89 Proofs of a Divine Trinity

Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

89 Proofs of a Divine Trinity #BOOM Finis Dake- Dake’s Annotated Reference Bible.

What we mean by Divine Trinity is that there are three separate and distinct persons in the Godhead, each one having His own personal spirit body, personal soul, and personal spirit in the same sense each human being, angel, or any other being has his own body, soul, and spirit. We mean by body, whether a spirit body or a flesh body, the house for the indwelling of the personal soul and spirit. The soul is that which feels and the spirit is that which knows.

The doctrine of the Trinity can be clearly seen, being understood by the visible things that are made, even to His eternal power and Godhead (Rom. 1:20). What on earth was created in the image and likeness of God? Man (Gen. 1:26-28). Do God’s image and likeness consist only of moral and spiritual powers? If so, it can be concluded that man is only a moral and spiritual being. Is God bodiless? If so, we can conclude that man is also bodiless.

Is God only one being made up of several persons or beings in the one being? If so, we can conclude that man is one person or being made up of many. Does God need a flesh body in order to have any kind of body? No! There are such things as spirit and heavenly bodies. See 1Cor. 15:35-38. From this passage we learn that all things in creation — grain, fish, birds, beasts, man, angels, and even the planets — have bodies, sizes, shapes, and forms.

The Bible declares that God has a body, shape, image, likeness, physical parts, a personal soul and spirit, and all other things that constitute a being or a person with a body, soul, and spirit (see note, Jn. 4:24; note, Jn. 5:37; The Doctrine of Man.

Angels, cherubim, seraphim, and all other spirit beings have spirit bodies and personal souls and spirits. They have been seen with the natural eyes of men over 100 times in Scripture (see Appearances of Angels to Men). If all other spirit beings have spirit bodies, could not the members of the Trinity also have spirit bodies? The 284 passages on spirits in Scripture prove that spirit bodies are just as real and capable of operation in the material worlds as are flesh bodies. There is no such thing as a world of creations made up of invisible substance. The so-called spirit world must be understood simply as spirit beings inhabiting material worlds created by God. Heaven itself is a material place(Gen. 1:1; Heb. 11:10-16), having cities, mansions, furniture, inhabitants, living conditions, etc.

God has been seen physically by human eyes many times (Gen. 18:1-33; 19:24; 32:24-30; Ex. 24:11; 33:11-23; Josh. 5:13-15; Judg. 6:11-23; 13:3-25; 1Chr. 21:16-17; Job 42:5; Isa. 6; Ezek. 1:26-28; 10:1,20; 40:3; Dan. 7:9-14; 10:5-10; Acts 7:56-59; Rev. 4:2-5; 5:1,5-7,11-14; 6:16; 7:9-17; 19:4; 21:3-5; 22:4).

In over 20,000 references about God in Scripture we get to know all we need to know about the subject. If we will take the Bible literally as to what it says about Him, as we do with other things the subject will be very clear; but if we make God a mystery, ignoring the plain statements of Scripture about Him, and refusing to believe the many descriptions of God given by those who have seen one, two, and three separate persons called “God,” then we ill remain in ignorance.

It is true there are a few figurative statements about God in Scripture, as there are about man and other things, but shall we do away with the reality of man and these other things because of a few figures of speech? Let us make man mere salt and lights (Mt. 5:13-14), if we are going to do away with God because of a few figures of speech.

We submit the following facts in Scripture to prove a Divine Trinity of separate persons in the Godhead:

1. The word “one” means one in unity as well as one in number. It means unity in 1Jn. 5:7, as it does in Jn. 17:11,21-23, and yet these three Persons, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Spirit, are spoken of as one each in number and individuality in Scripture. There is one God the Father, one Lord Jesus Christ, and one Holy Spirit (1Cor. 8:6; Eph. 4:3-6). Thus, there are three separate Persons in divine individuality and divine pluralty. The Father is called God (1Cor. 8:6), the Son is called God (Isa. 9:6,7; Heb. 1:8; Jn. 1:1-2; 20:28), and the Holy Spirit is called God (Acts 5:3-4). As individual persons each can be called God and collectively they can be spoken of as one God because of their perfect unity. The word “God” is used either as a singular or a plural word, like sheep. Everything that could be spoken of God collectively applies equally to each member of the Godhead as an individual, but there are some things that are said of each person of the Deity as to position, office, and work that could not be spoken as of the other members of the Godhead. The Father is the head of Christ (1Cor. 11:3); the Son is the only begotten of the Father (2Jn. 1:3), and the Holy Spirit proceeds from both the Father and the Son (Jn. 14:16,26; 15:26; 16:7-15; Acts 2:34).

