Does your church still have an altar and when do you use it?

Does your church still have an altar and when do you use it?
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19 Comments

  • Louise Cummings
    Reply September 20, 2018

    Louise Cummings

    Yes. They can go to the alter. Anytime they wish. Sometimes we have one go to the alter during sing or at the end of the message. We have no set time. As a usual time , it’s T the end of preaching. But we had a young girl that was visiting our church. She was ask to sing a special. While she was we had a lady get up and go to the alter while the young girl was singing. The lady that went to the alter, got saved and was weeping. And prayed. But didn’t disturb the service at all. The young girl just kept on singing. She was singing by sound track. By the time her song was finished. The laggy had already come to the alter, got saved. , she really got blessed. And back to her seat. Before the song was finished. Anytime you feel you should go to the altar at our church. You go. When it God , it never disturbed the service.

  • Link Hudson
    Reply September 20, 2018

    Link Hudson

    Do you offer sheep or incense on your altar?

    • Louise Cummings
      Reply September 20, 2018

      Louise Cummings

      No way. Only my self. The Old Testament Of offering up sacrifices. It’s dangerous. Some of the Jews or it could be Gentiles. But we give ourselves to God. Can’t do it for anyone else. But I can pray for the. Giving them , decanting them to the Lord , praying God will save them but Hebrews ch. 6! Says after you have believed in Jesus , and tasted of the heavenly gifts. And fall away. It’s impossible to renew them again to repentance. That word falling away doesn’t mean just getting cold in the Lord. Or I would call it backsliding. But it means you have believed in Jesus and decide that’s isn’t right and go back to offering sacrifices again. Of animals , it impossible to renew them to Repentance. What I believe it means. If you go astray. Jesus makes it clear we can repent. I never believed in offering sacrifices. Except Jesus. He did that Himself. Because He loves us. But we give ourself to God. Putting away fleshy desires. Because you have to be in or out. You can’t be sinner and Christian at the same time.

    • Link Hudson
      Reply September 20, 2018

      Link Hudson

      Louise Cummings my question was to point out we use ‘altar’ different from its meaning in the Bible.

      Paul and/ir those with him who were under a vow mqy have offered sacrifices in Acts 21-22. I dont think they considered sacrificing to be rejecting Christ.

    • Louise Cummings
      Reply September 20, 2018

      Louise Cummings

      The offering up Animals as they did in the Old Testament. Is wrong. That was fulfilled in Jesus offering up His Blood. No more sacrifices for sin will ever have to be offered. His was Offered once. That’s good through all the ages. No more Sacrifices will ever have to be offered again. Jesus Christ and His Blood was all that was worthy. He will never have to do it again. His Blood was secure for all who would believe in Him.

  • Louise Cummings
    Reply September 20, 2018

    Louise Cummings

    I guess you might have been talking about fasting any those kind of sacrificing. Yes I do believe in that if your body is able to hold up to it. I don’t fast often enough. Or set a day or two of three days to giving yourself to more prayer than usual. That kind of sacrifice. Is good in the sight of the Lord. I believe.

  • Troy Day
    Reply September 20, 2018

    Troy Day

    There is no altar for salvation and sanctification the baptist church a call for recommitment The ones who were raised baptist dont have a clue what a real Pentecostal altar call is

  • Link Hudson
    Reply September 20, 2018

    Link Hudson

    Altars in churches aren’t really Biblical. They redefined ‘altar’ away from the Biblical meaning. ‘Altar’ sort of makes sense if the Roman Catholics who see offering the mass as offering a sacrifice.

    I was asked to fill in at a Missionary Baptist church once. The worship leader made much of having an altar at the front, slapping the woodeen box with carpet on it they’d made.

    Biblically, though, there is no reason to think we should have an altar in church. And if there were a literal altar, it would be along the lines of a high place, or else an incense altar.

