT there is much to said to the logical trend of thought that follows

  • Joe Absher
    Reply November 7, 2019

    Joe Absher

    That’s my problem as politely as I can : it seem it may me one flesh but two heads even more fabrications I.e. initially presenting a man

  • Troy Day
    Reply November 7, 2019

    Troy Day

    Mohler is quite right William DeArteaga Isara Mo

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