2. Names of God prove plurality of persons.(Gen. 3:5; Ex. 22:28; 1Sam. 4:8; Dan. 2:11; 4:6-9; 5:11,14; etc.).

3. Plural pronouns are used of God, proving plurality of persons (Gen. 1:26; 3:22; 11:7; Isa. 6:8; Jn. 14:23; 17:11,22-23).

4. First, second, and third personal pronouns are used hundreds of times in Scripture, referring to one, two, and three persons of the Godhead in the same sense they are used of men. Sometimes the different members of the Deity use them to and of one another in the same sense man uses them. In Jn. 17 alone Jesus uses them 162 Times in speaking to and of His Father (cp. Jn. 14:16-17,26; 15:26; 16:7-15). Sometimes singular pronouns are used of the whole Godhead of three members as a unity (Ex. 20:3; Isa. 44:6,8; 45:5,21; 46:9; Hos. 13:4), just like the whole church as a unit is spoken of as a man and “he” (Eph. 2:14-15; 4:13; 5:25-27; 2Th. 2:7-8).

5. “Man is become as one of us” proves plurality of persons (Gen. 3:22).

6. Two and three Persons called God have been seen by the same men at the same time and places as being separate persons (Dan. 7:9-14; Mt. 3:16-17; Jn. 1:31-34; Acts 7:54-60; Rev. 6:16; 7:9-17; 21:22; 22:3).

7. Two Lords are mentioned in Gen. 19:24; one on earth and one in heaven.

8. Two Persons are referred to in the Old Testament See Ps. 8:5-6 with Heb. 2:5-18; Ps. 16:8-10 with Acts 2:25-36; Ps. 22:1-22 with Mt. 27:35,39-43,45-46; Heb. 9:14; 10:5-12; Ps. 40:6-10 with Heb. 10:5-7; and Ps. 45:6-7 with Heb. 1:8-9.

9. Two Lords are mentioned sitting side by side (Ps. 110:1,5; Mt. 22:44; 26:64; Acts 2:33-34; 7:54-56; Rom. 8:34; Eph. 1:20; Col. 3:1; Heb. 1:3,13; 8:1; 10:12; 12:2; 1Pet. 3:22; Rev. 22:3).

10. Two Persons are mentioned and required in order to understand the plain language of Ps. 2; 9:19; 132:17; Prov. 30:4; Isa. 4:2; 10:16-17; 28:16; 49:1-10; 50:4-11; 52:13 – Isa. 53:12; 62:11; Mic. 5:1-5; Jer. 23:4-8; 33:14-26; Zech. 3:8-10; 6:12-13. In these passages one is anointed, becomes the son of, is sent by, is taught by, and becomes the servant of the other; and both are called Lord.

11. Three self-acting Persons — the Lord God, the Messiah, and the Holy Spirit — are referred to as blessing, anointing, sending, and doing things for one another in Isa. 11:2; 42:1-7; 48:16; 59:21; 61:1-2; 63:1-14; Zech. 12:10 — Zech. 13:2.

12. In Zech. 1:7-21 the Lord of Hosts and the angel of the Lord (also called Lord, Zech. 1:19-20; 2:1-13) are talking together. One Lord says of the other Lord that He has sent Him to Israel (Zech. 2:8-13). One Lord refers to Himself as “Me” and to the Lord of Hosts as “His” and “He” (Zech. 2:8-11). The conference continues throughout Zechariah until Zech. 13:6-7 where both Lords are called fellows or associate.

13. Jesus Christ is called the son of Abraham, David, Mary, and of God (Mt. 1:1; Mk. 1:1; 6:3). He is just as much a separate person from God as He is of these other persons.

14. Two Persons are referred to many times in the New Testament (Mt. 11:27; Lk. 23:46; Jn. 1:1-2,18; 5:19-20; 14:1-9; 16:15; 17:3,10; Acts 2:38-39; 3:13-26; Php. 2:5-11; Eph. 3:5; Col. 1:5; 2Th. 2:16-17; Tit. 2:13; Heb. 1:1-3; Rev. 20:6; 22:3).