    Having to go up to a certain altar to pray is Pentecostal tradition (and tradition in other churches), but not a Biblical practice per se

  • Troy Day
    Reply September 20, 2018

    Troy Day

    Altars in churches aren’t really Biblical? Says who? Oh hold on a bapticostal example coming from Link Hudson Why am I NOT surprised one little bit again ??? Charles Finney began using what we understand as the “altar call” or the “invitation” as a tool by which to proclaim the gospel and compel hearers to repentance and conversion. While few if any of us today use Finney’s “anxious bench,” the altar call remains a standard procedure and a recognized part of a pastor’s evangelistic tool kit in many churches

  • Louise Cummings
    Reply September 20, 2018

    Louise Cummings

    You can make an altar to pray any where. What I mean doesn’t have to be a special made alter. I mean any where you want to pray. It becomes an altar. Because you are talking to the Lord. But a Church without an altar. That’s sad. You invite people to church to worship, and sinners there that’s wants to pray. And you don’t have anywhere for them to pray. You seem to be rooting God out. Or on the other hand. You could ask why do I need God. Please don’t ever say that , questioning God. Everyone needs God. You just don’t need to root him out. Is it a Pharisee spirit you go to church. To be seen of men. Make me up some rules that is easy. Doesn’t cost me much. Oh no please don’t let anyone lift a hand. Some dignitary might be there. If I’m in a worshipping church. Let me get hid. Don’t let them know I’m here. Tell me if you are not serious about God. Please get serious. It will make you feel so much better about God. And yourself too.

  • Link Hudson
    Reply September 20, 2018

    Link Hudson

    What does ‘Baptist’ have to do with what I wrote about altar calls? I’ve seen a Baptist make a big deal of having an ‘altar.’ My concern is with Biblical Christianity.

    You know that the altar call goes back (partly) to Finney. I read Methodist revivals could have a ‘mourner’s bench’ at the front, too. So you know it isn’t a first century thing. If “Pentecostal” refers to people who have the experience described in Acts 2, what does being Pentecostal have to do with church furniture arrangements from the 1800’s?

    In the Bible, there was an altar, something like a giant barbecue area for sacrifices, and an altar for burning incense in the tabernacle and temple, and prior to that, Israelites were to offer sacrifices on altars of earth with unhewn stone. Roman Catholics think of their masses like a repeated sacrifice. So the raised communion table, for blessing the bread and wine was called an ‘altar.’ It was in the front area.

    Fast forward to the late 1800’s or early 1900’s, and you might see a kneeling bench in the front of the church sactuary. In my day, Pentecostals called the area up near the front, steps to the stage– possibly around a table with ‘This in Remembrance of Me’– or maybe not– the ‘altar.’ The meaning is different from both it’s Biblical and traditional meaning.

    Old timey Baptist churches had ‘altar calls, too’, and I would venture to guess they had them before the Pentecostal movement. So you may be the ‘Bapticostal’ one on this issue.

    I am not saying it is wrong to gather in a particular place to pray. But we need to realize that certain ways of doing things are tradition, not scripture. Biblical Christianity is not dependent on the existence of furniture arrangements that evolved over time or that did not develop until the 1800’s. We read of a number of references to churches that met in houses in the New Testament. The practice of meeting in a basillica with an ‘altar’ in the front evolved centuries later, and American Methodist, Baptist, and other evangelical practices of having prayer furniture or a prayer area called the ‘altar’ is much later than that.

    We should not get Pharisaical about tradition. The Pharisees had their traditions and treated them like the Bible, sometimes exalting them above the Bible, and considered people unspiritual for not keeping their man-made traditions.

  • Guy Caley
    Reply September 21, 2018

    Guy Caley

    An altar? For blood sacrifice? I think Jesus already took care of that. The cross was the final altar we needed. Now prayer benches are a different story. Those we have, use and need.

