3 Bible questions from ACTS 23 you just can’t answer

3 Bible questions from ACTS 23 you just can’t answer
Posted by in Facebook's Pentecostal Theology Group View the Original Post

1. Was Paul sincere when he said that he did not know that the man who gave the order to slap him was the High Priest or was he speaking sarcastically?
2. Why would the Lord feel the need to encourage Paul if he was remaining bold and unmoving
3. Ship with 470 soldiers would have been both unsuccessful and suicidal. This being said, Paul ends up safe. But what happened to the men who put themselves under the oath?

6 Comments

  • RichardAnna Boyce
    Reply September 10, 2019

    RichardAnna Boyce

    Acts 24:21-27
    Paul showed that the inciting statement belonged to a religious context He also brought the truth of “the resurrection of the dead” before Felix again.

    24:22. Felix already possessed a more accurate knowledge of the Way. Thus after listening to Paul he adjourned the proceedings and withheld his decision, saying he would wait until the arrival of “Lysias the commander.” This must have served as some kind of delay tactic since Felix already knew Lysias’s judgment on the matter.

    24:23. For the interval Felix commanded the centurion to keep Paul and to let him have liberty. He also instructed the centurion not to forbid any of his friends to provide for or visit Paul. The brutal Gentile leader thus cared more for Paul than his own countrymen. Paul stayed in the Herodian castle (cf. 23:35) under guard and yet with some freedom.

    24:24. Felix left Caesarea and returned with his wife Drusilla, who was Jewish. Then Felix sent for Paul and heard him concerning the essential truth that could have allayed Felix’s fears about eternity.

    24:25. Paul reasoned about righteousness, self-control (cf. Gal 5:23; 2 Peter 1:6), and the judgment to come. As a result Felix was afraid and sent Paul away.

    24:26. Luke then reveals an ulterior motive of Felix’s—he also hoped for a bribe. The profit motive apparently trumped Felix’s fear of future judgment—he sent for Paul more often to converse with him.

    24:27. Felix never ruled on Paul. Luke reports that after two years Porcius Festus succeeded Felix. Moreover, Felix, wanting to do the Jews a favor, left Paul bound.

    • Troy Day
      Reply September 11, 2019

      Troy Day

      you are not answering again – just talking

  • Troy Day
    Reply September 11, 2019

    Troy Day

    Joshwa Bedford can you answer all 3?

  • Jireh D Hormann
    Reply September 11, 2019

    Jireh D Hormann

    1). What would Paul gain/benefit from by lying saying that he didn’t know the High Priest? I would not take Paul as a liar.

    2). Cause clearly Paul was seeing the events circling around him and needed the encouragement from the Lord.

    3) How would we know that a ship of 470 would be unsuccessful? It is not mentioned how big the boat was. Keeping your oath in that day was a huge thing. According to tradition, if the oath was not kept, the penalty was death.

  • Brenda Smith
    Reply September 11, 2019

    Brenda Smith

    #1 Taking Paul at his word, he was sincere….but perhaps his eye trouble prevented him from recognizing Ananias after having been gone from Jerusalem for so long, or Ananias could have not been dressed in his High Priestly garments or because Ananias was not acting in accordance with the law, Paul refused to acknowledge him as such and was speaking sarcastically. #2… could one remain bold and unmoving when in the midst of a mob about to be pulled to pieces? But the Lord is a very present help in time of trouble and was granting Paul’s request to visit Rome and share the Gospel. #3…they went by horse, not ship. And the 40 men, having put themselves under a divine curse, would be dead after 3-5 days of thirst.

  • Troy Day
    Reply September 11, 2019

    Troy Day

    how did so well educated law teacher not know the high priest ?

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