15. Two and three Persons are mentioned in the introductions to New Testament books (Rom. 1:1-4,7; 1Cor. 1:3; Jas. 1:1; 1Pet. 1:1-3; 2Jn. 1:3; Rev. 1:1-6; etc.).

16. God is the head of Christ and thus greater than He in position (1Cor. 3:23; 11:3; 1Chr. 29:11; Jn. 14:28).

17. Christ is the mediator between God and man, not between Himself and man (1Tim. 2:5).

18. Two and three Persons are referred to in every New Testament book (Mt. 3:16-17; 12:31-32; 17:5; 22:43-45; 28:19; Mk. 1:1-2,10; 13:32; Lk. 1:32-35; 2:40,52; 3:22; 4:1; 4:18; 9:35; 23:46; 24:39 with Jn. 4:24; Jn. 1:1-3,14,18; 5:17-25,31-38; 6:37,44-46,57; 7:16-18,28,37-39; 8:13-19,26-38,42,54; 10:15-18,24,29,36; 12:26-31,44,49-50; 14:1-26,28-30; 15:1-26; 16:1-33; 17:1-26; 18:11; 20:17,21; 18:11; 20:17,21; Acts 1:7-8; 2:24-36; 3:13-26; 4:10,26-31; 5:29-33; 7:37,55-56; 8:12-17; 9:17; 10:38-48; 17:31; Rom. 1:3,7,9; 5:1-11; 8:1-13,26-39; 1Cor. 1:3-9; 2:10; 3:23; 8:6; 11:3; 12:3; 15:57; 2Cor. 1:2-3; 5:17-21; 13:14; Gal. 1:1-3; Eph. 1:2-3; 3:14; 4:3-6; 6:23; Php. 1:2; 2:5-11; Col. 1:2-3,13-19; 3:1; 1Th. 1:1-10; 3:13; 2Th. 1:1-2; 2:16; 1Tim. 1:2; 2:5; 5:21; 6:14-16; 2Tim. 1:2; 4:1; Tit. 1:4; 2:13; Phm. 1:3; see note, Rev. 5:13 for 30 last New Testament references). In no conceivable way can we force a meaning of three persons in one person; three beings in one being; or three manifestations of only one person in any of these or any other scripture.

19. There are three distinct and separate witnesses that bear witness of Christ (1Jn. 5:5-11,13,20). Both God and man require this many personal and separate witnesses to confirm any point (Mt. 18:16; 2Cor. 13:1). The water and blood of 1Jn. 5:8 could not be accepted as accredited personal witnesses to confirm any point (Mt. 18:16; 2Cor. 13:1). The water and blood of 1Jn. 5:8 could not be accepted as accredited personal witness in themselves. The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are the only persnal witnesses of this passage. If we consider these to be only one person, then there are not the required number of witnesses to establish the truth of the Sonship of Jesus Christ. We are forced by facts to admit all of 1Jn. 5:7-8 as inspired Scripture and therefore, the fact that the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost are three separate and personal witnesses instead of being only one person or witness. Indeed, many scriptures confirm these three witnesses:

(1) The Father (Jer. 29:23; Mal. 3:5; Jn. 5:31-37, notes; Rom. 1:9; Heb. 1:1-2; 2:3-4)

(2) The Son (Isa. 55:4; Jn. 18:37; 1Tim. 6:13; Rev. 1:5)

(3) The Holy Spirit (Rom. 8:16; Jn. 15:26; Heb. 10:15; 1Jn. 3:6) If all three are witnesses, then they must be separate Persons. The water and the blood simply confirm the intelligent testimonies of the three Persons of the Godhead and give additional weight to the Sonship of Jesus.

20. The words through and by, used of Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit, but not once of the Father, prove that God to be a separate Person and the Head and Director of all things done by and through them (1Cor. 3:23; 11:3; Jn. 10:29; 14:28; 14:16-17,26; 15:26; 16:7-15; Acts 2:33-34):

(1) Through Jesus Christ (Acts 4:2; Rom. 1:8; 5:1,9,11; 6:23; 7:25; 15:17; 16:27; 1Cor. 15:57; 2Cor. 3:4; Gal. 3:14; 4:7; 5:10; Eph. 2:7,18; Php. 4:7,13; Tit. 3:6; Heb. 13:21; 1Pet. 1:22; 4:11; 1Jn. 4:9)