  • Louise Cummings
    Reply September 21, 2018

    Louise Cummings

    The Baptist Churches I have been to. I didn’t see an alter. The preacher just stood in front of the church. They called it. If anyone wants to make a decision for the Lord today. And sometimes several would go forward. And shake hands with the preacher. He might say a word or two them. The they went back to their seats. I was raised Baptist until , I Shute I had turned a teenager. Believe me they had alters then. I remember the men getting on one side of the church outside before church started. The women on the other side. You should have heard all those people pray. Then everyone came inside when church started. I have seen those people shout. When they had testimony service. The women would just about preach when they testified. That’s the kind of Baptist. I grew up in. But you never heard that , you were way to young. It settled down before I was a teenager. They just didn’t teach the Holy Ghost. I heard of one Holiness church before we moved to the location of near Tuscumbia Al. It was called Spring Valley Al. They had a Church Of God there. I got started has never mm own going there to church. I got I believe really saved or Sanctified. Then filled with the Holy Ghost. And still in it today. I’ve got family still in the Baptist. But my immediate family has never known anything but Church Of God. But I have never seen churches ,
    Pentecostal , for sure without alters. I don’t know about others. But Church Of God. Has always had alters.

  • Jevan Little
    Reply September 21, 2018

    Jevan Little

    Yes, most services at the end there is an alter call

  • Troy Day
    Reply September 21, 2018

    Troy Day

    Link Hudson According to your own denomination the founders of the Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee) recognized the central importance of the altar experience in church and home and made a statement on church and family altar one of their earliest measures. From the 1906 Church of God General Assembly, here is their resolution on “family worship”:

    “Family worship was considered and the Assembly recommended and urged that the families of all the churches engage in this very sacred and important service at least once a day, and at a time most convenient to the household, and that the parents should see that every child is taught as early as possible to reverence God and his parents, by listening quietly and attentively to the reading of God’s Word and getting down on his knees during the prayer. The pastor and deacons of each church were advised to use their influence and make special effort to encourage every family in the church to engage in this devotional exercise every day” (Minutes of the 71st General Assembly of the Church of God 2006, p. 83).

    • Link Hudson
      Reply September 21, 2018

      Link Hudson

      Troy Day I spent about one uear in high school going to a COG that had grown due to peope moving into the area that felt more like an evanhelical chirch rather than Pentecostal because my dad wanted to go there Sunday wgile finishing out the Vible Quiz year at an A/G I had attended for 3 yearsm. I have attended attended GBIs which are different in culture and amphasis for maybe 2 or 3 years at times. So I don’t think of COG as ‘my denomination.’

      But I do not see ‘altar’ in that qupte. The denomination within the GVI denomination that Pak Niko was one of the leaders of in the early 2000s did use the term ‘family altar’. But the change of the use of the term between scripture and modern Pentecostal usage shpuld not be debatable should it?

    • Troy Day
      Reply September 21, 2018

      Troy Day

      all AGs I’ve ever been to have altar call and altars All the ones Terry Wiles ever built including

    • Link Hudson
      Reply September 21, 2018

      Link Hudson

      Troy Day had altars? An RCC communion table? A sacrificial barbecue pit? A this do in remembrance of me? A kneeling bench at the fronyt? Or just steps or an empty area used for prayer. I can’t remember seeking a kneeling bench in an A/G.

    • Troy Day
      Reply September 21, 2018

      Troy Day

      This is what they say Link Hudson The hunger for revival and personal experience with God that drove the early pioneers of the Church of God was also central to other holiness and Pentecostal groups at the outset of the twentieth century. A singular spiritual quest drew early Pentecostals to altars of prayer and revival. What God gave them there propelled them to the far-flung corners of the world with a spiritual passion to evangelize the lost. There is a special and unique “altar DNA” that underscores the unprecedented international growth of the global Pentecostal Movement. Much of this is captured in my collection of essays from outstanding Pentecostal figures from around the world, issued especially for the recent Centennial observance of the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angeles (Azusa Street and Beyond: 100 Years of Commentary on the Global Pentecostal/Charismatic Movement — details at http://www.AzusaStreetandBeyond.com).

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