(2) By Jesus Christ (Jn. 1:3,10,17; 10:9; Acts 4:10; 10:36; Rom. 2:16; 3:22; 5:17,21; Gal. 1:1; Eph. 1:5; 3:9; Col. 1:15-20; 3:17; Heb. 1:1-3; 1Pet. 2:5; 5:10)

(3) Through the Holy Spirit (Acts 1:2; 21:4; Rom. 8:13; 15:13,19; Gal. 5:5; Eph. 2:22; Heb. 9:14)

(4) By the Holy Spirit (Ezek. 11:24; Mic. 3:8; Zech. 4:6; Mt. 12:28; Lk. 2:27; 4:1; Acts 11:28; Rom. 5:5; 15:19; 1Cor. 2:10; 6:11; 12:3,13)

Proofs that Jesus Is Not the Father:

21. The Father was in heaven all the time that Jesus was on earth (Mt. 5:16,48).

22. Christ now sits at the right hand of the Father (see note 9, above).

23. Jesus said He would confess men “before My Father,” proving He is not the Father (Mt. 10:32; Rev. 3:5).

24. Jesus always prayed to the Father as a separate Person (Mt. 11:25; Jn. 17).

25. The Father existed outside the body of Jesus, so He could not be Jesus (Mt. 2:12; 3:17; 17:5; Jn. 12:27-30).

26. Both Jesus and Satan refer to a God separate from Jesus (Mt. 4:6-10).

27. God was the Father of Jesus, not Jesus Himself (Eph. 1:3,17; 3:14).

28. In parables Jesus illustrates His relationship to the Father as that of separate persons (Mt. 21:33-46; Jn. 15:1-8).

29. People are taught to go directly to the Father and not to pray to Jesus (Jn. 14:12-15; 15:16; 16:23-26).

30. The Father knew things that Jesus did not know (Mk. 13:32; Acts 1:7).

31. Others saw Jesus as a separate Person from the Father (Dan. 7:9-14; Acts 7:56).

32. Jesus committed His own spirit to the Father, not to Himself (Lk. 23:46).

33. Jesus claimed that He came from God and was going back to God (Jn. 8:42; 16:5; 10:36; 17:8).

34. God is a Spirit, not flesh and blood like Jesus was (Jn. 4:24; 19:34; Mt. 16:17; Lk. 24:39).

35. People on earth with Jesus heard God speak as a separate person from heaven (Mt. 3:17; 17:5; 2Pet. 1:16-18).

36. Jesus claimed to be the Son of God, not the Father Himself (Jn. 5:17-35).

37. Jesus called the Father “My God,” even after the resurrection (Jn. 20:17; Rev. 3:12).

38. Jesus called God “My Father” 57 times (Jn. 15:1; Rev. 2:27). How could He be His own God and Father and beget Himself?

39. When Jesus was born on earth angels and people still recognized God in heaven (Lk. 2:7-16). Were they mistaken about God? Was the child all of God on earth and in heaven also?

40. Mary and Joseph acted with utmost ignorance if the baby Jesus was all of God, for they presented Him to the Lord Who was someone other than Jesus (Lk. 2:22).

41. Simeon had a revelation and guidance from the Holy Spirit that Jesus was not the only member of the Godhead (Lk. 2:26-33).

42. John the Baptist knew the Father, but he did not know the Son (Jn. 1:31-34).

43. The Son died, not the Father (1Cor. 15:3; 1Pet. 2:24).

44. Jesus was the only begotten Son of the Father, so could not be the Father or the begetter of Himself (Jn. 1:14).

45. Jesus claimed that He could not and did not do anything of Himself, but that the Father worked through Him (Jn. 5:19,30; 6:38; 8:28; 12:49-50).

46. He did not come to do His own will, but that of the Father who sent Him (Jn. 5:30; 6:38).

47. His doctrine was not His, but the Father’s (Jn. 7:16-17; 8:26).

48. He did not speak of Himself, but of the Father who had sent Him (Jn. 7:16-18; 8:26-40).

49. He did not please Himself, but the Father (Jn. 8:29).

50. He was a Son, not a Father over the house of God (Jn. 8:35-36; Heb. 3:6).

51. He had the same relation to His Father that men have with Satan (Jn. 8:16,35-44; 9:4).

52. He honored the Father as all people should (Jn. 8:49).

53. He did not seek His own glory, but that of the Father (Jn. 8:50-54; 17:4).

54. He knew the Father, but was not the Father (Jn. 8:55; 10:15).

55. He was loved by the Father as a separate person (Jn. 10:17-18).

56. He kept the Father’s commandments and they were not His own (Jn. 12:49-50; 15:10).

57. His disciples were given to Him by the Father (Jn. 10:29; 17:1-25).

58. He was equal with the Father in some things, but not in others (Mk. 13:32; Jn. 5:17-39; 8:13-19,29-42; 19:18-29; Acts 1:7; 1Cor. 11:3; Rev. 1:1).

59. He and the Father were in unity and in each other in the same sense believers are to be in unity and in God (Jn. 10:38; 14:10-11,23; 17:11,21-23).

60. He was the only way to the Father (Jn. 6:37; 14:6).

61. He said, I am not alone or the only witness of My sonship. The Father is another witness (Jn. 5:36-38; 8:13-19,54; 12:49-50; 14:10-11).

62. Over 80 times Jesus affirmed that He was not the Father and not the only person in the Godhead. Christ was the speaker, but not the one spoken of or to (Mt. 7:21; 11:27; 18:10,35; Lk. 2:49; Jn. 5:17-43; 8:19-49; 10:17-37; 14:7-28; 15:1-26; Rev. 1:1; etc.). Is it any wonder that the Godhead, the Trinity, and the unity of God are so mysterious when we force separate persons to become only one person, all because we do not want to recognize the true meaning of the word one as referring to unity rather than individuality in some scriptures? People would be just as great a mystery if we forced the meaning of all men to refer to one person.

63. He was not as great as His Father (Jn. 10:29; 14:28; cp. 1Cor. 11:3).

64. The Father (Mt. 3:17), Jesus (Jn. 10:36), angels (Lk. 1:32-35), demons (Mk. 3:11; 5:7), and apostles (Mt. 16:16; Jn. 1:14; Rom. 8:32; 2Jn. 1:3), all declare the sonship of Jesus, but not once do they declare a Christ-fatherhood.

65. The Father and the Son spoke to each other in audible voices at the same time and place, being heard by many witnesses (Mt. 3:16-17; 7:5; Jn. 12:27-30; 2Pet. 1:17). In no single instance could such speaking be explained as the voice of one individual or be used to prove one Person in the Deity.

66. The word “both” is used of the Father and the Son, proving two Persons (Jn. 15:24; 2Jn. 1:9).

67. The word “also” is used of the Father and the Son, proving two Persons (Jn. 5:19,27; 8:19; 13:32; 14:1).

68. The statement, “They have not known the Father nor Me,” proves two Persons (Jn. 16:3,5).

69. Christ received all power in heaven and in earth (Mt. 28:18). The Father had to be greater than Jesus to give Him that power (Jn. 14:28).

70. Jesus was resurrected and exalted by the Father, so He could not be the Father (Eph. 1:20-23; Php. 2:9-11; Heb. 12:2; 1Pet. 3:22)

71. God made Jesus both Lord and Christ (Acts 2:33-36).

72. Six times in Jn. 14:1-9 Jesus made it clear that He was not the Father.

Holy Spirit Is Not Jesus Or the Father:

73. The Holy Spirit is another Person, distinct from both the Father and the Son (Jn. 5:32; 14:16-17,26; 15:26; 16:7-15).

74. It was necessary that Jesus go away so that the Holy Spirit could come (Jn. 16:5-15).

75. He has been seen with the natural eyes as a separate Person from the Father and the Son (Mt. 3:16-17; Jn. 1:31-34; Rev. 4:5; 5:6).

76. He is symbolized as a separate Person with Christ, both of them before God who sits on a throne (Rev. 1:4-5; 3:1; 4:5; 5:6).

77. He could not be sent from God until Christ was glorified, but would then be sent from both the Father and the Son (Jn. 7:37-39; Acts 2:33-34).

78. He was sent from the Father to endow Jesus with power. This required three Persons: the One who sent Him, the One being sent, and the One who received Him (Acts 10:38; Isa. 11:2; 42:1-7; 61:1-2).

79. A clear distinction is made of the names of all three Persons (Mt. 28:19; 2Cor. 13:14; 1Jn. 5:7).

80. A clear distinction is made between the Son who prays, the Father to whom He prays, and the Holy Spirit for whom He prays (Jn. 14:16).

81. A clear distinction is made between the Son on the right hand of the Father, the Father on the left hand of the Son, and the Holy Spirit who is sent from the Father and the Son (Acts 2:33-36; 7:56; Jn. 14:16-17,26; 15:26; 16:7-15).

82. The Son was already given (Jn. 3:16), when the Spirit was not yet given (Jn. 7:39).

83. The Son can be blasphemed with forgiveness possible; but if the Spirit is blasphemed, no forgiveness is possible. This proves two distinct Persons (Mt. 12:31-32; Mk. 3:29-30; Lk. 12:10).

84. The Samaritans received Jesus, but had not yet received the Holy Spirit (Acts 8:5-25).

85. Jesus could do no miracle by Himself (Jn. 5:19), but by the Holy Spirit He did many miracles (Jn. 2:11; Acts 10:38)

86. The Holy Spirit came not to speak of or glorify Himself, but to speak of and glorify Jesus (Jn. 16:7-15).

87. The descent of the Holy Spirit proved the arrival of Jesus in heaven to sit at the right hand of God, thus proving three Persons (Acts 2:33-34; Jn. 7:39).

88. Jesus claimed even after the resurrection that He was not a spirit being, so He could not be the Father or the Holy Spirit who are spirit beings (Lk. 24:39; Jn. 4:24; 14:16-17,26; 15:26; 16:7-15).

89. In the last book of the Bible the Trinity is seen as working together in all things (Rev. 1:4-6; 3:1; 4:5; 5:6; 21:10; 22:17).

89 Proofs of a Divine Trinity #BOOM Finis Dake- Dake’s Annotated Reference Bible.

What we mean by Divine Trinity is that there are three separate and distinct persons in the Godhead, each one having His own personal spirit body, personal soul, and personal spirit in the same sense each human being, angel, or any other being has his own body, soul, and spirit. We mean by body, whether a spirit body or a flesh body, the house for the indwelling of the personal soul and spirit. The soul is that which feels and the spirit is that which knows.



The doctrine of the Trinity can be clearly seen, being understood by the visible things that are made, even to His eternal power and Godhead (Rom. 1:20). What on earth was created in the image and likeness of God? Man (Gen. 1:26-28). Do God’s image and likeness consist only of moral and spiritual powers? If so, it can be concluded that man is only a moral and spiritual being. Is God bodiless? If so, we can conclude that man is also bodiless.



Is God only one being made up of several persons or beings in the one being? If so, we can conclude that man is one person or being made up of many. Does God need a flesh body in order to have any kind of body? No! There are such things as spirit and heavenly bodies. See 1Cor. 15:35-38. From this passage we learn that all things in creation — grain, fish, birds, beasts, man, angels, and even the planets — have bodies, sizes, shapes, and forms.



The Bible declares that God has a body, shape, image, likeness, physical parts, a personal soul and spirit, and all other things that constitute a being or a person with a body, soul, and spirit (see note, Jn. 4:24; note, Jn. 5:37; The Doctrine of Man.



Angels, cherubim, seraphim, and all other spirit beings have spirit bodies and personal souls and spirits. They have been seen with the natural eyes of men over 100 times in Scripture (see Appearances of Angels to Men). If all other spirit beings have spirit bodies, could not the members of the Trinity also have spirit bodies? The 284 passages on spirits in Scripture prove that spirit bodies are just as real and capable of operation in the material worlds as are flesh bodies. There is no such thing as a world of creations made up of invisible substance. The so-called spirit world must be understood simply as spirit beings inhabiting material worlds created by God. Heaven itself is a material place(Gen. 1:1; Heb. 11:10-16), having cities, mansions, furniture, inhabitants, living conditions, etc.



God has been seen physically by human eyes many times (Gen. 18:1-33; 19:24; 32:24-30; Ex. 24:11; 33:11-23; Josh. 5:13-15; Judg. 6:11-23; 13:3-25; 1Chr. 21:16-17; Job 42:5; Isa. 6; Ezek. 1:26-28; 10:1,20; 40:3; Dan. 7:9-14; 10:5-10; Acts 7:56-59; Rev. 4:2-5; 5:1,5-7,11-14; 6:16; 7:9-17; 19:4; 21:3-5; 22:4).



In over 20,000 references about God in Scripture we get to know all we need to know about the subject. If we will take the Bible literally as to what it says about Him, as we do with other things the subject will be very clear; but if we make God a mystery, ignoring the plain statements of Scripture about Him, and refusing to believe the many descriptions of God given by those who have seen one, two, and three separate persons called “God,” then we ill remain in ignorance.



It is true there are a few figurative statements about God in Scripture, as there are about man and other things, but shall we do away with the reality of man and these other things because of a few figures of speech? Let us make man mere salt and lights (Mt. 5:13-14), if we are going to do away with God because of a few figures of speech.
</p>
<aside class=
Subscribe to receive all news to your email or phone: [wysija_form id="1"]

20 Comments

  • Troy Day
    Reply April 26, 2017

    Troy Day

    This is a good one Walter Polasik

    • Walter Polasik
      Reply April 27, 2017

      Walter Polasik

      Troy, I didn’t have a chance yet to read the entire article (it’s a lengthy one). From what I can see it really does bring out all of the references regarding the Trinity. I once did a paper on the Trinity entitled, “Echad, Yachid and the Trinity in the Old Testament”. (I also cited the comparative usage of Greek in the N.T., esp, “heis” for “one”, compound unity in Jn. 17 and elsewhere). My only problem with the above article is (predictably) #16 allegedly showing how the Son IS (not was) positionally inferior to the Father. (and, by inference, the Spirit). The reason this is a problem you already know (as we’ve been over it many times). God could not be ONE GOD if the constituent members were so radically ranked and unequal in power and eternality (or, more precisely, infinity).
      The other problem I have is in the very introduction to the article. I now realize where Benny Hinn got his outrageous statement (which he claimed, on TBN at the time, as a “divine revelation”) that each person in the Trinity “has their own personal spirit, soul and body” Hinn prefaced this astounding doctrine by saying, “I’m going to shock you and maybe I should: there’s 9 of ’em!” (You see what he meant, don’t you?) But that’s classic Hinn for you. Little on substance but much shock value. However, biblically there is nothing to support this. Jesus says, “God is Spirit” (Jn. 4:24). This implies, at least to our sense of understanding, non-corporeality. Moreover, He is said to be the “Father of Spirits”. (Heb. 12:9) If you really want to “take off” on all of this you can go study Mormon doctrine on the pre-existence, Elohim making spirit-children in heaven which then await bodies to inhabit (Heb. 10:5). Coincidentally, if God has a body (spiritual or not) what are his spirit-children doing body-less? But then, Mormon theology was always a mess to begin with.

    • Walter Polasik
      Reply April 27, 2017

      Walter Polasik

      As to whether God has an actual body (i.e. looks like us), my personal inclination is that this is true. The fact that the Mormons picked up on it and made it one of their linchpins doesn’t disturb me as much. However, they speak in absolute certainty (due to Smith’s teachings) whereas I can only speculate since the Bible doesn’t give enough data on this. Moreover, the Mormons hold to tri-theism, the belief in THREE literal gods, not one. (They say God is “one” only in “unity of will”). Had we just Gen. 3:22 ALONE to go by, we might conclude tri-theism. But we have more that is said on the subject.
      I just don’t like the notion that all too many Pentecostals (and Charismatics and Third-Wavers) like to take off on “flights of fancy” when speculating on things we have little information about—-and some even dare call their conclusions “revelation”. What do you think happened at Arroyo Seco at the 2nd General Conference of the Assemblies of God? Why, a brother had a “revelation” that the early believers were baptized in the name of Jesus only and that since God was said to be ONE He couldn’t possibly be THREE. And the UPCI was born. Yup.

  • Troy Day
    Reply April 27, 2017

    Troy Day

    Take your time before you respond then Walter Polasik It’s basically 89 proofs full with Bible verses from the BIBLE. Hope you’ve read it!

  • Reply August 19, 2018

    Apostle Stephen Okema

    May you send into my e-mail the 89 proofs of triniyt and other detail teachings for the same subject.

  • Troy Day
    Reply May 25, 2020

    Troy Day

    Neil Steven Lawrence Ross Tucker would you like to talk over a few of these?

    13. Jesus Christ is called the son of Abraham, David, Mary, and of God (Mt. 1:1; Mk. 1:1; 6:3). He is just as much a separate person from God as He is of these other persons.

    14. Two Persons are referred to many times in the New Testament (Mt. 11:27; Lk. 23:46; Jn. 1:1-2,18; 5:19-20; 14:1-9; 16:15; 17:3,10; Acts 2:38-39; 3:13-26; Php. 2:5-11; Eph. 3:5; Col. 1:5; 2Th. 2:16-17; Tit. 2:13; Heb. 1:1-3; Rev. 20:6; 22:3).

    15. Two and three Persons are mentioned in the introductions to New Testament books (Rom. 1:1-4,7; 1Cor. 1:3; Jas. 1:1; 1Pet. 1:1-3; 2Jn. 1:3; Rev. 1:1-6; etc.).

    16. God is the head of Christ and thus greater than He in position (1Cor. 3:23; 11:3; 1Chr. 29:11; Jn. 14:28).

    • Neil Steven Lawrence

      Troy Day The Trinity is the most complex being in the universe. There’s nothing like the Trinity. God himself says many times in Scripture “who will you compare Me too?“ Jesus plays various roles depending on who he is with on earth or in heaven. Son, Savior, King, sacrifice, Lamb, Lion, Friend, heavenly warrior…

      None of the persons of the Trinity are greater in essence than the other. Said another way, all are equal in power, knowledge, presence, etc.

      The way in which the father is greater than Jesus the Son is in the role that he plays.

    • Ross Tucker
      Reply May 26, 2020

      Ross Tucker

      Neil Steven Lawrence Lots of words and assertions, with zero scriptural support. Typical Trinitarian.

    • Troy Day
      Reply May 26, 2020

      Troy Day

      Ross Tucker how do you mean -0 scripture?

      I have given you 89 solid theological points that prove the Trinity ALL accompanied and explained via hundreds of BIBLE verse I specifically pointed 3-4 points to your previous question Are you able to answer them?

      the witness paradigm you present is highly invalid Your Ex/Lev scripture is OUT of context The two witnesses have to be PERSONS not multiple personality divinity as you propose

      Two Persons are referred to many times in the New Testament (Mt. 11:27; Lk. 23:46; Jn. 1:1-2,18; 5:19-20; 14:1-9; 16:15; 17:3,10; Acts 2:38-39; 3:13-26; Php. 2:5-11; Eph. 3:5; Col. 1:5; 2Th. 2:16-17; Tit. 2:13; Heb. 1:1-3; Rev. 20:6; 22:3).

    • Ross Tucker
      Reply May 26, 2020

      Ross Tucker

      Troy Day You’ve given zero scriptural evidence of any Trinity.

    • Troy Day
      Reply May 26, 2020

      Troy Day

      Ross Tucker You can prove that by going through my list with hundreds of Scriptures and disprove them one by one if you’d like as presented solid evidence But until then I have hundreds of Scriptures proving the Trinity and you have 0 arguments against them That’s how it works my friend

    • Ross Tucker
      Reply May 26, 2020

      Ross Tucker

      Troy Day You’re bluffing, and I’m calling it for what it is–a bluff. You’ve given zero scriptures that support any Trinitarian concepts.

    • Troy Day
      Reply May 26, 2020

      Troy Day

      Ross Tucker so you admit you are out of ammo I am calling you out on each verse I posted 10-4

    • Ross Tucker
      Reply May 26, 2020

      Ross Tucker

      Troy Day I’ve seen no scriptural proof come from you.

    • Troy Day
      Reply May 26, 2020

      Troy Day

      Ross Tucker wow that is just not true Look at my comments above Do I need to repeat them all?

    • Ross Tucker
      Reply May 27, 2020

      Ross Tucker

      Troy Day I see zero scriptural proof in your posts

  • Steve Losee
    Reply May 25, 2020

    Steve Losee

    amen!

  • Jon Sellers
    Reply May 26, 2020

    Jon Sellers

    I agree with the Trinity. It is clear in scripture. However, it does not mean we can argue for God having a body, soul and spirit. Here is the quote from Dake. It is anthropormorphic. It ascribes to God what he sees in man.

    What we mean by Divine Trinity is that there are three separate and distinct persons in the Godhead, each one having His own personal spirit body, personal soul, and personal spirit in the same sense each human being, angel, or any other being has his own body, soul, and spirit. We mean by body, whether a spirit body or a flesh body, the house for the indwelling of the personal soul and spirit. The soul is that which feels and the spirit is that which knows.

  • Chris Westerman
    Reply May 29, 2020

    Chris Westerman

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.